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Earl of March

Earldom of the March (Scottish)

Arms of the Earl of March
Creation date 11th century
Monarch Malcolm III of Scotland
Peerage Peerage of Scotland
First holder Patrick de Dunbar, 8th Earl of March
Present holder Charles Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke of Richmond
Remainder to the 1st Earl's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten.
Subsidiary titles The Arms of the Realm and Ancient Local Principalities of Scotland [1]

The title The Earl of March has been created several times in the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of England. The title derived from the "marches" or boundaries between England and either Wales (Welsh Marches) or Scotland (Scottish Marches), and was held by several great feudal families which owned lands in those border districts. Later, however, the title came to be granted as an honorary dignity, and ceased to carry any associated power in the marches.

Contents

  • Earls of March in the Peerage of Scotland 1
    • Scottish Earls of March, first Creation 1.1
    • Scottish Earls of March, second Creation (1455) 1.2
    • Scottish Earls of March, third Creation (1581) 1.3
    • Scottish Earls of March, fourth Creation (1697) 1.4
  • Earls of March in the Peerage of England 2
    • English Earls of March, first Creation (1328) 2.1
    • English Earls of March, second Creation (1479) 2.2
    • English Earls of March, third Creation (1619) 2.3
    • English Earls of March, fourth Creation (1675) 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5

Earls of March in the Peerage of Scotland

The Earls of March on the Scottish border were descended from George de Dunbar, 11th Earl of March & Dunbar, whose honours and lands were forfeited to the Crown. He retired into England and died in obscurity.

Following his forfeiture, the next creation of the Earldom of March was for Alexander Stuart, Duke of Albany. At the death of his successor John, the dukedom and earldom became extinct. The next creation was for Robert Stuart, but at his death the earldom again became extinct.

The most recent Scottish creation of the Earldom of March was in 1697 for the Lord William Douglas, a younger son of the first Duke of Queensberry. For more information on this creation, see the Earl of Wemyss and March.

Scottish Earls of March, first Creation

See Earl of Dunbar, for which "Earl of the March" is used as an alternate title.

Scottish Earls of March, second Creation (1455)

Scottish Earls of March, third Creation (1581)

with subsidiary Lord (of) Dunbar (1581)

Scottish Earls of March, fourth Creation (1697)

see the Earl of Wemyss and March

Earls of March in the Peerage of England

The Earls of March on the Welsh Marches were descended from Roger Mortimer, as there had been no single office in this region since the Earl of Mercia. He forfeited his title, which was in the Peerage of England, for treason in 1330, but his descendant Roger managed to have it restored eighteen years later. With the death of the fifth Earl, however, there remained no more Mortimers who were heirs to the first Earl, and the title passed to Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York. At Richard's death, the titles passed to his son Edward, who would later become King Edward IV, causing the earldom of March to merge into the Crown.

In the Peerage of England, the next creation of the earldom came when Edward Plantagenet, Duke of Cornwall was made Earl of March in 1479. In 1483, he succeeded as King Edward V, and the earldom merged in the crown. Later that year, however, his uncle Richard of Gloucester acceded to the throne as Richard III. The fate of the young Edward and his brother, Richard has never been confirmed.

The next English creation was in favour of Esme Stewart, the third Duke of Lennox. His successors bore the earldom, until the death of the sixth Duke, when both the earldom and the dukedom became extinct. The last English creation was in favour of Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and Lennox. His successors have borne the English earldom of March since then.

English Earls of March, first Creation (1328)

English Earls of March, second Creation (1479)

English Earls of March, third Creation (1619)

English Earls of March, fourth Creation (1675)

See Duke of Richmond and Lennox

See also

References

  1. ^ Pottinger, Don; Moncreiffe of that Ilk, Iain (1983), Scotland of old, Edinburgh: Bartholemew,  ,

Further reading

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