World Library  

Other People Who Read Munds Mulberries Also Read


 
  • Cover Image

The Point of View

By: Henry James

I. FROM MISS AURORA CHURCH, AT SEA, TO MISS WHITESIDE, IN PARIS My dear child, the bromide of sodium (if that's what you call it) proved perfectly useless. I don't mean that it did me no good, but that I never had occasion to take the bottle out of my bag. It might have done wonders for me if I had needed it; but I didn't, simply because I have been a wonder myself. Will you believe that I have spent the whole voyage on deck, in the most animated conversation and exercis...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Pension Beaurepas

By: Henry James

I was not rich -- on the contrary; and I had been told the Pension Beaurepas was cheap. I had, moreover, been told that a boarding- house is a capital place for the study of human nature. I had a fancy for a literary career, and a friend of mine had said to me, If you mean to write you ought to go and live in a boarding-house; there is no other such place to pick up material. I had read something of this kind in a letter addressed by Stendhal to his sister: I have a pass...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Patagonia

By: Henry James

The houses were dark in the August night and the perspective of Beacon Street, with its double chain of lamps, was a foreshortened desert. The club on the hill alone, from its semi-cylindrical front, projected a glow upon the dusky vagueness of the Common, and as I passed it I heard in the hot stillness the click of a pair of billiard-balls. As every one was out of town perhaps the servants, in the extravagance of their leisure, were profaning the tables. The heat was in...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Papers

By: Henry James

There was a longish period— the dense duration of a London winter, cheered, if cheered it could be called, with lurid electric, with fierce 'incandescent' flares and glares— when they repeatedly met, at feeding-time, in a small and not quite savoury pothouse a stone's-throw from the Strand. They talked always of pothouses, of feeding-time— by which they meant any hour between one and four of the afternoon; they talked of most things, even of some of the greatest, in a ma...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Papers

By: Henry James

There was a longish period -- the dense duration of a London winter, cheered, if cheered it could be called, with lurid electric, with fierce 'incandescent' flares and glares -- when they repeatedly met, at feeding-time, in a small and not quite savoury pothouse a stone's-throw from the Strand. They talked always of pothouses, of feeding-time -- by which they meant any hour between one and four of the afternoon; they talked of most things, even of some of the greatest, i...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Middle Years

By: Henry James

The April day was soft and bright, and poor Dencombe, happy in the conceit of reasserted strength, stood in the garden of the hotel, comparing, with a deliberation in which however there was still something of languor, the attractions of easy strolls. He liked the feeling of the south so far as you could have it in the north, he liked the sandy cliffs and the clustered pines, he liked even the colourless sea. Bournemouth as a health-resort had sounded like a mere adverti...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Marriages

By: Henry James

Won't you stay a little longer? the hostess asked while she held the girl's hand and smiled. It's too early for every one to go -- it's too absurd. Mrs. Churchley inclined her head to one side and looked gracious; she flourished about her face, in a vaguely protecting sheltering way, an enormous fan of red feathers. Everything in her composition, for Adela Chart, was enormous. She had big eyes, big teeth, big shoulders, big hands, big rings and bracelets, big jewels of e...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Liar

By: Henry James

The train was half an hour late and the drive from the station longer than he had supposed, so that when he reached the house its inmates had dispersed to dress for dinner and he was conducted straight to his room. The curtains were drawn in this asylum, the candles were lighted, the fire was bright, and when the servant had quickly put out his clothes the comfortable little place became suggestive — seemed to promise a pleasant house, a various party, talks, acquaintanc...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Lesson of the Master

By: Henry James

He had been told the ladies were at church, but this was corrected by what he saw from the top of the steps - they descended from a great height in two arms, with a circular sweep of the most charming effect - at the threshold of the door which, from the long bright gallery, overlooked the immense lawn. Three gentlemen, on the grass, at a distance, sat under the great trees, while the fourth figure showed a crimson dress that told as a bit of colour amid the fresh rich g...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Jolly Corner

By: Henry James

I EVERY ONE asks me what I 'think' of everything, said Spencer Brydon; and I make answer as I can -- begging or dodging the question, putting them off with any nonsense. It wouldn't matter to any of them really, he went on, for, even were it possible to meet in that stand-and-deliver way so silly a demand on so big a subject, my 'thoughts' would still be almost altogether about something that concerns only myself. He was talking to Miss Staverton, with whom for a couple ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Great Good Place

