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Mazdaspeed3

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Mazdaspeed3

Mazdaspeed3
Overview
Manufacturer Mazda
Also called Mazda3 MPS
Mazdaspeed Axela
Production 2007–2013
Assembly Hofu, Japan
Body and chassis
Class Sport compact
Body style 5-door hatchback
Layout FF layout
Related Mazda3
Powertrain
Engine 2.3L I4
Transmission 6-speed manual

The Mazdaspeed3 is a sport compact hatchback introduced for the 2007 model year by Mazdaspeed, Mazda's in-house performance division. Now in its second generation, the Mazdaspeed3 is a performance-enhanced version of the 5-door Mazda3.

Mazda unveiled the Mazda3 MPS (Mazda Performance Series) at the 2006 Geneva Motor Show in February. The same model is sold in North America as the Mazdaspeed3 and as the Mazdaspeed Axela in Japan. The vehicle is front-wheel drive and powered by a 2.3-litre gasoline engine. The Mazdaspeed3 was designed prior to the latest generation of hot hatches, including the Dodge Caliber SRT-4, Ford Focus ST, and the Volkswagen Golf/Rabbit GTI.. The engine featured in the Mazdaspeed3 produces 263 horsepower. The Mazdaspeed3 also features a limited slip differential. The car produces 280 lb-ft of torque.

The Mazdaspeed3 is the company's first hot hatchback since the BG Familia GT-X of the early 1990s. Only two white Mazdaspeed3's have been produced since the vehicle's inception.

2010-2013

Second generation
Overview
Production 2010–2013
Dimensions
Wheelbase
Length 4,510 mm (177.6 in)
Width 1,770 mm (69.7 in)
Height 1,460 mm (57.5 in)

The 2010 Mazdaspeed3 started at US$ 23,945[1] and retains the MZR 2.3 DISI Turbo engine.[2] New ECU tweaks will provide for a more useful power curve; additionally the gear ratios have been revised. A functional hood scoop was added to allow for a denser charge to the top-mounted intercooler while also keeping heatsoak to a minimum, a common complaint with the 1st generation Mazdaspeed3. The newer generation MZR engine contains updated pistons with a "dish" around the spark plug area. This is probably to keep the fuel mix concentrated around the spark plug for better combustion. The updated car comes with some additional weight which should be offset by the ECU and gear updates.[3] From a standstill a 2010 Mazdaspeed3 can reach 60 mph in 5.2 seconds, and the quarter-mile in 13.9 seconds at 102 mph.[4] The suspension and steering have been changed to improve performance, most notably with the addition of electric-assisted steering.[5] On the 2013 models, the wheels have been powdercoated a black hue, and the mirrors and rear valance are black.

2013 was the final year of production for this generation of Mazdaspeed3 vehicles.

Awards and recognition

The Mazdaspeed3 has received numerous awards since its inception, winning Car and Driver's 10 Best list for 2007, 2008, and 2010;[6] the car was an Automobile Magazine's 2007 All Star as well and has also received several more mentions and awards.[7]

References

External links

  • Mazdaspeed3 official sites for Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, United States
  • Mazdaspeed Forums-Number One Mazda Enthusiast Tech Site
  • mazda-mps.org Mazda3 MPS Owners Network
  • The UK MPS Owners Club
  • MOCSA - Mazda Owners Club of South Africa
  • Mazda MPS Community The German-speaking Mazdaspeed Community
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