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PT Kereta Api Indonesia

 

PT Kereta Api Indonesia

This article is about the railway operator. For an overview of the railway network, see Rail transport in Indonesia.
PT Kereta Api Indonesia (Persero)
250px
Locale Java and Sumatra
Dates of operation 1945–present
Track gauge (Standard gauge)
(Cape gauge)

Length 5,042 kilometres (3,133 mi)
Headquarters Bandung

The Indonesian Railway (Indonesian: PT Kereta Api Indonesia (Persero)) is the major operator of public railways in Indonesia. It is completely owned by the government and pays track access charges to the government. One of its subsidiaries, PT Kereta Api Indonesia (Persero) Commuter Jabodetabek (KCJ), is operating electrified commuter service in Jakarta metropolitan area from August 14, 2008.

History

PT Kereta Api Indonesia (Persero) is the modern incarnation of a long line of successive state railway companies dating from Dutch colonial days.

Pre-independence era

The first railway line in Indonesia began operations on August 10, 1867 in Central Java. By May 21, 1873, the line had connected three main cities in the region, i.e. [Semarang], Solo and Yogyakarta. This line was operated by a private company, Nederlandsch-Indische Spoorweg Maatschappij (NIS: Netherlands East Indies Railway Company).

The liberal Dutch government of the era was then reluctant to build its own railway, preferring to give a free rein to private enterprises. However, private railways could not provide the expected return of investment (even NIS required some financial assistance from the government), and the Dutch Ministry of Colonies finally approved a state railway system, the Staatsspoorwegen (State Railway), extending from Buitenzorg (now Bogor) in the west, to Surabaya in the east. Construction began from both ends, the first line (from Surabaya) being opened on May 16, 1878, and both cities were connected by 1894.

Private enterprises did not completely get out of the picture, and at least 15 light railway companies operated in Java. These companies operated as "steam tram companies", but despite the name, were better described as regional secondary lines.

As befits a colonial enterprise, most railway lines in Indonesia had a dual purpose: economic and strategic. In fact, a condition for the financial assistance for the NIS was that the company build a railway line to Ambarawa, which had an important fort named Willem I for the Dutch king. The first state railway line was built through the mountains on the southern part of Java, instead of the flat regions on the north, for a similar strategic reason. The state railway in Java connected Anyer on the western coast of the island, to Banyuwangi on the eastern coast.

In Sumatra, railways were first used for military purposes, with a railway line connecting Banda Aceh and its port of Uleelhee in 1876. The line, first built to a 1067 mm gauge was later regauged to 750 mm and extended south. This line was only transferred to the Ministry of Colonies from the Ministry of War on January 1, 1916, following the relative pacification of Aceh.

Other state railway lines in Sumatra were located in the Minangkabau area (built between 1891–1894) and the Lampung-South Sumatra region (1914–1932). Both lines were mainly used for conveyance of coal from inland mines to ports.

Another important private railway line was the Deli Spoorweg Maatschappij (Deli Railway Company). This line served regions producing rubber and tobacco in Deli.

Between July 1922 and 1930, a 47 kilometres (29 mi)-long railway line operated in South Sulawesi. This line was to be extended to North Sulawesi, as part of a massive project of railway construction in Borneo and Sulawesi, connection of separate railway systems in Sumatra and electrification of the main lines in Java. The Great Depression of 1929 put paid to these plans.

During the Japanese occupation between 1942 and 1945, the different railway lines in Java were managed as one entity. The Sumatra systems, being under the administration of a different branch of the Japanese armed forces, remained separate.

The occupiers also converted the standard gauge (1,435 mm) lines in Java into 1,067 mm, thereby resolving the dual gauge issue. This was not an actual "problem" as there was not much transfer of materials between the systems, and much of the 1435 mm system had been fitted with a third rail by 1940, creating a mixed-gauge railway.

Independence era

During the war for independence between 1945 and 1949, freedom fighters took over the railways, creating the first direct predecessor to today's PT Kereta Api, the Djawatan Kereta Api Repoeblik Indonesia (Railway Bureau of the Republic of Indonesia), on September 28, 1945. This date, not the 1867 one, is regarded as the birth date of Indonesian railways and commemorated as Railway Day every year, due to political ground.

