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Other People Who Read Reply to Lord Byron's Fare Thee Well Also Read


 
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Decoration Day

By: Sarah Orne Jewett

Excerpt: A WEEK before the 30th of May, three friends John Stover and Henry Merrill and Asa Brown happened to meet on Saturday evening at Barton?s store at the Plains. They were enjoying this idle hour after a busy week. After long easterly rains, the sun had at last come out bright and clear, and all the Barlow farmers had been planting. There was even a good deal of ploughing left to be done, the season was so backward. The three middle?aged men were old friends. They ...

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The Dock Rats of New York

By: Old Sleuth

Excerpt: THE words fell from beautiful lips under the most exciting circumstances. A boat rocked upon the calm water that murmured along the shore, when a young man came down from the upper bank of white drift sand, and seized the tiller rope. He had the rope in his hand, his arm was upraised to draw the boat to his feet, when he was startled by hearing the words with which we open our narrative.

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The Golden Calf

By: Mary E. Braddon

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE ARTICLED PUPIL. ?Where is Miss Palliser?? inquired Miss Pew, in that awful voice of hers, at which the class?room trembled, as at unexpected thunder. A murmur ran along the desks, from girl to girl, and then some one, near that end of the long room which was sacred to Miss Pew and her lieutenants, said that Miss Palliser was not in the class?room.

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Women and Public Housekeeping

By: Jane Addams

Excerpt: A city is in many respects a great business corporation, but in other re? spects it is enlarged housekeeping. If American cities have failed in the first, partly because officeholders have carried with them the predatory instinct learned in competitive business, and cannot help ?working a good thing? when they have an opportunity, may we not say that city housekeeping has failed partly because women, the traditional housekeepers, have not been consulted as to it...

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Grace Harlowe's Second Year at Overton College

By: Jessie Graham Flower

Excerpt: Chapter 1. OVERTON CLAIMS HER OWN. ?Oh, there goes Grace Harlowe! Grace! Grace! Wait a minute!? A curly?haired little girl hastily deposited her suit case, golf bag, two magazines and a box of candy on the nearest bench and ran toward a quartette of girls who had just left the train that stood puffing noisily in front of the station at Overton. The tall, gray?eyed young woman in blue turned at the call, and, running back, met the other half way. ?Why, Arline!? s...

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Facino Cane

By: Honoré de Balzac

I once used to live in a little street which probably is not known to you -- the Rue de Lesdiguieres. It is a turning out of the Rue Saint- Antoine, beginning just opposite a fountain near the Place de la Bastille, and ending in the Rue de la Cerisaie. Love of knowledge stranded me in a garret; my nights I spent in work, my days in reading at the Bibliotheque d'Orleans, close by. I lived frugally; I had accepted the conditions of the monastic life, necessary conditions f...

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Tales and Sketches

By: John Greenleaf Whittier

Excerpt: MARGARET SMITH?S JOURNAL IN THE PROVINCE OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY I remember I did promise my kind Cousin Oliver (whom I pray God to have always in his keeping), when I parted with him nigh unto three months ago, at mine Uncle Grindall?s, that, on coming to this new country, I would, for his sake and perusal, keep a little journal of whatsoever did happen both unto myself and unto those with whom I might sojourn; as also, some account of the country and its marvels,...

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An Excursion to Canada

By: Henry David Thoreau

I fear that I have not got much to say about Canada, not having seen much; what I got by going to Canada was a cold. I left Concord, Massachusetts, Wednesday morning Sep. 25th 1850, for Quebec. Fare seven dollars there and back; distance from Boston five hundred and ten miles; being obliged to leave Montreal on the return as soon as Friday Oct. 4th, or within ten days. I will not stop to tell the reader the names of my fellow travellers; there were said to be fifteen hun...

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Original Maupassant Short Stories, Volume 3

By: Guy De Maupassant

Excerpt: MISS HARRIET. There were seven of us on a drag, four women and three men; one of the latter sat on the box seat beside the coachman. We were ascending, at a snail?s pace, the winding road up the steep cliff along the coast. Setting out from Etretat at break of day in order to visit the ruins of Tancarville, we were still half asleep, benumbed by the fresh air of the morning. The women especially, who were little accustomed to these early excursions, half opened ...

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The First Book of Urizen

By: William Blake

Excerpt: Preludium to the First Book of Urizen Of the primeval Priest?s assum?d power, When Eternals spurn?d back his Religion, And gave him a place in the North, Obscure, shadowy, void, solitary. Eternals! I hear your call gladly. Dictate swift winged words, and fear not To unfold your dark visions of torment.

