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Earth Day

Nature of Yesteryear
April 22 is Earth Day, a worldwide event that celebrates our stewardship of Earth. It was devised in 1970 by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, and spurred on by a recent oil spill in Santa Barbara and the gathering public consciousness of anti-war protests. It became more popular and meaningful every year since. 
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Passion of the Sonnet

Savage Traditions and their Detectives
A look at the sonnet through The Savage Detectives.
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Threadbare

Lace in Literature
The socioeconomic symbolism of lace throughout much of fashion history cannot be underestimated. Readers of historical romance understands the significance of any mention of a four-inch lace hem, lace-trimmed ruffles, or a froth of lace at throat and cuffs.

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The Literature of Vermin

World Rat Day
April 4 is World Rat Day. The very thought of celebrating vermin detested the world over makes one shiver with loathing. 
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March Author Spotlight

BS Murthy
BS Murthy was born in 1948, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, India. He has worked as a Hyderabad-based insurance surveyor and loss assessor since 1986. He is married with two sons, the elder one holding a Ph.D. in finance and the younger a master’s degree in Engineering.
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Racial Inequality

African American Stories

Racial inequality in the United States underlies a wide range of societal issues that affect the life chances of different groups disproportionately by race. There are vast differences in wealth across racial groups in the United States. There are many causes, including years of home ownership, household income, unemployment, and education, but inheritance might be the most important.

http://worldheritage.org/articles/Racial_inequality_in_the_United_States

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Leading the Way

Novelist Edith Wharton


Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Wharton combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era's other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt.

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Literature of Foodies

Whetting the Appetite
Foodies are a distinct hobbyist group. Typical foodie interests and activities include the food industry, wineries and wine tasting, breweries and beer sampling, food science, following restaurant openings and closings and occasionally reopenings, food distribution, food fads, health and nutrition, cooking classes, culinary tourism, and restaurant management

Works on Gastronomy

There have been many writings on gastronomy throughout the world that capture the thoughts and aesthetics of a culture's cuisine during a period in their history. In some cases, these works continue to define or influence the contemporary gastronomic thought and cuisine of their respective cultures.

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Freedom to Read

Banned Books
Banned books are books or other printed works such as essays or plays which are prohibited by law or to which free access is not permitted by other means. The practice of banning books is a form of censorship, from political, legal, religious, moral, or (less often) commercial motives. This article lists notable banned books and works, giving a brief context for the reason that each book was prohibited. Banned books include fictional works such as novels, poems and plays and non-fiction works such as biographies and dictionaries.

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Children's Literature

Based in the Classics

Children's literature or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader.

Children's literature can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 1400s, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children. The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries became known as the "Golden Age of Children's Literature" as this period included the publication of many books acknowledged today as classics.    


http://worldheritage.org/articles/Children's_literature 

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International Women's Day

Celebrating Rebellious Women
International Women's Day (IWD), is celebrated on March 8 every year.

In different regions the focus of the celebrations ranges from general celebration of respect, appreciation, and love towards women to a celebration for women's economic, political, and social achievements. Started as a Socialist political event, the holiday blended the culture of many countries, primarily in Europe, especially those in the Soviet Bloc. In some regions, the day lost its political flavor, and became simply an occasion for people to express their love for women in a way somewhat similar to a mixture of Mother's Day and Valentine's Day. In other regions, however, the political and human rights theme designated by the United Nations runs strong, and political and social awareness of the struggles of women worldwide are brought out and examined in a hopeful manner. Some people celebrate the day by wearing purple ribbons.

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Black History Month

A Look Back

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada in February and the United Kingdom.

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Tomato vs. Book vs. Fiction vs. Farce

A Gander Into Farce

A peanut gallery was, in the days of vaudeville, a nickname for the cheapest (and ostensibly rowdiest) seats in the theater, the occupants of which were often known to heckle.

The least expensive snack served at the theatre would often be peanuts, which the patrons would sometimes throw at the performers on stage to convey their disapproval. The phrases "no comments from the peanut gallery" or "quiet in the peanut gallery" are extensions of the name.

In 1943 the Howdy Doody children's radio show adopted the name to represent its audience of children. Howdy Doody is most remembered for its later transition to television, which continued the Peanut Gallery audience, now on camera.


http://worldheritage.org/articles/Peanut_gallery

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Charge Your Style with Life

March Poetry Corner Exhibit
In the countable sense, a verse is formally a single metrical line in a poetic composition. However, verse has come to represent any division or grouping of words in a poetic composition, with groupings traditionally having been referred to as stanzas.

In the uncountable (mass noun) sense verse refers to "poetry" as contrasted to prose. Where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme, the common unit of prose is purely grammatical, such as a sentence or paragraph. Verse has had a traditional application in drama, which is therefore known as dramatic poetry, verse drama, or dramatic verse.     


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Das Kapital by Karl Marx

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Das Kapital"

Das Kapital or “Capital: Critique of Political Economy” was written by Karl Marx in 1867 and it is the masterwork of communist ideology, political theory, and economic critique.
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The Social Contract by Jean Jacques Rousseau

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
The Social Contract

He was unstable, with bouts of hypochondria and extreme paranoia; he was scandalous and super influential in the revolutionary spirit of his day. Jean Jacques Rousseau was Hollywood before there was Hollywood.
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Two Treatises of Government by John Locke

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Two Treatises of Government"

What makes government good? John Locke's answer was that good government came from the people, was for the people, and was by the people. Locke was so influential on a minority revolution in North America in a country that would come to be called The United States.
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Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Robinson Crusoe"

If you were on an island and you got to be king of that world, how would you govern it? Is there a noble form of colonization? This novel forces readers to struggle with this question.
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The White Company by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Behind the Book Lecture Series

Sherlock Holmes was an extremely profitable character for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. His character is still prevalent today in literature and pop culture.
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The Art of War by Sun Tzu

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"The Art of War"  

Sun Tzu said great warriors are already victorious before they go to war. The supreme art of war is to vanquish your enemy without fighting.
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