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Other People Who Read Mr. Crewe's Career, Volume 2 Also Read


 
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A Smaller History of Greece

By: William Smith

Excerpt: Chapter 1. GEOGRAPHY OF GREECE. Greece is the southern portion of a great peninsula of Europe, washed on three sides by the Mediterranean Sea. It is bounded on the north by the Cambunian mountains, which separate it from Macedonia. It extends from the fortieth degree of latitude to the thirty?sixth, its greatest length being not more than 250 English miles, and its greatest breadth only 180. Its surface is considerably less than that of Portugal. This small area...

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The Mistletoe Bough

By: Anthony Trollope

Excerpt: THE point in dispute was one very delicate in its nature, hardly to be discussed in all its bearings, even in fiction, and the very mention of which between mother and daughter showed a great amount of close confidence between them.

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Selected Stories

By: Bret Harte

Introduction: The life of Bret Harte divides itself, without adventitious forcing, into four quite distinct parts. First, we have the precocious boyhood, with its eager response to the intellectual stimulation of cultured parents; young Bret Harte assimilated Greek with amazing facility; devoured voraciously the works of Shakespeare, Dickens, Irving, Froissart, Cervantes, Fielding; and, with creditable success, attempted various forms of composition. Then, compelled by e...

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The Mummy's Foot

By: Théophile Gautier

I had entered, in an idle mood, the shop of one of those curiosity-venders, who are called marchands de bric-a-brac in that Parisian ar got which is so perfectly unintelligible elsewhere in France. You have doubtless glanced occasionally through the windows of some of these shops, which have become so numerous now that it is fashionable to buy antiquated furniture, and that every petty stock-broker thinks he must have his chambre au moyen age.

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The Countess Ida : A Tale of Berlin

By: Theodore S. Fay

Excerpt: It was on a pleasant October evening, in the year 1790, that the public diligence which ran between Hamburg and Berlin drew up in the evening at the post of the former town preparatory to starting. The clock struck nine. The four strong horses clattered with their heavy hoofs against the pavement, as if impatient to be off. The conducteur blew an inspiring blast upon his horn, and a small but observant circle of by?standers were collected to gaze on the company ...

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Somewhere in France

By: Richard Harding Davis

Excerpt: Marie Gessler, known as Marie Chaumontel, Jeanne d'Avrechy, the Countess d'Aurillac, was German. Her father, who served through the Franco?Prussian War, was a German spy. It was from her mother she learned to speak French sufficiently well to satisfy even an Academician and, among Parisians, to pass as one. Both her parents were dead. Before they departed, knowing they could leave their daughter nothing save their debts, they had had her trained as a nurse. But ...

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Manalive

By: Chesterton, Gilbert Keith, 1874-1936

A wind sprang high in the west, like a wave of unreasonable happiness, and tore eastward across England, trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea. It a million holes and corners it refreshed a man like a flagon, and astonished him like a blow. In the inmost chambers of intricate and embowered houses it woke like a domestic explosion, littering the floor with some professor's papers till they seemed as precious as fugitive, or blow...

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To the Last Man

By: Zane Grey

FOREWORD: It was inevitable that in my efforts to write romantic history of the great West I should at length come to the story of a feud. For long I have steered clear of this rock. But at last I have reached it and must go over it, driven by my desire to chronicle the stirring events of pioneer days. Even to-day it is not possible to travel into the remote corners of the West without seeing the lives of people still affected by a fighting past. How can the truth be tol...

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Sandra Belloni

By: George Meredith

That the Tinleys really were their match, they acknowledged, upon the admission of the despicable nature of the game. The Tinleys had winged a dreadful shaft at them; not in itself to be dreaded, but that it struck a weak point; it was a common shot that exploded a magazine; and for a time it quite upset their social policy, causing them to act like simple young ladies who feel things and resent them. The ladies of Brookfield had let it be known that, in their privacy to...

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Two Countries

By: Henry James

Excerpt: I. WHEN he reached the hotel, Macarthy Grice was apprised, to his great disappointment, of the fact that his mother and sister were absent for the day, and he reproached himself with not having been more definite in announcing his arrival to them in advance. It was a little his nature to expect people to know things about himself that he had not told them, and to be vexed when he found they didn?t know them. I will not go so far as to say that he was inordinatel...

