World Library  

Other People Who Read An Excursion to Canada Also Read


 
  • Cover Image

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gusta...

By: Olaudah Equiano

Excerpt: CHAP. VII. The author?s disgust at the West Indies?Forms schemes to obtain his freedom?Ludicrous disappointment he and his Captain meet with in Georgia?At last, by several successful voyages, he acquires a sum of money sufficient to purchase it?Applies to his master, who accepts it, and grants his manumission, to his great joy?He afterwards enters as a freeman on board one of Mr. King?s ships, and sails for Georgia?Impositions on free negroes as usual?His ventur...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Polity of Athenians and Lacedaemonians

By: Xenophon

Xenophon the Athenian was born 431 B.C. He was a pupil of Socrates. He marched with the Spartans, and was exiled from Athens. Sparta gave him land and property in Scillus, where he lived for many years before having to move once more, to settle in Corinth. He died in 354 B.C. The Polity of the Lacedaemonians talks about the laws and institutions created by Lycurgus, which train and develop Spartan citizens from birth to old age. The Polity of the Lacedaemonians talks abo...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Middle Years

By: Henry James

Excerpt: THE April day was soft and bright, and poor Dencombe, happy in the conceit of reasserted strength, stood in the garden of the hotel, comparing, with a deliberation in which however there was still something of languor, the attractions of easy strolls.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Roman Fever

By: Edith Wharton

Excerpt: From the table at which they had been lunching two American ladies of ripe but well?cared?for middle age moved across the lofty terrace of the Roman restaurant and, leaning on its parapet, looked first at each other, and then down on the outspread glories of the Palatine and the Forum, with the same expression of vague but benevolent approval. As they leaned there a girlish voice echoed up gaily from the stairs leading to the court below. ?Well, come along, then...

Read More
  • Cover Image

It Is Never Too Late to Mend

By: Charles Reade

PREFACE: SHOULD these characters, imbedded in carpet incidents, interest the public at all, they will probably reappear in more potent scenes. This design, which I may never live to execute, is, I fear, the only excuse I can at present offer for some pages, forming the twelfth chapter of this volume.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Little Lady of the Big House

By: Jack London

Excerpt: Chapter One. He awoke in the dark. His awakening was simple, easy, without movement save for the eyes that opened and made him aware of darkness. Unlike most, who must feel and grope and listen to, and contact with, the world about them, he knew himself on the moment of awakening, instantly identifying himself in time and place and personality. After the lapsed hours of sleep he took up, without effort, the interrupted tale of his days. He knew himself to be Dic...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Tao Te Ching

By: Lao?Tse

Excerpt: Part 1. Ch. 1. 1. The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao. The name that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging name. 2. (Conceived of as) having no name, it is the Originator of heaven and earth; (conceived of as) having a name, it is the Mother of all things.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Curiosites Infernales

By: P.L. Jacob

Excerpt: Simon Goulart en envoyant a son frere Jean Goulart un volume de son Thresor des histoires admirables et memorables lui dit: ?Ce sont pieces rapportees et enfilees grossierement ausquelles je n'adjouste presque rien du mien, pour laisser a vous et a tout autre debonnaire lecteur la meditation libre du fruit qu'on en peut et doit tirer. Dieu y apparoit en diverses sortes pres et loin, pour maintenir sa justice contre les coeurs farouches de tant de personnes qui l...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Beacon Lights of History Volume III Part 1

By: John Lord

Excerpt: THE most extraordinary man who arose after the fall of the Roman Empire was doubtless Mohammed;* and his posthumous influence has been greater than that of any man since Christianity was declared, if we take into account the number of those who have received his doctrines. Even Christianity never had so rapid a spread. More than a sixth part of the human race are the professed followers of the Arabian prophet.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Man in the Iron Mask

By: Pere Alexandre Dumas

Introduction: In the months of March?July in 1844, in the magazine Le Siecle, the first portion of a story appeared, penned by the celebrated playwright Alexandre Dumas. It was based, he claimed, on some manuscripts he had found a year earlier in the Bibliotheque Nationale while researching a history he planned to write on Louis XIV. They chronicled the adventures of a young man named D'Artagnan who, upon entering Paris, became almost immediately embroiled in court intri...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Wacousta : Volume 3

