World Library  

Top 100 books on Philosophy


 
  • Cover Image

The Art of War

By: Sun Tzu

Description: A succinct, engaging, and practical guide for succeeding in any creative sphere, The War of Art is nothing less than Sun-Tzu for the soul. hat keeps so many of us from doing what we long to do? Why is there a naysayer within? How can we avoid the roadblocks of any creative endeavor—be it starting up a dream business venture, writing a novel, or painting a masterpiece? Bestselling novelist Steven Pressfield identif ies the enemy that every one of us must face...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Dhammapada, the Sutta-nipâta, Score Bud Sbe10

By: F. Müller

Description: This is a subset of F. Max Mullers great collection The Sacred Books of the East which includes translations of all the most important works of the seven non-Christian religions which have exercised a profound influence on the civilizations o

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Republic, Score Plato Rep

By: Plato

Description: The Republic, written in 380BC by the great philosopher and thinker Plato, is the longest and greatest of his works. Originally titled as politeria, meaning 'City-State governance' in Greek, it actually proposes a Just society ruled by a phil

Read More
  • Cover Image

Phaedrus, Score Plato Phaedrus

By: Plato

Description: Phaedrus By Plato The Phaedrus written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues. The Phaedrus was presumably composed around 370 BC, around the same time as Plato's

Read More
  • Cover Image

Alcibiades I

By: Plato

It seems impossible to separate by any exact line the genuine writings of Plato from the spurious. The only external evidence to them which is of much value is that of Aristotle; for the Alexandrian catalogues of a century later include manifest forgeries. Even the value of the Aristotelian authority is a good deal impaired by the uncertainty concerning the date and authorship of the writings which are ascribed to him. And several of the citations of Aristotle omit the n...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Symposium

By: Plato

Description: Concerning the things about which you ask to be informed I believe that I am not ill-prepared with an answer. For the day before yesterday I was coming from my own home at Phalerum to the city, and one of my acquaintance, who had caught a sight of me from behind, calling out playfully in the distance, said: Apollodorus, O thou Phalerian (Probably a play of words on (Greek), 'bald-headed.') man, halt! So I did as I was bid; and then he said, I was looking for...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Physics

By: Aristotle

WHEN the objects of an inquiry, in any department, have principles, conditions, or elements, it is through acquaintance with these that knowledge, that is to say scientific knowledge, is attained. For we do not think that we know a thing until we are acquainted with its primary conditions or first principles, and have carried our analysis as far as its simplest elements. Plainly therefore in the science of Nature, as in other branches of study, our first task will be to ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Metaphysics

By: Aristotle

Excerpt: Book I ALL men by nature desire to know. An indication of this is the delight we take in our senses; for even apart from their usefulness they are loved for themselves; and above all others the sense of sight. For not only with a view to action, but even when we are not going to do anything, we prefer seeing (one might say) to everything else. The reason is that this, most of all the senses, makes us know and brings to light many differences between things. By n...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The ethics of Aristotle

By: Aristotle

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: Canadian Libraries Collection; Canadian University Library Collection; Candian History

Read More
  • Cover Image

Principal Doctrines

By: Epicurus

1. A happy and eternal being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; hence he is exempt from movements of anger and partiality, for every such movement implies weakness -- 2. Death is nothing to us; for the body, when it has been resolved into its elements, has no feeling, and that which has no feeling is nothing to us. -- 3. The magnitude of pleasure reaches its limit in the removal of all pain. When pleasure is present, so long as it is unint...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, With the Manual of E...

By: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, Flavius Arrianus
Read More
  • Cover Image

Select Orations

By: Marcus Tullius Cicero

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: American Libraries Collection; Historical Literature

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Summa Theologica Volume I

By: Thomas Aquinas

Universal Digital Library

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Consolation of Philosophy

By: Boethius

Religion and Christian Theology Collection

Excerpt: To pleasant songs my work was erstwhile given, and bright were all my labours then; but now in tears to sad refrains am I compelled to turn. Thus my maimed Muses guide my pen, and gloomy songs make no feigned tears bedew my face. Then could no fear so overcome to leave me companionless upon my way. They were the pride of my earlier bright-lived days: in my later gloomy days they are the comfort of my fate; for hastened by unhappiness has age come upon me without...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Confucian Analects Confucius, Score Cfu Conf1

By: James Legge

Description: This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it ava

Read More
  • Cover Image

Sacred Writings;

By: Confucius
Read More
  • Cover Image

The Sayings of Confucius: A New Translation of the Greater Part of the

By: Confucius; Translated by Lionel Giles

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: American Libraries Collection; Historical Literature

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Writings of Mencius

By: James Legge

4. 'If your Majesty say, What is to be done to profit my kingdom? the great officers will say, What is to be done to profit our families? and the inferior officers and the common people will say, What is to be done to profit our persons? Superiors and inferiors will try to snatch this profit the one from the other, and the kingdom will be endangered. In the kingdom of ten thousand chariots, the murderer of his sovereign shall be the chief of a family of a thousand chario...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Sidelights on Relativity

By: Albert Einstein

Excerpt: How does it come about that alongside of the idea of ponderable matter, which is derived by abstraction from everyday life, the physicists set the idea of the existence of another kind of matter, the ether? The explanation is probably to be sought in those phenomena which have given rise to the theory of action at a distance, and in the properties of light which have led to the undulatory theory. Let us devote a little while to the consideration of these two subjects.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Essays of Michel de Montaigne

By: William Carew Hazilitt

Excerpt: Essays of Michel De Montaigne, Book the First, translated by Charles Cotton, Ed. William Carew Hazilitt.

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 1 - 20 of 139 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.