World Library  


 
  • Cover Image

Hidden Identities

Pseudonyms
It was a truism that a respectable woman’s name was published only three times during her life: upon the occasions of her birth, marriage, and death. Especially for the upper classes, seeing one’s name in print meant scandal and the ruin of a good reputation. Coupled with the prevailing attitude of feminine inferiority and institutional discrimination against women, no scientific or academic organization would consider, much less publish, a scholarly treatise authored by a woman.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Navigating Society

Manners
Love or money may make the world go ’round, but manners grease the gears. Every culture around the globe creates an elaborate system of etiquette that determines an orderly formula of behavior. This knowledge of social interaction inspires confidence and shows at least a basic level of care and respect for others. With his usual pithy wit, Oscar Wilde is credited with saying, “A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone’s feelings unintentionally.” He meant, of course, that a gentleman (or lady) who insulted another person did so with intention.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Aiming High

Many cities worldwide are renowned for their iconic skyscrapers, once defined as tall, multi-story, commercial buildings built mainly in New York City and Chicago between 1884 and 1939.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Awaiting Autumn

After a long, steamy summer, many welcome the cool, crisp, refreshing days of autumn. They are eager to swap their casual shorts and tees for cozy sweaters, knit scarves, and chic boots.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Celebrate the International Day of Peace

Throughout history, alliances among nations have called for peace. For most, that meant conquering other countries and bringing them under a single ruler. Such efforts often testifies less to notions of peace and tolerance and more to the greed, corruption, and megalomania of certain rulers. The great empires of history come to mind, some more tolerant than others and most ruled by a culture or people who deemed themselves superior over those whom they ruled.  

Read More
  • Cover Image

Comic Innovators

The comic form is both a stepping stone from and towards the cinematic form, the glue between genres, a blending and a reimagining. But the genre term comic is antiquated and, broadly speaking, inaccurate. It implies the comedic, silly, and whimsical. And while there are certainly these types of comic strips around today, one divergent form has evolved into the graphic novel, which in many ways could become the new modern novel.

Read More
  • Cover Image

How a Man Became a Mountain

Confucius
As the legend goes, the rare qilin visited Confucius' mother Yen Ching-tsai before his birth. The qilin, that sacred chimera and prince of four-footed creatures, which walks on clouds so as to not damage even a single blade of grass, is said to only appear at the birth or death of a great sage or during the reign of a good king. The strange beast brought to Ching-tsai a tablet of jade on which was engraved words to the effect, "The son of the essence of water shall soon succeed to the withering Chou, and be a throneless king."

Read More
  • Cover Image

Cry of Dolores

Mexican War for Independence
A great flare broke out in New Spain on September 16th, 1810, in a small town called Dolores. What began as covert meetings led by Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and former military leader Ignacio Allende quickly became an open revolt against the Spain's foreign governance.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Me, Myself, and I

Narcissism, the pursuit of gratification from vanity or egotistic admiration of one’s own attributes, hails from Greek mythology. The story highlights the young, handsome Narcissus, who fell in love with his own image, which was reflected in a pool of water after he rejected the advances of the nymph Echo. Today, the word narcissism is widely used to describe excessive or erotic interest in oneself and one’s physical appearance.

Read More
  • Cover Image

For the Glory of the Write

Miguel de Cervantes
Don't compare yourself to a man like Miguel de Cervantes. He was a unique human of quality, the type that skews the graph of mankind's ability. The type that rarely comes around, born into a time and circumstances perfectly crafted for this singular force to flourish.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Peace on Earth

Every year (with some exceptions), the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses.”

Read More
  • Cover Image

Self Improvement

Tuning In
A quick stroll down the aisles of any bookstore will reveal entire sections dedicated to self-help. Defined as “the use of one’s own efforts and resources to achieve things without relying on others,” the self-help industry rakes in $11 billion per year in America. Beyond being recession-proof, this unregulated industry is also forecast for more growth—5.5% annually, according to marketing expert Brandon Gaille.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Flytings and the War of Words

Conflict breeds creativity, some say. It is the art of dispute, a sparring of words, a logical brawl. The old practiced medieval bards of the flytings knew this adage well, and tested themselves and others constantly.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Undercover

History of Undergarments
From panties to bustiers to seductive corsets, flirty lingerie, boxers and briefs, undergarments come in a variety of styles, each embraced by the distinctive persons and personalities who wear them. While some yearn for the comfort of a cozy pair of cotton briefs, the silky touch of satin entices others.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Top Dogs

Dogs deserve their appellation of “man’s best friend.” Just ask the American Kennel Club.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Practically Perfect Woman

Mary
Of the three great world religions, the Roman Catholic Church occupies the position of 800 lb. gorilla in Christianity. This is the religion founded by followers of Jesus Christ and which ruled much of the Western Hemisphere until the Reformation. Regardless of whether one is Catholic or even Christian, one cannot deny the importance of the woman who started it all: Mary.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The First Shhh!

Birth of the Library
“Books contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are…I know they are as lively and as vigorously productive as those fabulous dragon’s teeth, and being sewn up and down may chance to spring up armed men.”

Read More
  • Cover Image

Riding the Wind

Summer represents a sense of freedom for many people around the globe. In some countries, summertime marks the ultimate freedom—a reprieve from school commitments. It’s also the time of year that many take vacations. While some set sail for cruising the seas, others indulge in leisurely afternoons lounging on sailboats while listening to the mesmerizing lull of the sea.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Remembering the Bombs

Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Is a short and brutal implementation of total warfare preferable to a long, drawn out limited warfare which culminates in more casualties and greater economic strain? The bombings of Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the culmination of the Pacific Theater of World War II, which began in 1941 with the bombing of Pearl Harbor. But what if the Americans, or any country for that matter, had atomic bombs at the beginning of WWII? Would they have been justified in using them right off the bat if they knew it would prevent the high price of years of world war to come?

Read More
  • Cover Image

Prayers for Pele

Volcanoes
In our age of nuclear armaments, one would think a holiday might be set aside for the act of eruptions. Holidays do not, of course, always celebrate joyous occasions. They also inspire solemnity, meditation, and reflection. As we remember this month the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, so we should also remember the even greater forces that have loomed over us from beneath: volcanoes.

Read More
 
11
|
12
|
13
|
14
|
15
Records: 241 - 260 of 361 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.