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The Woman at Eighteen-Mile

By: Mary Austin

Excerpt: I HAD long wished to write a story of Death Valley that should be its final word. It was to be so chosen from the limited sort of incidents that could occur there, so charged with the still ferocity of its moods, that I should at length be quit of its obsession, free to concern myself about other affairs. And from the moment of hearing of the finding of Lang?s body at Dead Man?s Spring I knew I had struck upon the trail of that story. It was a teamster who told ...

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Peter Rugg, The Missing Man

By: William Austin

Excerpt: SIR, Agreeably to my promise, I now relate to you all the particulars of the lost man and child which I have been able to collect. It is entirely owing to the humane interest you seemed to take in the report, that I have pursued the inquiry to the following result.

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America through the Spectacles of an Oriental Diplomat

By: Wu Tingfang

Introduction: While this book is by no means famous, it is a remarkable chance to look at America of 1914 through the eyes of an outsider. Wu Tingfang shows evidence of having thought through many issues of relevance to the United States, and while some of his thoughts are rather odd -- such as his suggestion that the title of President be replaced by the title of Emperor; and others are unfortunately wrong -- such as his hopes for peace, written on the eve of the First ...

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Miscellaneous Essays

By: Thomas De Quincey

Excerpt: On The Knocking At The Gate, In Macbeth. From my boyish days I had always felt a great perplexity on one point in Macbeth. It was this: the knocking at the gate, which succeeds to the murder of Duncan, produced to my feelings an effect for which I never could account. The effect was, that it reflected back upon the murder a peculiar awfulness and a depth of solemnity; yet, however obstinately I endeavored with my understanding to comprehend this, for many years ...

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Varney the Vampire; Or, The Feast of Blood, Volume Iii

By: Thomas Preskett Prest

Excerpt: A week or more had passed away since the visit of the attorney to Mrs. Meredith, and yet the latter saw not a sufficient reason why she should send for her friend. Things were not ripe yet; the colonel had, it was true, been melting gradually; but then to progress ever so little, was a great point in anything ? no matter what it is ? something gained.

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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction Series

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: AKENSIDE Gentle, courteous, and patient reader?to understand the above plan, it is requisite that you carry your mind?s eye back to those troublous times when men enjoyed no protection, but in opposing force to force; and to a period when every man?s house was his castle, though not in the metaphorical sense we have since been accustomed to apply these words, viz. to the protection and security of British subjects. Few portions of our island have been more amply...

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A Torture by Hope

By: Jean-Marie-Mathias-Philippe-Auguste, Comte de Villiers de L'Isle-Adam, 1838-1889

BELOW the vaults of the Official of Saragossa one night-fall long ago, the venerable Pedro Arbuez d'Espila, sixth Prior of the Dominicans of Segovia, third Grand Inquisitor of Spain—followed by a fra redemptor (master-torturer), and preceded by two familiars of the Holy Office holding lanterns—descended towards a secret dungeon. The lock of a massive door creaked; they entered a stifling in pace, where the little light that came from above revealed an instrument of tortu...

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The Chinese Boy and Girl

By: Isaac Taylor Headland

No thorough study of Chinese child life can be made until the wall of Chinese exclusiveness is broken down and the homes of the East are thrown open to the people of the West. Glimpses of that life however, are available, sufficient in number and character to give a fairly good idea of what it must be. The playground is by no means always hidden, least of all when it is the street. The Chinese nurse brings her Chinese rhymes, stories and games into the foreigner's home f...

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Don Juan

By: Lord Byron

BOB SOUTHEY! You 're a poet- Poet-laureate, And representative of all the race, Although 't is true that you turn'd out a Tory at Last,- yours has lately been a common case; And now, my Epic Renegade! what are ye at? With all the Lakers, in and out of place? A nest of tuneful persons, to my eye Like 'four and twenty Blackbirds in a pye;'...

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Atlantis : The Antediluvian World

By: Ignatius Donnelly

Excerpt: Part 1. The HISTORY OF ATLANTIS. Chapter 1. THE PURPOSE OF THE BOOK. This book is an attempt to demonstrate several distinct and novel propositions. These are: 1. That there once existed in the Atlantic Ocean, opposite the mouth of the Mediterranean Sea, a large island, which was the remnant of an Atlantic continent, and known to the ancient world as Atlantis. 2. That the description of this island given by Plato is not, as has been long supposed, fable, but ver...

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