In Sumatra, the separate systems were similarly taken over, named Kereta Api Soematera Oetara Negara Repoeblik Indonesia in North Sumatra and Kereta Api Negara Repoeblik Indonesia in South and West Sumatra.

On the other hand, the Dutch created its own combined railway system to manage the lines located on its occupied territory, the Verenigd Spoorwegbedrijf (Combined Railways). By the time of Dutch recognition of Indonesian independence, the VS had most railway lines under its management, though not all were in operation.

With Indonesia's full independence in 1949, the separate systems (except the Deli Railway) were combined into the Djawatan Kereta Api. Non-state railway systems in Java retained their paper existence until 1958, when all railway lines in Indonesia were nationalized, including the Deli Railway, thereby creating the Perusahaan Negara Kereta Api (PNKA: State Railway Corporation).

On September 15, 1971, PNKA was reorganized into Perusahaan Jawatan Kereta Api (Railway Bureau Corporation), in turn reorganized into Perumka (Perusahaan Umum Kereta Api: Public Railway Corporation) on January 2, 1991. Perumka was transformed into PT Kereta Api (Persero) on June 1, 1999.

The headquarters of the state railway system, since Dutch colonial days, had been located in Bandung, West Java. Private railway companies were headquartered elsewhere, in Semarang, Tegal, Surabaya and Medan.

Trackage

The total number of trackage laid in Indonesia was 7,583 kilometres (4,712 mi), although not all lines were in operation at the same time. In 1939, the total operational trackage was 4,588 kilometres (2,851 mi) (It is unclear whether dual gauge tracks were counted once or twice). The present extent of the railways is now 5,042 kilometres (3,133 mi), with the Aceh system, most of the West Sumatra system and most former steam tram lines disused, but including new tracks built alongside old tracks (double tracking projects).

Much of the branch lines constructed in the colonial era has been lifted up or abandoned in the 1980s. No major railway construction has since taken place, however, many of the busiest lines have been double tracked. The northern coast line of Java would be double tracked completely in 2013, following by the proposed completion of a 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) double tracking project on the southern line by 2015.[1]

Recently double-tracked lines include:

Double tracking is in progress between:

  • Kiaracondong-Cicalengka, 22 kilometers[2]
  • Cirebon-Brebes, 62 kilometers will be finished at end of 2013
  • Brebes-Pekalongan, 72 kilometers will be finished at end of 2011
  • Pekalongan-Semarang, 90 kilometers will be finshed at end of 2013
  • Semarang-Bojonegoro-Surabaya, 280 kilometers will be finished at end of 2013
  • Wonokromo-Sidoarjo
  • Purwokerto-Prupuk (for beginning, the double track until Patuguran, then continue until Prupuk)
  • Kutoarjo-Kroya
  • In 2012, a 270 kilometers double-track railway line will be built to accommodate coal transportation span from Lubuklinggau, Tebing Tinggi, Muara Enim, Prabumulih to Tanjung Api-Api Port.[3]

Significant projects being considered include:

  • Manggarai-Cikarang second double (double double) track line
  • Airport line to the Sukarno-Hatta International Airport. A 33 kilometers line from Manggarai, Dukuh Atas in Sudirman, Tanah Abang, Angke, Pluit and inline with airport toll road to the Airport. The cost will be $1.13 billion start at 2012 and complete at 2014.[4]
  • Rebuilding of the Aceh railway, with assistance from the French railway company
  • By 2012, PT Kereta Api will build new track between Cibungur and Tanjungrasa station with length 15 kilometers. This short cut will makes trains from Bandung to Semarang v.v. do not need through Cikampek station.[5]

Future expansion plans of the railway will include linking of existing railway lines in Sumatra from Aceh to Lampung via both west and east coasts of the island. Railway lines are also planned to be built on the currently railwayless islands of Kalimantan[6] and Sulawesi.[7] A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed to build railway around Bali with length 565 kilometers.[8]

Reactivate of dormant lines will be done by PT KA Daop II. For beginning, reactivate Bandung-Ciwidey line to ease road traffic congestion, reactivate Rancaekek-Tanjung Sari line to accommodate students activities. 4 others dormant lines are still in consideration.[9]

Locomotives and multiple units


All source mentions 374 operational locomotives. The oldest locomotive in the system dates from 1953.

