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Northanger Abbey

By: Jane Austen

THIS little work was finished in the year 1803, and intended for immediate publication. It was disposed of to a bookseller, it was even advertised, and why the business proceeded no farther, the author has never been able to learn. That any bookseller should think it worth-while to purchase what he did not think it worth-while to publish seems extraordinary. But with this, neither the author nor the public have any other concern than as some observation is necessary upon...

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Evolve Game Developers Conference

By: Alan Yu

Reference

Excerpt: Electronic Arts: Mark Cerny; Cerny Games; Doug Church; Eidos Interactive; Mark DeLoura; Sony Computer; Entertainment America; Alex Dunne; Julian Eggebrecht; Factor 5; Chris Hecker; Definition Six; Elaine Hodgson; Incredible Technologies; Rob Huebner; Nihilistic Software; Cyrus Lum; Inevitable Entertainment; Masaya Matsuura; NanaOn - Sha; Julien Merceron; Ubi Soft Entertainment; Tetsuya Mizuguchi; David Perry; Shiny Entertainment; Jason Rubin; Naughty Dog; Jez Sa...

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Politics and the English Language

By: George Orwell

Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that...

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The Koran : Women

By: Prophet Muhammad

004.001 O mankind! Be careful of your duty to your Lord Who created you from a single soul and from it created its mate and from them twain hath spread abroad a multitude of men and women. Be careful of your duty toward Allah in Whom ye claim (your rights) of one another, and toward the wombs (that bare you). Lo! Allah hath been a watcher over you. 004.002 Give unto orphans their wealth. Exchange not the good for the bad (in your management thereof) nor absorb their weal...

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Around the World in Eighty Days

By: Jules Verne

Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814. He was one of the most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention; an enigmatical personage, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People said that he resembled Byron -- at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thou...

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A Midsummer Nights Dream

By: William Shakespeare

Thy Subject England, nay, the World, admires: / Which Heaven grant still increase: O may your Praise, / Multiplying with your hours, your Fame still raise; / Embrace your Counsel; Love, with Faith, them guide, / That both, as one, bench by each other's side. / So may your life pass on and run so even, / That your firm zeal plant you a Throne in Heaven, / Where smiling Angels shall your guardians be / From blemished Traitors, stained with Perjury: / And as the night's inf...

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Early Australian Voyages

By: John Pinkerton

In the days of Plato, imagination found its way, before the mariners, to a new world across the Atlantic, and fabled an Atlantis where America now stands. In the days of Francis Bacon, imagination of the English found its way to the great Southern Continent before the Portuguese or Dutch sailors had sight of it, and it was the home of those wise students of God and nature to whom Bacon gave his New Atlantis. The discoveries of America date from the close of the fifteenth...

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A Journey to the Interior of the Earth

By: Jules Verne

PREFACE: THE Voyages Extraordinaires of M. Jules Verne deserve to be made widely known in English-speaking countries by means of carefully prepared translations. Witty and ingenious adaptations of the researches and discoveries of modern science to the popular taste, which demands that these should be presented to ordinary readers in the lighter form of cleverly mingled truth and fiction, these books will assuredly be read with profit and delight, especially by English y...

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Personalizing Search in Digital Libraries

By: Dr. H. J. Van den Herik

Phenomenons like the WorldWideWeb and Usenet have given us access to a gigantic and growing amount of information. The amount of information available to us has, already, grown too large to retain an oversight of it. This creates a problem: if we are not aware of what knowledge we have access to, then how do we make use of that knowledge, how do we find the proverbial needle in the haystack? A solution is to create tools that help us find the information we need, so that...

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The Antichrist

By: Friedrich Nietzsche

This book belongs to the most rare of men. Perhaps not one of them is yet alive. It is possible that they may be among those who understand my Zarathustra: how could I confound myself with those who are now sprouting ears? -- First the day after tomorrow must come for me. Some men are born posthumously. The conditions under which any one understands me, and necessarily understands me -- I know them only too well. Even to endure my seriousness, my passion, he must carry i...

