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Boss (architecture)

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Title: Boss (architecture)  
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Subject: Keystone (architecture), Lierne (vault), Bradford Industrial Museum, Norwich Cathedral, Jewel Tower
Collection: Arches and Vaults, Ornaments, Ornaments (Architecture)
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Boss (architecture)

In architecture, a boss is a knob or protrusion of stone or wood. Bosses can often be found in the ceilings of buildings, particularly at the intersection of a vault.[1] In Gothic architecture, such roof bosses (or ceiling bosses) are often intricately carved with foliage, heraldic devices or other decorations. Many feature animals, birds, or human figures or faces, sometimes realistic, but often grotesque: the Green Man is a frequent subject.

Bosses were also an important feature of ancient and Classical construction. When stone components were rough-cut offsite at quarries, they were usually left with bosses (small knobs) protruding on at least one side. This allowed for easy transport of the pieces to the site; once there, the bosses also facilitated raising and/or inserting them into place. An excellent extant example of such bosses can be seen at the Greek Doric temple of Segesta, at which construction was never completed. The bosses of several key elements of the temple, notably the crepidoma, remain as a testament to the construction process.

Contents

  • Gallery 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ Ching, Francis D. K. (1995). A Visual Dictionary of Architecture. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 263.  

External links

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