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Samson Agonistes

By: John Milton

SAmson made Captive, Blind, and now in the Prison at Gaza, there to labour as in a common work-house, on a Festival day, in the general cessation from labour, comes forth into the open Air, to a place nigh, somewhat retir'd there to sit a while and bemoan his condition. Where he happens at length to be visited by certain friends and equals of his tribe, which make the Chorus, who seek to comfort him what they can; then by his old Father Manoa, who endeavours the like, an...

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The Haunted Bookshop

By: Christopher Morley

Excerpt: Chapter One. The Haunted Bookshop If you are ever in Brooklyn, that borough of superb sunsets and magnificent vistas of husband?propelled baby?carriages, it is to be hoped you may chance upon a quiet by?street where there is a very remarkable bookshop. This bookshop, which does business under the unusual name ?Parnassus at Home,? is housed in one of the comfortable old brown?stone dwellings which have been the joy of several generations of plumbers and cockroach...

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Northern Georgia Sketches

By: Will Nathaniel Harben

Excerpt: Dedication to Joel Chandler Harris in grateful acknowledgment of the kindly encouragement which made this book possible. Acknowledgment I am indebted to the publishers of The Century Magazine, Lippincott?s Magazine, The Ladies? Home Journal, Book News, The Black Cat, and to the Bacheller Syndicate for the courteous permission to reprint the sketches contained in this volume.

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The Stone Chamber

By: H.B. Marriott Watson

Excerpt: It was not until early summer that Warrington took possession of Marvyn Abbey. He had bought the property in the preceding autumn, but the place had so fallen into decay through the disorders of time that more than six months elapsed ere it was inhabitable. The delay, however, fell out conveniently for Warrington; for the Bosanquets spent the winter abroad, and nothing must suit but he must spend it with them. There was never a man who pursued his passion with s...

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The Annals

By: P. Cornelius Tacitus

ROME at the beginning was ruled by kings. Freedom and the consulship were established by Lucius Brutus. Dictatorships were held for a temporary crisis. The power of the decemvirs did not last beyond two years, nor was the consular jurisdiction of the military tribunes of long duration. The despotisms of Cinna and Sulla were brief; the rule of Pompeius and of Crassus soon yielded before Caesar; the arms of Lepidus and Antonius before Augustus; who, when the world was wear...

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The Adventure of the Impromptu Mountaineer

By: Grant Allen

THE explosion and evaporation of Dr. Fortescue- Langley (with whom were amalgamated the Comte de Laroche-sur-Loiret, Mr. Higginson the courier, and whatever else that versatile gentleman chose to call himself) entailed many results of varying magnitudes. In the first place, Mrs. Evelegh ordered a Great Manitou. That, however, mattered little to the firm,' as I loved to call us (because it shocked dear Elsie so); for, of course, after all her kindness we couldn't accept o...

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Mrs. Helen Jackson

By: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911

IT is curious to see how promptly time begins to apply to the memory of remarkable persons, as to their tombstones, an effacing process that soon makes all inscriptions look alike. Already we see the beginnings of this tendency in regard to the late Mrs. Helen Jackson. The most brilliant, impetuous, and thoroughly individual woman of her time, — one whose very temperament seemed mingled of sunshine and fire, — she is already being portrayed simply as a conventional Sunda...

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War and Peace, Volume 3

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Prince Vasili was not a man who deliberately thought out his plans. Still less did he think of injuring anyone for his own advantage. He was merely a man of the world who had got on and to whom getting on had become a habit. Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met. Of these plans he had not merely ...

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Mr. Brisher's Treasure

By: Herbert George Wells

Excerpt: ?You can?t be TOO careful WHO you marry,? said Mr. Brisher, and pulled thoughtfully with a fat?wristed hand at the lank moustache that hides his want of chin. ?That?s why ?I ventured. ?Yes,? said Mr. Brisher, with a solemn light in his bleary, blue?grey eyes, moving his head expressively and breathing alcohol INTIMATELY at me. ?There?s lots as ?ave ?ad a try at me many as I could name in this town but none ?ave done it none.? I surveyed the flushed countenance, ...

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Stories of a Western Town

By: Octave Thanet

There was a drabble of dead leaves on the sidewalk which was of wood, and on the roadway which was of macadam and stiff mud. The wind blew sharply, for it was a December day and only six in the morning. Nor were the houses high enough to furnish any independent bulwark; they were low, wooden dwellings, the tallest a bare two stories in height, the majority only one story. But they were in good painting and repair, and most of them had a homely gayety of geraniums or bouv...

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