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The Dark Flower

By: John Galsworthy

Excerpt: Part 1. Spring I He walked along Holywell that afternoon of early June with his short gown drooping down his arms, and no cap on his thick dark hair. A youth of middle height, and built as if he had come of two very different strains, one sturdy, the other wiry and light. His face, too, was a curious blend, for, though it was strongly formed, its expression was rather soft and moody. His eyes ? dark grey, with a good deal of light in them, and very black lashes ...

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Quinze Jours en Egypte

By: Fernand Neuray

Excerpt: DE BRUXELLES AU CAIRE Depuis le mois de decembre 1907, la route de Bruxelles au Caire est raccourcie de deux jours. Cinq jours au lieu de sept. On peut meme la faire en quatre jours et demi. Mais il faut que les vents et la mer s'y pretent. Plusieurs de nos confreres n'ont quitte Bruxelles que le vendredi 6 decembre, a midi, pour arriver a Marseille le samedi 7, vers neuf heures du matin, un peu avant le depart de l'Heliopolis. Le 10, a six heures du soir, le na...

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Southern Poems

By: Charles William Kent

Preface: THESE poems are selected from the wide range of Southern poetry, that the South?s contribution to our national literature may be in part apprehended. For a long time the productions of Southern writers were so inaccessible that authors of text?books on American Literature were disposed to neglect them altogether; and even later the admission of any Southern author, save one or two of international fame, was somewhat grudging and apologetic. In recent years, espe...

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Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, Volume 5

By: Madame Campan

CHAPTER I: The ever-memorable oath of the States General, taken at the Tennis Court of Versailles, was followed by the royal sitting of the 23d of June. In this seance the King declared that the Orders must vote separately, and threatened, if further obstacles were met with, to himself act for the good of the people. The Queen looked on M. Necker's not accompanying the King as treachery or criminal cowardice: she said that he had converted a remedy into poison; that bein...

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The Poetical Works of O.W. Holmes, Volume 11

By: Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

Excerpt: ?WHO gave this cup?? The secret thou wouldst steal Its brimming flood forbids it to reveal: No mortal?s eye shall read it till he first Cool the red throat of thirst. If on the golden floor one draught remain, Trust me, thy careful search will be in vain; Not till the bowl is emptied shalt thou know The names enrolled below. Deeper than Truth lies buried in her well Those modest names the graven letters spell Hide from the sight; but wait, and thou shalt see Who the good angels be ...

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On the Subject of the Soul

By: Gregory Thaumaturgus

You have instructed us, most excellent Tatian, (2) to forward for your use a discourse upon the soul, laying it out in effective demonstrations. And this you have asked us to do without making use of the testimonies of Scripture,—a method which is opened to us, and which, to those who seek the pious mind, proves a manner of setting forth doctrine more convincing than any reasoning of man. (3) You have said, however, that you desire this, not with a view to your own full ...

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Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahrebuch 3

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Excerpt: Als Wilhelm des Morgens sich nach Mignon im Hause umsah, fand er sie nicht, hoerte aber, dass sie frueh mit Melina ausgegangen sei, welcher sich, um die Garderobe und die uebrigen Theatergeraetschaften zu uebernehmen, beizeiten aufgemacht hatte.

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Heroes and Romantics of Our Times : A Comedy in One Act

By: Frank J. Morlock

Excerpt: THE scene takes place in the office of the Sheriff in Atkinsville, a mid?sized American town somewhere in the heartland of middle America. The stage is empty when the curtain rises. We are in the office of Sheriff Jack Dalton. On the walls are posters for missing persons and criminals and duty rosters. The office contains a desk, several chairs and a rather fancy couch. After a moment Corporal Dobbs and Dillon pass through. It is late at night. Dobbs Sheriff Dal...

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Abolishing of Christianity in England

By: Jonathan Swift

I AM very sensible what a weakness and presumption it is to reason against the general humour and disposition of the world. I remember it was with great justice, and a due regard to the freedom, both of the public and the press, forbidden upon several penalties to write, or discourse, or lay wagers against the—even before it was confirmed by Parliament; because that was looked upon as a design to oppose the current of the people, which, besides the folly of it, is a mani...

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: THE Taming of the Shrew Actus primus. Scaena Prima. Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith Host. A paire of stockes you rogue Beg. Y'are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa Host. You will not pay for the glasses you haue burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Ieronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme thee Ho...