The numbering scheme of locomotives dated from the Japanese occupation, using a combination of letters and numbers. A letter or a combination of letters is used to denote the wheel arrangement (currently there are C, D, BB and CC types), and a three-digit number is used to denote the class (20x for classes with electric transmission and 30x for classes with hydraulic or mechanical transmission), starting from 0. A two- or three-digit number shows the individual number, starting from 01.

Examples

  • D301 70: the 70th member of the second class of D type diesel-hydraulic locomotive
  • CC203 13: the 13th member of the fourth class of diesel electric locomotives with Co-Co wheel arrangement

The steam locomotive classification was directly derived from Japanese practice. Tank locomotives were numbered from the 10's, while tender locomotives from the 50's. Letter combinations were used for articulated locomotives (in the case of Indonesia these were Mallets).

Electric locomotives in Indonesia had always been a minority, and no new electric locomotives had been acquired in the last 70 years. However, electric multiple units have been imported from Japan and elsewhere since 1976. These are operated by the Jabotabek commuter transport division of the PT Kereta Api Indonesia, which has been spun off in August 2008.

May 2011: After changing the rail between Purwosari station and Wonogiri station and also the bridges with R42 (37 kilometers), so line between Srangkah station, Solo and Wonogiri will be served by heavy electric diesel locomotives.[10]

PT Kereta Api Indonesia(Persero) diesel locomotive classes

  • BB203
  • BB204
  • BB300
  • BB301
  • BB302
  • BB303
  • BB304

Rolling stock

As of 2004,[11] PT Kereta Api Indonesia operates:

PT Kereta Api Indonesia is a major customer of the local railway equipment industry, PT Industri Kereta Api (INKA), by using passenger coaches, freight wagons and electric multiple units made by the Madiun-based company.

PT Kereta Api Indonesia's diesel-electric locomotives are mostly made in United States or Canada, while the diesel-hydraulics are mostly German. Electric multiple units are mostly Japanese-built. Local industry is capable of building multiple units, both diesel and electric.

Shops and facilities

In Java, PT Kereta Api Indonesia has its main diesel shop in Pengok, Yogyakarta (special region) for maintenance of both diesel electric and diesel hydraulic locomotives. The separate systems in Sumatra has their shops in Lahat (South Sumatra), Padang (West Sumatra) and Pulubrayan (North Sumatra).

Other maintenance facilities are present in Manggarai (Jakarta), Tegal and Gubeng (Surabaya). These are used to repair coaches and wagons.

A large stabling point and maintenance facilities for electric rail cars has been constructed in Depok, West Java.

Locomotive depots are located in Medan, Tebingtinggi, Padang, Padang Panjang, Kertapati, Tanjungkarang, Rangkasbitung, Tanahabang (Jakarta), Jatinegara (Jakarta), Bandung, Banjar, Cibatu, Cirebon, Purwokerto, Cilacap, Kutoarjo, Semarang, Yogyakarta, Surakarta, Cepu, Madiun, Sidotopo (Surabaya), and Jember.

Assets

To know which Assets are belong to PT KAI (not government), internal revaluation of assets has been done by Transportation Ministry. They are Rp.35 trillion ($4.1 billion) as Land and Rp.22 trillion ($2.6 billion) as Other Assets (Bridges, signals, etc.). The exact value will get at end of 2011 or 2012 with audit by Finance Ministry.

Legislation

Railway operations in Indonesia is regulated by the Legislation No. 13 of 1992 on Railways. This legislation stated that the government operates railways (arts. 4 and 6), delegates operations to an operating body [then the Perumka, and later PT Kereta Api Indonesia] (art. 6) and provides and maintains railway infrastructure (art. 8). Private companies are allowed to cooperate in operation of railways (art. 6).

The Indonesian government has recently created the Directorate General of Railways, directly answerable to the Minister of Transportation. This is expected to improve the railway's position vis-a-vis other transportation modes.