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Twenty-Two Goblins

INTRODUCTION: On the bank of the Godavari River is a kingdom called the Abiding Kingdom. There lived the son of King Victory, the famous King Triple-victory, mighty as the king of the gods. As this king sat in judgment, a monk called Patience brought him every day one piece of fruit as an expression of homage. And the king took it and gave it each day to the treasurer who stood near. Thus twelve years passed. Now one day the monk came to court, gave the king a piece of f...

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The Philosophy of Despair

By: David Starr Jordan

This poem of Omar and of Fitzgerald is perhaps our best expression of the sadness and the grandeur of insoluble problems. It is the sweetness of philosophical sorrow which has no kinship with misery or distress. In the strains of the saddest music the soul finds the keenest delight. The same sweet, sorrowful pleasure is felt in the play of the mind about the riddles which it cannot solve. In the presence of the infinite problem of life, the voice of Science is dumb, for ...

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How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day

By: Arnold Bennett

I have received a large amount of correspondence concerning this small work, and many reviews of it -- some of them nearly as long as the book itself -- have been printed. But scarcely any of the comment has been adverse. Some people have objected to a frivolity of tone; but as the tone is not, in my opinion, at all frivolous, this objection did not impress me; and had no weightier reproach been put forward I might almost have been persuaded that the volume was flawless!...

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The Philosophy of Misery

By: Joseph Pierre Proudhon

INTRODUCTION: Before entering upon the subject-matter of these new memoirs, I must explain an hypothesis which will undoubtedly seem strange, but in the absence of which it is impossible for me to proceed intelligibly: I mean the hypothesis of a God. To suppose God, it will be said, is to deny him. Why do you not affirm him? Is it my fault if belief in Divinity has become a suspected opinion; if the bare suspicion of a Supreme Being is already noted as evidence of a weak...

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The Modern Husband

By: Henry Fielding

While the Peace of Europe, and the Lives and Fortunes of so great a Part of Mankind, depend on Your Counsels, it may be thought an Offence against the publick Good to divert, by Trifles of this Nature, any of those Moments, which are so sacred to the Welfare of our Country. But however ridicul'd or exploded the Muses may be, in an Age when their greatest Favourites are liable to the Censure and Correction of every Boy or Idiot, who shall have it in his power to satisfy t...

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Appreciations

By: Walter Horatio Pater

STYLE: SINCE all progress of mind consists for the most part in differentiation, in the resolution of an obscure and complex object into its component aspects, it is surely the stupidest of losses to confuse things which right reason has put asunder, to lose the sense of achieved distinctions, the distinction between poetry and prose, for instance, or, to speak more exactly, between the laws and characteristic excellences of verse and prose composition. On the other hand...

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Antonina, Or the Fall of Rome

By: Wilkie Collins

IN preparing to compose a fiction founded on history, the writer of these pages thought it no necessary requisite of such a work that the principal characters appearing in it should be drawn from the historical personages of the period. On the contrary, he felt that some very weighty objections attached to this plan of composition. He knew well that it obliged a writer to add largely from invention to what was actually known -- to fill in with the coloring of romantic fa...

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Driven from Home

By: Horatio Alger, Jr.

CHAPTER I: A boy of sixteen, with a small gripsack in his hand, trudged along the country road. He was of good height for his age, strongly built, and had a frank, attractive face. He was naturally of a cheerful temperament, but at present his face was grave, and not without a shade of anxiety. This can hardly be a matter of surprise when we consider that he was thrown upon his own resources, and that his available capital consisted of thirty-seven cents in money, in add...

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The Call of the Wild

By: Jack London

Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tidewater dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with s...

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As You Like It

By: William Shakespeare

As I sadness. My brother Jaques he keeps at school, and report speaks goldenly of his profit: for my part, he keeps me rustically at home unkept; for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth, that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better; for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their countenance seems to take from me: he lets me feed with his hinds, bars me the place of a brother, and, as much as in him lies, mines my avoid it.

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