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From Mountain Interval

By: Robert Frost

Excerpt: THE ROAD NOT TAKEN. Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I k...

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Only an Incident

By: Grace Denio Litchfield

Excerpt: Chapter 1. JOPPA. Joppa was the very centre of all things. That was the opening clause in the creed of every well?educated and right?thinking Joppite. Geographically, however, it was not the centre of any thing, being considerably off from the great lines of railway travel, but possessing two little independent branch roads of its own, that connected it with all the world, or rather that connected all the world with it.

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Travels in the Interior of Africa - Volume 1

By: Mungo Park

INTRODUCTION: Mungo Park was born on the 10th of September, 1771, the son of a farmer at Fowlshiels, near Selkirk. After studying medicine in Edinburgh, he went out, at the age of twenty-one, assistant-surgeon in a ship bound for the East Indies. When he came back the African Society was in want of an explorer, to take the place of Major Houghton, who had died. Mungo Park volunteered, was accepted, and in his twenty-fourth year, on the 22nd of May, 1795, he sailed for th...

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An Inland Voyage

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Preface: To equip so small a book with a preface is, I am half afraid, to sin against proportion. But a preface is more than an author can resist, for it is the reward of his labours. When the foundation stone is laid, the architect appears with his plans, and struts for an hour before the public eye. So with the writer in his preface: he may have never a word to say, but he must show himself for a moment in the portico, hat in hand, and with an urbane demeanour. It is b...

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The Race of Orven

By: M. P. Shiel

Never without grief and pain could I remember the fate of Prince Zaleski—victim of a too importunate, too unfortunate Love, which the fulgor of the throne itself could not abash; exile perforce from his native land, and voluntary exile from the rest of men! Having renounced the world, over which, lurid and inscrutable as a falling star, he had passed, the world quickly ceased to wonder at him; and even I, to whom, more than to another, the workings of that just and passi...

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Roman History, Books Iiii

By: Titus Livius

Preface: Whether in tracing the history of the Roman people, from the foundation of the city, I shall employ myself to a useful purpose, I am neither very certain, nor, if I were, dare I say; inasmuch as I observe that it is both an old and hackneyed practice, later authors always supposing that they will either adduce something more authentic in the facts, or, that they will excel the less polished ancients in their style of writing. Be that as it may, it will, at all e...

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The Tower Room

By: Arthur Elck

There were many wonderful things that aroused our childish fantasy, when Balint Orzo and I were boys, but none so much as the old tower that stands a few feet from the castle, shadowy and mysterious. It is an old, curious, square tower, and at the brink of its notched edge there is a shingled helmet which was erected by one of the late Orzos. There is many and many a legend told about this old tower. A rumor exists that it has a secret chamber into which none is permitte...

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Death's Premium

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: EARLY dusk was deepening the grimy front of the old Hotel Thurmont when Ronald Parron sidled in from the front street. With quick, nervous eyes he darted a look about the lobby, then approached the desk and asked for the key to Room 312. Parron was still glancing about after he received the key. The clerk took another look into the box, then told him: ?No messages, Mr. Hotchkiss.? At the mention of the name, Parron gave a jumpy start. He forced a smile to his tw...

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Saved by the Lifeboat

By: R.M. Ballantyne

Excerpt: THE WRECK IN THE BAY. On a dark November afternoon, not many years ago, Captain Boyns sat smoking his pipe in his own chimney?corner, gazing with a somewhat anxious expression at the fire. There was cause for anxiety, for there raged at the time one of the fiercest storms that ever blew on the shores of England. The wind was howling in the chimney with wild fury; slates and tiles were being swept off the roofs of the fishermen?s huts and whirled up into the air ...

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The Admirable Crichton

By: James Matthew Barrie

Excerpt: ACT I. AT LOAM HOUSE, MAYFAIR A moment before the curtain rises, the Hon. Ernest Woolley drives up to the door of Loam House in Mayfair. There is a happy smile on his pleasant, insignificant face, and this presumably means that he is thinking of himself. He is too busy over nothing, this man about town, to be always thinking of himself, but, on the other hand, he almost never thinks of any other person. Probably Ernest?s great moment is when he wakes of a mornin...

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