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A Middle English Vocabulary. Designed for Use with Sisam's Fourtee...

By: Tolkien, J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel), 1892-1973; Sisam, Kenneth
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The Power of Our Words

By: Liz Mcgrath

Do you know that an empowering word can spark ideas, open doors, change attitudes, and create solutions? Words can do all these things and much more. They have the potency to redefine personalities, lives, and entire communities. Just think of some of the things words are used for every day: To communicate a message To express a feeling To interact with others To associate meaning, intention, and tone To record history To tell stories And so much more! When used the righ...

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Jawaharlal Nehru a Biography

By: Frank Moraes
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Le Theatre Indien : No. 83

By: Levi, Sylvain, 1863-1935

Secret societies ; Caussideiere, Marc, 1808-1861

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A Treatise on the Law of Judgments : Including the Doctrine of Res...

By: Henry Campbell Black
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The Taittiriya-Upanishad

By: Sankaracarya; Suresvaracarya; Madhava, Son of Chavunda, D. 1391; Mahadeva Sastri, Alladi, D. 1926; Madhava, D. 1386
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Between the Acts

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: It was a summer's night and they were talking, in the big room with the windows open to the garden, about the cesspool. The county council had promised to bring water to the village, but they hadn't. Mrs. Haines, the wife of the gentleman farmer, a goosefaced woman with eyes protruding as if they saw something to gobble in the gutter, said affectedly: What a subject to talk about on a night like this!

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Mrs. Dalloway

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. For Lucy had her work cut out for her. The doors would be taken off their hinges; Rumpelmayer's men were coming. And then, thought Clarissa Dalloway, what a morning--fresh as if issued to children on a beach.

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Jacob's Room

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: So of course, wrote Betty Flanders, pressing her heels rather deeper in the sand, there was nothing for it but to leave. Slowly welling from the point of her gold nib, pale blue ink dissolved the full stop; for there her pen stuck; her eyes fixed, and tears slowly filled them. The entire bay quivered; the lighthouse wobbled; and she had the illusion that the mast of Mr. Connor's little yacht was bending like a wax candle in the sun. She winked quickly. Accidents...

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Kuvalaynanda-Krik. Kuvalaynanda Kriks or the Memorial Verses of Ap...

By: Appayya Dkita; Subrahmanya Sarma, P. R.

Binder's title: Bampton lectures. 1807 ;

Sects ; Church of England ; Reformation ; Sermons, English

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Bedlam Boyz

By: Ellen Guon

Excerpt: Chapter one sunset boulevard was a blur of lights and noise, too many radios and car stereos, too many people talking and shouting and laughing. Kayla jammed her hands in the pockets of her denim jacket and wished all of it would just go away.

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The Point of View

By: Henry James

I. FROM MISS AURORA CHURCH, AT SEA, TO MISS WHITESIDE, IN PARIS My dear child, the bromide of sodium (if that's what you call it) proved perfectly useless. I don't mean that it did me no good, but that I never had occasion to take the bottle out of my bag. It might have done wonders for me if I had needed it; but I didn't, simply because I have been a wonder myself. Will you believe that I have spent the whole voyage on deck, in the most animated conversation and exercis...

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The Pension Beaurepas

By: Henry James

I was not rich -- on the contrary; and I had been told the Pension Beaurepas was cheap. I had, moreover, been told that a boarding- house is a capital place for the study of human nature. I had a fancy for a literary career, and a friend of mine had said to me, If you mean to write you ought to go and live in a boarding-house; there is no other such place to pick up material. I had read something of this kind in a letter addressed by Stendhal to his sister: I have a pass...

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The Patagonia

By: Henry James

The houses were dark in the August night and the perspective of Beacon Street, with its double chain of lamps, was a foreshortened desert. The club on the hill alone, from its semi-cylindrical front, projected a glow upon the dusky vagueness of the Common, and as I passed it I heard in the hot stillness the click of a pair of billiard-balls. As every one was out of town perhaps the servants, in the extravagance of their leisure, were profaning the tables. The heat was in...

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The Papers

By: Henry James

There was a longish period— the dense duration of a London winter, cheered, if cheered it could be called, with lurid electric, with fierce 'incandescent' flares and glares— when they repeatedly met, at feeding-time, in a small and not quite savoury pothouse a stone's-throw from the Strand. They talked always of pothouses, of feeding-time— by which they meant any hour between one and four of the afternoon; they talked of most things, even of some of the greatest, in a ma...

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The Papers

By: Henry James

There was a longish period -- the dense duration of a London winter, cheered, if cheered it could be called, with lurid electric, with fierce 'incandescent' flares and glares -- when they repeatedly met, at feeding-time, in a small and not quite savoury pothouse a stone's-throw from the Strand. They talked always of pothouses, of feeding-time -- by which they meant any hour between one and four of the afternoon; they talked of most things, even of some of the greatest, i...

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The Middle Years

By: Henry James

The April day was soft and bright, and poor Dencombe, happy in the conceit of reasserted strength, stood in the garden of the hotel, comparing, with a deliberation in which however there was still something of languor, the attractions of easy strolls. He liked the feeling of the south so far as you could have it in the north, he liked the sandy cliffs and the clustered pines, he liked even the colourless sea. Bournemouth as a health-resort had sounded like a mere adverti...

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The Marriages

By: Henry James

Won't you stay a little longer? the hostess asked while she held the girl's hand and smiled. It's too early for every one to go -- it's too absurd. Mrs. Churchley inclined her head to one side and looked gracious; she flourished about her face, in a vaguely protecting sheltering way, an enormous fan of red feathers. Everything in her composition, for Adela Chart, was enormous. She had big eyes, big teeth, big shoulders, big hands, big rings and bracelets, big jewels of e...

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The Liar

By: Henry James

The train was half an hour late and the drive from the station longer than he had supposed, so that when he reached the house its inmates had dispersed to dress for dinner and he was conducted straight to his room. The curtains were drawn in this asylum, the candles were lighted, the fire was bright, and when the servant had quickly put out his clothes the comfortable little place became suggestive — seemed to promise a pleasant house, a various party, talks, acquaintanc...

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The Lesson of the Master

By: Henry James

He had been told the ladies were at church, but this was corrected by what he saw from the top of the steps - they descended from a great height in two arms, with a circular sweep of the most charming effect - at the threshold of the door which, from the long bright gallery, overlooked the immense lawn. Three gentlemen, on the grass, at a distance, sat under the great trees, while the fourth figure showed a crimson dress that told as a bit of colour amid the fresh rich g...

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