Leonard gaskin

Leonard Gaskin
Birth name Leonard Gaskin
Born (1920-08-25)August 25, 1920
Origin United States New York City, U.S.
Died January 24, 2009(2009-01-24) (aged 88)
Genres Jazz
Instruments Bass
Leonard Gaskin (August 25, 1920 – January 24, 2009) was an American jazz bassist born in New York City.

Gaskin played on the early bebop scene at Minton's and Monroe's in New York in the early 1940s. In 1944 he took over Oscar Pettiford's spot in Dizzy Gillespie's band,[1] and followed it with stints in bands led by Cootie Williams, Charlie Parker, Don Byas, Eddie South, Charlie Shavers, and Erroll Garner. In the 1950s he played with Eddie Condon's Dixieland band, and played with Ruby Braff, Bud Freeman, Rex Stewart, Cootie Williams, Billie Holiday, Stan Getz, J.J. Johnson, and Miles Davis.

In the 1960s he became a studio musician, playing on numerous gospel and pop records. In the 1970s and 1980s he returned to jazz, playing with Sy Oliver, Panama Francis, and The International Art of Jazz.

Leonard Gaskin became involved in educating young people later in his life. He performed and shared his knowledge with elementary students with the Good Groove Band (Leonard Gaskin, Melissa Lovaglio, Bob Emry, Michael Howell) at Woodstock Elementary School in Woodstock, NY in 2003. Gaskin died January 24, 2009

Discography

As leader

  • 1961 – Leonard Gaskin at the Jazz Band Ball, (Swingville)
  • 1961 – Darktown Strutter's Ball, (Swingville)

As sideman

References

  • Leonard Gaskin at Allmusic
  • April,2009-AFM)

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