The parliament of Indonesia has finished an amendment to the current legislation, which is to allow greater role for private companies and regional governments in providing railway services. However, as yet there are no private operators of railway services

The following is a schedule of the trip train in Indonesia

Classes

Business class (class 2) in Java

Train No. Train Name Departure Station Departure time Arrival Station Arrival Time Discharge
71 Gumarang Surabaya Pasar Turi 17.10 Jakarta Pasar Senen 06.17 Bojonegoro, Cepu, Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Tegal, Cirebon, Jatinegara
71 Gumarang Jakarta Pasar Senen 14.45 Surabaya Pasar Turi 06.05 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Tegal, Pekalogan, Semarang Tawang, Cepu, Bojonegoro, Lamongan
75 Lodaya Solo Balapan 08.30 Bandung 17.40 Klaten, Tugu Yogyakarta, Wates, Kutoarjo, Kebumen, Gombong, Kroya, Banjar, Tasikmalaya
76 Lodaya Bandung 08.00 Solo Balapan 17.13 Tasikmalaya, Banjar, Kroya, Gombong, Kebumen, Kutoarjo, Wates, Tugu Yogyakarta, Klaten
77 Lodaya Solo Balapan 20.30 Bandung 05.41 Klaten, Tugu Yogyakarta, Wates, Kutoarjo, Kebumen, Gombong, Kroya, Banjar, Tasikmalaya
78 Lodaya Bandung 20.00 Solo Balapan 05.10 Tasikmalaya, Banjar, Kroya, Gombong, Kebumen, Kutoarjo, Wates, Tugu Yogyakarta, Klaten
79 Mutiara Timur Surabaya Gubeng 09.15 Banyuwangi 15.56 Wonokromo, Sidoarjo, Bangil, Pasuruan, Probolinggo, Jatiroto, Rambipuji, Jember, Kalisat, Kalibaru, Kalisetail, Temuguruh, Rogojampi, Krenceng
80 Mutiara Timur Banyuwangi 09.00 Surabaya Gubeng 15.24 Krenceng, Rogojampi, Temuguruh, Kalisetail, Kalibaru, Kalisat, Jember, Rambipuji, Probolinggo, Pasuruan, Bangil, Sidoarjo, Wonokromo
81 Mutiara Timur Surabaya Gubeng 22.35 Banyuwangi 04.57 Sidoarjo, Bangil, Probolinggo, Rambipuji, Jember, Kalisat, Kalibaru, Kalisetail, Temuguruh, Rogojampi, Krenceng
82 Mutiara Timur Banyuwangi 22.20 Surabaya Gubeng 04.53 Krenceng, Rogojampi, Temuguruh, Kalisetail, Kalibaru, Kalisat, Jember, Rambipuji, Probolinggo, Pasuruan, Bangil, Sidoarjo
83/86 Purwojaya Cilacap 18.30 Jakarta Gambir 06.30 Maos, Kroya, Purwokerto, Bekasi, Jatinegara
84/85 Purwojaya Jakarta Gambir 05.45 Cilacap 13.10 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwokerto, Kroya, Maos
87 Sancaka Surabaya Gubeng 07.00 Yogyakarta 12.20 Jombang, Kertosono, Madiun, Sragen, Solo Balapan, Klaten
88 Sancaka Yogyakarta 16.00 Surabaya Gubeng 22.04 Klaten, Solo Balapan, Madiun, Kertosono, Jombang
89 Sancaka Surabaya Gubeng 15.00 Tugu Yogyakarta 20.23 Kertosono, Madiun, Solo Balapan, Klaten
90 Sancaka Tugu Yogyakarta 07.15 Surabaya Gubeng 12.33 Klaten, Solo Balapan, Sragen, Madiun, Kertosono
91 Cirebon Ekspres Cirebon 06.15 Jakarta Gambir 09.16 Jatibarang, Haurgeulis, Jatinegara
92 Cirebon Ekspres Jakarta Gambir 06.00 Cirebon 08.56 Jatinegara, Jatibarang
93 Cirebon Ekspres Tegal 06.00 Jakarta Gambir 10.38 Brebes, Cirebon, Jatinegara
94 Cirebon Ekspres Jakarta Gambir 09.35 Cirebon 12.35 Jatinegara, Haurgeulis, Jatibarang
95 Cirebon Ekspres Cirebon 10.00 Jakarta Gambir 12.58 Jatibarang, Jatinegara
