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Writings Volume 4

By: Abraham Lincoln

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: -- It will be very difficult for an audience so large as this to hear distinctly what a speaker says, and consequently it is important that as profound silence be preserved as possible.

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The Wrong Box

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. In Which Morris Suspects How very little does the amateur, dwelling at home at ease, comprehend the labours and perils of the author, and, when he smilingly skims the surface of a work of fiction, how little does he consider the hours of toil, consultation of authorities, researches in the Bodleian, correspondence with learned and illegible Germans ? in one word, the vast scaffolding that was first built up and then knocked down, to while away an hour...

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Aaron Trow

By: Anthony Trollope

Excerpt: There have, however, been instances in which convicts have escaped from their confinement, and made their way out among the islands. Poor wretches! As a rule, there is but little chance for any that can so escape. The whole length of the cluster is but twenty miles, and the breadth is under four. The prisoners are, of course, white men, and the lower orders of Bermuda, among whom alone could a runagate have any chance of hiding himself, are all negroes; so that ...

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Denzil Quarrier

By: George Robert Gissing, 1857-1903

CHAPTER I: For half an hour there had been perfect silence in the room. The cat upon the hearthrug slept profoundly; the fire was sunk to a still red glow; the cold light of the autumn afternoon thickened into dusk. Lilian seemed to be reading. She sat on a footstool, her arm resting on the seat of a basket-chair, which supported a large open volume. But her hand was never raised to turn a page, and it was long since her eyes had gathered the sense of the lines on which ...

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Faust : Der Tragoedie Zweiter Teil

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Excerpt: MEPHISTOPHELES. Was ist verwuenscht und stets willkommen? Was ist ersehnt und stets verjagt? Was immerfort in Schutz genommen? Was hart gescholten und verklagt? Wen darfst du nicht herbeiberufen? Wen hoeret jeder gern genannt? Was naht sich deines Thrones Stufen? Was hat sich selbst hinweggebannt?

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Immortals Crowned by the French Academy : Cinq Mars, V1

By: Alfred De Vigny

Preface: The reputation of Alfred de Vigny has endured extraordinary vicissitudes in France. First he was lauded as the precursor of French romantic poetry and stately prose; then he sank in semi?oblivion, became the curiosity of criticism, died in retirement, and was neglected for a long time, until the last ten years or so produced a marked revolution of taste in France. The supremacy of Victor Hugo has been, if not questioned, at least mitigated; other poets have reco...

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The True Story of a Vampire

By: Stenbock Eric

Vampire stories are generally located in Styria; mine is also. Styria is by no means the romantic kind of place described by those who have certainly never been there. It is a flat, uninteresting country, only celebrated for its turkeys, its capons, and the stupidity of its inhabitants. Vampires generally arrive at night, in carriages drawn by two black horses.

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The Witches' Sabbath

By: James Platt

Excerpt: Our scene is one of those terrific peaks set apart by tradition as the trysting place of wizards and witches, and of every kind of folk that prefers dark to day. It might have been Mount Elias, or the Brocken, associated with Doctor Faustus. It might have been the Horsel or Venusberg of Tannhaeuser, or the Black Forest. Enough that it was one of these. Not a star wrinkled the brow of night. Only in the distance the twinkling lights of some town could be seen. Lo...

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The Tiger's Eye : A Jungle Fairy Tale

By: L. Frank Baum

This is a fairy tale of Pocofo, which is an island of the South Seas, where the people are black and have never heard of telephones or chocolate caramels. One half the Island of Pocofo is a dense jungle, filled with wild beasts which devour one another when they cannot get black people to eat. The other half of the island is inhabited by warring tribes of natives who fight and rob each other when they are not hunting the wild beasts. So it is not very peaceful in Pocofo,...

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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction Series

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: In our last volume we commenced the design of illustrating the principal Cities of Europe, by a series of picturesque views?one of which is represented in the above engraving. Our miscellaneous duties in identifying the pages of the MIRROR with subjects of contemporary interest, and anxiety to bring them on our little tapis?(qy. Twopence?)?will best account for the interval which has elapsed since the commencement of our design?with a View of London; but were al...