By: Henry James

George Dane had opened his eyes to a bright new day, the face of nature well washed by last night's downpour and shining as with high spirits, good resolutions, lively intentions—the great glare of recommencement in short fixed in his patch of sky. He had sat up late to finish work—arrears overwhelming, then at last had gone to bed with the pile but little reduced. He was now to return to it after the pause of the night; but he could only look at it, for the time, over t...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Great Condition

By: Henry James

Ah there, confound it! said Bertram Braddle when he had once more frowned, so far as he could frown, over his telegram. I must catch the train if I'm to have my morning clear in town. And it's a most abominable nuisance! Do you mean on account of — a — her? asked, after a minute's silent sympathy, the friend to whom — in the hall of the hotel, still bestrewn with the appurtenances of the newly disembarked — he had thus querulously addressed himself. He looked hard for an...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Golden Bowl : Volume 2

By: Henry James

It was not till many days had passed that the Princess began to accept the idea of having done, a little, something she was not always doing, or indeed that of having listened to any inward voice that spoke in a new tone. Yet these instinctive postponements of reflection were the fruit, positively, of recognitions and perceptions already active; of the sense, above all, that she had made, at a particular hour, made by the mere touch of her hand, a difference in the situa...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Golden Bowl : Volume 1

By: Henry James

The Prince had always liked his London, when it had come to him; he was one of the modern Romans who find by the Thames a more convincing image of the truth of the ancient state than any they have left by the Tiber. Brought up on the legend of the City to which the world paid tribute, he recognised in the present London much more than in contemporary Rome the real dimensions of such a case. If it was a question of an Imperium, he said to himself, and if one wished, as a ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Golden Bowl

By: Henry James

PREFACE: Among many matters thrown into relief by a refreshed acquaintance with The Golden Bowl what perhaps most stands out for me is the still marked inveteracy of a certain indirect and oblique view of my presented action; unless indeed I make up my mind to call this mode of treatment, on the contrary, any superficial appearance notwithstanding, the very straightest and closest possible. I have already betrayed, as an accepted habit, and even to extravagance commented...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Given Case

By: Henry James

Barton Reeve waited, with outward rigour and inward rage, till every one had gone: there was in particular an objectionable, travelled, superior young man — a young man with a long neck and bad shoes, especially great on Roumania — whom he was determined to outstay. He could only wonder the while whether he most hated designed or unconscious unpleasantness. It was a Sunday afternoon, the time in the week when, for some subtle reason, 'such people' — Reeve freely generali...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Ghostly Rental

By: Henry James

I was in my twenty-second year, and I had just left college. I was at liberty to choose my career, and I chose it with much promptness. I afterward renounced it, in truth, with equal ardor, but I have never regretted those two youthful years of perplexed and excited, but also of agreeable and fruitful experiment. I had a taste for theology, and during my college term I had been an admiring reader of Dr. Channing. This was theology of a grateful and succulent savor; it se...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Codex Alimentarius Draft Code of Hygienic Practice for Meat

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: 1. Meat has traditionally been viewed as a vehicle for a significant proportion of human food-borne disease. Although the spectrum of meat-borne diseases of public health importance has changed with changing production and processing systems, continuation of the problem has been well illustrated in recent years by human surveillance studies of specific meat-borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp ... Campylobacter spp. and Yersinia enter...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Role of Governments and Other Regulatory Authorities in Meat H...

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Meat is an essential part of the global food supply and an important element of agricultural commerce and trade in many countries. Commensurate with this, food-borne disease can be a significant public health problem, and inadequate food quality and certification seriously limits the functioning of the marketplace. Meat production can also act as a vehicle for transmission of diseases of animal health importance. For these reasons, civil society demands that gov...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Control System for Processing Operations the Hazard Analysis and C...

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is the most widely used and internationally accepted food safety management system in the world. The main goal of applying HACCP plans in abattoirs is to ensure that animals are slaughtered and dressed under conditions that mean the meat will carry minimal public health risk. A HACCP plan has the following advantages ... it is proactive and preventive ... it is owned by the meat plant ... it is system...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.