96 Cirebon Ekspres Jakarta Gambir 11.00 Tegal 15.43 Jatinegara, Jatibarang, Cirebon, Brebes
97 Cirebon Ekspres Cirebon 15.15 Jakarta Gambir 18.12 Jatibarang, Jatinegara
98 Cirebon Ekspres Jakarta Gambir 13.15 Cirebon 16.15 Jatinegara, Jatibarang
99 Cirebon Ekspres Tegal 16.10 Jakarta Gambir 21.10 Brebes, Cirebon, Jatibarang, Jatinegara
100 Cirebon Ekspres Jakarta Gambir 18.30 Tegal 23.04 Jatinegara, Haurgeulis, Jatibarang, Cirebon, Brebes
101 Senja Kediri Kediri 17:00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 06:45 Kertosono, Nganjuk, Caruban, Madiun, Paron, Walikukun, Sragen, Solo Jebres, Semarang Tawang Jerakah, Pekalongan, Tegal, Cirebon, Bekasi, Jatinegara
102 Senja Kediri Jakarta Pasar Senen 15:00 Kediri 04:00 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cirebon, Tegal, Pekalongan, Jerakah, Semarang Tawang, Solo Jebres, Sragen, Walikukun, Paron, Madiun, Caruban, Nganjuk, Kertosono
113 Mutiara Selatan Surabaya Gubeng 16.00 Bandung 06.15 Wonokromo, Mojokerto, Jombang, Kertosono, Nganjuk, Madiun, Solo Balapan, Tugu Yogyakarta, Banjar, Ciamis, Tasikmalaya
114 Mutiara Selatan Bandung 17.00 Surabaya Gubeng 06.41 Tasikmalaya, Ciamis, Banjar, Kroya, Kebumen, Tugu Yogyakarta, Solo Balapan, Madiun, Nganjuk, Kertosono, Jombang, Mojokerto, Wonokromo
113 Senja Utama Solo Solo Balapan 18.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 04.02 Klaten, Tugu Yogyakarta, Gombong, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Jatinegara
114 Senja Utama Solo Jakarta Pasar Senen 20.30 Solo Balapan 06.22 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Prupuk, Purwokerto, Tugu Yogyakarta, Klaten
115 Fajar Utama Yogya Tugu Yogyakarta 08.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 16.45 Wates, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Bekasi, Jatinegara
116 Fajar Utama Yogya Jakarta Pasar Senen 06.20 Tugu Yogyakarta 14.45 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Purwokerto, Kroya, Wates
117 Senja Utama Yogya Tugu Yogyakarta 18.30 Jakarta Pasar Senen 03.45 Wates, Kebumen, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Jatinegara
118 Senja Utama Yogya Jakarta Pasar Senen 19.20 Tugu Yogyakarta 04.27 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Prupuk, Purwokerto, Wates
119 Sawunggalih Utama Kutoarjo 07.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 14.14 Kebumen, Karanganyar, Gombong, Kroya, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Bekasi, Jatinegara
120 Sawunggalih Utama Jakarta Pasar Senen 19.00 Kutoarjo 03.03 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Purwokerto, Kroya, Gombong, Karanganyar, Kebumen
121 Sawunggalih Utama Kutoarjo 19.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 02.37 Kebumen, Karanganyar, Gombong, Kroya, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Jatinegara
122 Sawunggalih Utama Jakarta Pasar Senen 08.15 Kutoarjo 15.47 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cirebon, Purwokerto, Kroya, Gombong, Karanganyar, Kebumen
