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Mazda MZR engine

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Mazda MZR engine

Turbocharged MZR engine in a 2006 Mazdaspeed6

MZR is the brand name of a generation of Straight-4 engines engineered and built by the Mazda Motor Corporation from 2001 to the present. MZR stands for MaZda Responsive". The MZR generation includes gasoline and diesel powered engines ranging in displacements from 1.3L to 2.5L.

All gasoline-powered MZRs feature an all-aluminum block construction with iron cylinder liners. The diesel MZR-CD engines use a cast-iron block (virtually identical to the Mazda F engine) and an aluminum cylinder head.

There are three specific engine families within the MZR which include:

  1. the small 1.3L to 1.6L Mazda Z-engine,
  2. the mid-sized 1.8L to 2.5L Mazda L-engine, and
  3. the 2.0L and 2.2L common-rail diesel Mazda R-engine.

The DISI turbocharged MZR L3-VDT was on the Ward's 10 Best Engines list for 3 consecutive years for 2006, 2007 and 2008.

The Ford Motor Company owns rights to build and use the MZR generation of engines under their Duratec brand name for global service in its vehicles since 2003.

As of 2011, Mazda discontinued development of the MZR generation of engines to be replaced by their new SkyActiv generation of engines. Some early 2012 Mazda cars are equipped with the 2.0 MZR engines as a option as well. Ford continues to develop and manufacture variants of the Z-engine and L-engine for their Duratec and EcoBoost four-cylinder engines. The third generation MX-5 was still produced with the MZR 1.8 or 2.0 engine, which may be shipped from the factory with a Ford Motor Company oil filter fitted, suggesting a shared production line.

See also

References

  • MAZDA engine codes
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