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Miss Rodney's Leisure

By: Miss Rodney's Leisure

A young woman of about eight-and-twenty, in tailor-made costume, with unadorned hat of brown felt, and irreproachable umbrella; a young woman who walked faster than anyone in Wattleborough, yet never looked hurried; who crossed a muddy street seemingly without a thought for her skirts, yet somehow was never splashed; who held up her head like one thoroughly at home in the world, and frequently smiled at her own thoughts. Those who did not know her asked who she was; thos...

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The Demoiselle Dys

By: Robert W. Chambers

Excerpt: THE utter desolation of the scene began to have its effect; I sat down to face the situation and, if possible, recall to mind some landmark which might aid me in extricating myself from my present position. If I could only find the ocean again all would be clear, for I knew one could see the island of Groix from the cliffs. I laid down my gun, and kneeling behind a rock lighted my pipe. Then I looked at my watch. It was nearly four o?clock. I might have wandered...

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Justin's Hortatory Address to the Greeks

Excerpt: Chapter 1. REASONS FOR ADDRESSING THE GREEKS. As I begin this hortatory address to you, ye men of Greece, I pray God that I may know what I ought to say to you, and that you, shaking off your habitual(1) love of disputing, and being livered from the error of your fathers, may how choose what is profitable; not fancying that you commit any offence against your forefathers, though the things which you formerly considered by no means salutary should now seem useful...

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The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic, V...

By: William H. Prescott

Excerpt: In such intervals of leisure as occurred amid their military operations, Ferdinand and Isabella were diligently occupied with the interior government of the kingdom, and especially with the rigid administration of justice, the most difficult of all duties in an imperfectly civilized state of society. The queen found especial demand for this in the northern provinces, whose rude inhabitants were little used to subordination. She compelled the great nobles to lay ...

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The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Volume Iv

By: Thomas Babington Macaulay

PREFACE. It was most reluctantly that I determined to suspend, during the last autumn, a work which is the business and the pleasure of my life, in order to prepare these Speeches for publication; and it is most reluctantly that I now give them to the world. Even if I estimated their oratorical merit much more highly than I do, I should not willingly have revived, in the quiet times in which we are so happy as to live, the memory of those fierce contentions in which too ...

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Phaedra

By: Racine, Jean Baptiste, 1678-1747

I could a Tale unfold! On the northern shore of Sicily are still to be seen the magnificent remains of a castle, which formerly belonged to the noble house of Mazzini. It stands in the centre of a small bay, and upon a gentle acclivity, which, on one side, slopes towards the sea, and on the other rises into an eminence crowned by dark woods. The situation is admirably beautiful and picturesque, and the ruins have an air of ancient grandeur, which, contrasted with the pre...

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The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Nov/Dec 1662

By: Mynors Bright

Excerpt: November 1st. Up and after a little while with my workmen I went to my office, and then to our sitting all the morning. At noon with Mr. Creede, whom I found at my house, to the Trinity House, to a great dinner there, by invitacion, and much company. It seems one Captain Evans makes his Elder Brother?s dinner to?day. Among other discourses one Mr. Oudant, secretary to the late Princesse of Orange, did discourse of the convenience as to keeping the highways from ...

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The Cash Boy

By: Horatio Alger, Jr.

The Cash Boy, by Horatio Alger, Jr., as the name implies, is a story about a boy and for boys. Through some conspiracy, the hero of the story when a baby, was taken from his relatives and given into the care of a kind woman. Not knowing his name, she gave him her husband's name, Frank Fowler. She had one little daughter, Grace, and showing no partiality in the treatment of her children, Frank never suspected that she was not his sister. However, at the death of Mrs. Fowl...

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Shehens Houn Dogs

By: Elia Wilkinson Peattie

EDWARD Berenson, the Washington correspondent for the New York News, descended from the sleeping-car at Hardin, Kentucky, and inquired for the stage to Ballington's Gap. But there was, it appeared, no stage. Neither was a conveyance to be hired. The community looked at Berenson and went by on the other side. He had, indeed, as he recollected, with a too confiding candor, registered himself from Washington, and there were reasons in plenty why strangers should not be take...

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Heroes of the Telegraph

By: John Munro

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE ORIGIN OF THE TELEGRAPH. The history of an invention, whether of science or art, may be compared to the growth of an organism such as a tree. The wind, or the random visit of a bee, unites the pollen in the flower, the green fruit forms and ripens to the perfect seed, which, on being planted in congenial soil, takes root and flourishes. Even so from the chance combination of two facts in the human mind, a crude idea springs, and after maturing int...

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