123 Senja Utama Semarang Semarang Tawang 20.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 03.10 Weleri, Pekalongan, Pemalang, Tegal, Jatinegara
124 Senja Utama Semarang Jakarta Pasar Senen 19.10 Semarang Tawang 02.48 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Tegal, Pemalang, Pekalongan, Weleri
125 Fajar Utama Semarang Semarang Tawang 08.00 Jakarta Pasar Senen 14.55 Weleri, Pekalongan, Pemalang, Tegal, Cirebon, Jatinegara
126 Fajar Utama Semarang Jakarta Pasar Senen 07.15 Semarang Tawang 14.30 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Tegal, Pekalongan, Weleri
19A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 05.30 Jakarta Gambir 08.43 Cimahi, Purwakarta, Jatinegara
20A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 05.45 Bandung 09.08 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
21A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 06.30 Jakarta Gambir 09.55 Cimahi, Padalarang, Purwakarta Bekasi, Jatinegara
22A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 09.15 Bandung 12.38 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cimahi
23A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 11.30 Jakarta Gambir 15.02 Cimahi, Padalarang, Purwakarta, Bekasi, Jatinegara
24A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 11.30 Bandung 14.58 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
25A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 14.35 Jakarta Gambir 17.48 Cimahi,Bekasi, Jatinegara
26A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 16.35 Bandung 19.39 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
27A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 16.30 Jakarta Gambir 19.52 Cimahi, Purwakarta, Bekasi, Jatinegara
28A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 19.00 Bandung 22.26 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cimahi
29A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 20.05 Jakarta Gambir 23.30 Bekasi, Jatinegara
30A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 20.25 Bandung 23.46 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta
7061 Malabar Ekspress Malang 15.30 Bandung 08.37 Blitar, Tulungagung, Kediri, Kertosono, Nganjuk, Madiun, Solo, Klaten, Yogya, Wates, Kebumen, Banjar, Tasik
7062 Malabar Ekspress Bandung 15.30 Malang 08.11 Blitar, Tulungagung, Kediri, Kertosono, Nganjuk, Madiun, Solo, Klaten, Yogya, Wates, Kebumen, Banjar, Tasik
7063 (Monday-Friday) Argo Parahyangan Bandung 08.45 Jakarta Gambir 11.58 Cimahi, Bekasi, Jatinegara
7064 (Monday-Friday) Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 13.30 Bandung 16.47 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cimahi
7065 (only Monday) Argo Parahyangan Bandung 04.00 Jakarta Gambir 07.23 Bekasi, Jatinegara
7066 (only Monday) Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 08.30 Bandung 11.43 Jatinegara, Bekasi
7067 Argo Parahyangan Bandung 13.30 Jakarta Gambir 17.05 Cimahi, Bekasi, Jatinegara
7068 Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 17.40 Bandung 20.55 Jatinegara, Bekasi