By: John Richardson

It is well known to every man conversant with the earlier history of this country that, shortly subsequent to the cession of the Canadas to England by France, Ponteac, the great head of the Indian race of that period, had formed a federation of the various tribes, threatening extermin ation to the British posts established along the Western frontier. These were nine in number, and the following stratagem was resorted to by the artful chief to effect their reduction. Inve...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Tom Swift Among the Fire Fighters

By: Victor Appleton

CHAPTER I. A BAD PLACE FOR A FIRE IMPOSSIBLE, Ned! It can't be as much as that! Well, you can prove the additions yourself, Tom, on one of the adding machines. I've been over 'em twice, and get the same result each time. There are the figures. They say figures don't lie, though it doesn't follow that the opposite is true, for those who do not stick closely to the truth do, sometimes, figure. But there you have it; your financial statement for the year, and Ned Newton, bu...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Humble Pie

By: Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman

THERE are some people who never during their whole lives awake to a consciousness of themselves, as they are recognized by others; there are some who awake too early, to their undoing, and the flimsiness of their characters; there are some who awake late with a shock, which does not dethrone them from their individuality, but causes them agony, and is possibly for their benefit. Maria Gorham was one of the last, and for the first time in her life she saw herself reflecte...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Best British Short Stories of 1922

By: Edward J. O'Brien

Excerpt: BY WAY OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Grateful acknowledgement for permission to include the stories and other material in this volume is made to the following authors, editors, literary agents, and publishers: To the Editor of The Saturday Evening Post, the Editor of The Dial, the Editor of The Freeman, the Editor of The English Review, the Editor of The Century Magazine, the Editor of Harpers? Bazar, the Editor of The Ladies? Home Journal, the Editor of The Chicago Tribun...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The London and Country Brewer

The Preface: The many Inhabitants of Cities and Towns, as well as Travellers, that have for a long time suffered great Prejudices from unwholsome and unpleasant Beers and Ales, by the badness of Malts, underboiling the Worts, mixing injurious Ingredients, the unskilfulness of the Brewer, and the great Expense that Families have been at in buying them clogg?d with a heavy Excise, has moved me to undertake the writing of this Treatise on Brewing, Wherein I have endeavour?d...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Through the Ivory Gate

By: Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews

Breeze filtered through shuffling leafage, the June morning sunlight came in at the open window by the boy's bed, under the green shades, across the shadowy, white room, and danced a noiseless dance of youth and freshness and springtime against the wall opposite. The boy's head stirred on his pillow. He spoke a quick word from out of his dream. The key? he said inquiringly, and the sound of his own voice awoke him. Dark, drowsy eyes opened, and he stared half-seeing, at ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Historical Miniatures

By: August Strindberg

Preface: Maximilian Harden, the well?known critic, writes in the Zukunft (7th September 1907) of the Historical Miniatures: ?A very interesting book, as might be expected, for it is Strindberg?s. And I am bold enough to say a book which should and must be successful with the public. The writer is not here concerned with Sweden, nor with Natural History. A philosopher and poet here describes the visions which a study of the history of mankind has called up before his inne...

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

By: Henry David Thoreau

Where'er thou sail'st who sailed with me, / Though now thou climbest loftier mounts, / And fairer rivers dost ascend, / Be thou my Muse, my Brother—. / I am bound, I am bound, for a distant shore, / By a lonely isle, by a far Azore, / There it is, there it is, the treasure I seek, / On the barren sands of a desolate creek.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Round the Red Lamp : Being Facts and Fancies of Medical Life

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

I quite recognise the force of your objection that an invalid or a woman in weak health would get no good from stories which attempt to treat some features of medical life with a certain amount of realism. If you deal with this life at all, however, and if you are anxious to make your doctors something more than marionettes, it is quite essential that you should paint the darker side, since it is that which is principally presented to the surgeon or physician. He sees ma...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Sea-Raiders

By: Herbert George Wells

Until the extraordinary affair at Sidmouth, the peculiar species Haploteuthis ferox was known to science only generically, on the strength of a half-digested tentacle obtained near the Azores, and a decaying body pecked by birds and nibbled by fish, found early in 1896 by Mr Jennings, near Land's End. In no department of zoological science, indeed, are we quite so much in the dark as with regard to the deep-sea cephalopods. A mere accident, for instance, it was that led ...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.