Executive class (class 1) in Java

Train No. Train Name Departure Station Departure time Arrival Station Arrival Time Discharge
1 Argo Bromo Anggrek Surabaya Pasar Turi 08.10 Jakarta Gambir 18.37 Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Jatinegara
2 Argo Bromo Anggrek Jakarta Gambir 09.30 Surabaya Pasar Turi 19.58 Cirebon, Pekalongan, Semarang Tawang
3 Argo Bromo Anggrek Surabaya Pasar Turi 20.10 Jakarta Gambir 07.30 Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Cirebon, Jatinegara
4 Argo Bromo Anggrek Jakarta Gambir 21.30 Surabaya Pasar Turi 07.57 Cirebon, Pekalongan, Semarang Tawang
5 Argo Wilis Surabaya Gubeng 07.30 Bandung 19.56 Jombang, Kertosono, Madiun, Solo Balapan,

Tugu Yogyakarta, Kutoarjo, Karanganyar, Banjar, Tasikmalaya

6 Argo Wilis Bandung 07.00 Surabaya Gubeng 19.47 Tasikmalaya, Banjar, Karanganyar, Kutoarjo, Tugu Yogyakarta,

Solo Balapan, Madiun, Kertosono, Jombang

7 Argo Lawu Solo Balapan 08.00 Jakarta Gambir 16.03 Klaten, Tugu Yogyakarta, Karanganyar, Purwokerto, Jatinegara
8 Argo Lawu Jakarta Gambir 20.00 Solo Balapan 04.04 Purwokerto, Karanganyar, Tugu Yogyakarta, Klaten
9 Argo Dwipangga Solo Balapan 20.00 Jakarta Gambir 04.06 Klaten, Tugu Yogyakarta, Karanganyar, Purwokerto, Jatinegara
10 Argo Dwipangga Jakarta Gambir 08.00 Solo Balapan 16.04 Purwokerto, Karanganyar, Tugu Yogyakarta, Klaten
11 Argo Sindoro Semarang Tawang 05.30 Jakarta Gambir 11.23 Pekalongan, Tegal, Jatinegara
12 Argo Sindoro Jakarta Gambir 16.45 Semarang Tawang 22.35 Tegal, Pekalongan
13 Argo Muria Semarang Tawang 16.00 Jakarta Gambir 21.55 Pekalongan, Tegal, Jatinegara
14 Argo Muria Jakarta Gambir 07.15 Semarang Tawang 13.11 Tegal, Pekalongan
27 Argo Jati Cirebon 05.45 Jakarta Gambir 08.32 Jatinegara
28 Argo Jati Jakarta Gambir 09.00 Cirebon 11.42 Jatinegara
29 Argo Jati Cirebon 14.00 Jakarta Gambir 16.48 Jatinegara
30 Argo Jati Jakarta Gambir 17.10 Cirebon 19.58 Jatinegara
31 Gajayana Malang 16.25 Jakarta Kota 07.30 Blitar, Tulungagung, Kediri, Madiun,

Solo Balapan, Tugu Yogyakarta, Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Purwokerto, Jatinegara

32 Gajayana Jakarta Kota 17.15 Malang 08.44 Purwokerto, Sumpiuh, Karanganyar, Tugu Yogyakarta, Solo Balapan,

Madiun, Kertosono, Kediri, Tulungagung, Blitar

33 Bima Surabaya Gubeng 17.00 Jakarta Kota 06.30 Mojokerto, Jombang, Kertosono, Madiun, Solo Balapan, Tugu Yogyakarta, Karanganyar, Sumpiuh,

Purwokerto, Jatinegara

34 Bima Jakarta Kota 17.00 Surabaya Gubeng 05.49 Purwokerto, Sumpiuh, Karanganyar, Tugu Yogyakarta, Solo Balapan,

Madiun, Kertosono, Jombang, Mojokerto

35 Sembrani Surabaya Pasar Turi 18.35 Jakarta Kota 06.49 Lamongan, Bojonegoro, Cepu, Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Jatinegara.
36 Sembrani Jakarta Kota 17.30 Surabaya Pasar Turi 07.02 Jatinegara, Pekalongan, Semarang Tawang, Cepu, Bojonegoro, Lamongan.
37 Turangga Surabaya Gubeng 18.00 Bandung 07.10 Mojokerto, Kertosono, Madiun, Solo Balapan,

Tugu Yogyakarta,Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Kroya, Banjar, Tasikmalaya

38 Turangga Bandung 19.00 Surabaya Gubeng 08.25 Tasikmalaya, Banjar, Kroya, Karanganyar, Tugu Yogyakarta,

Solo Balapan, Madiun, Kertosono, Mojokerto

39 Taksaka Tugu Yogyakarta 20.00 Jakarta Kota 04.16 Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Purwokerto, Jatinegara
40 Taksaka Jakarta Kota 08.15 Tugu Yogyakarta 16.21 Cirebon, Purwokerto, Sumpiuh, Karanganyar
41 Taksaka Tugu Yogyakarta 10.00 Jakarta Kota 17.55 Kutoarjo, Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Purwokerto, Cirebon, Jatinegara
42 Taksaka Jakarta Kota 20.45 Tugu Yogyakarta 04.42 Purwokerto, Sumpiuh, Gombong, Karanganyar, Kutoarjo
43 Purwojaya Cilacap 18.30 Jakarta Gambir 00.30 Maos, Kroya, Purwokerto, Jatinegara
44 Purwojaya Jakarta Gambir 06.35 Cilacap 12.30 Jatinegara, Purwokerto, Kroya
45 Bangunkarta Jombang 17.00 Jakarta Gambir 05.30 Kertosono, Nganjuk, Caruban, Madiun, Paron, Walikukun, Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Pemalang, Tegal, Cirebon, Jatibarang, Jatinegara
46 Bangunkarta Jakarta Gambir 17.00 Jombang 05.20 Jatinegara, Cirebon, Tegal, Pekalongan, Semarang Tawang, Walikukun, Paron, Madiun, Caruban, Nganjuk, Kertosono
48 Harina Bandung 20.30 Surabaya Pasar Turi 13.27 Purwakarta, Cikampek, Cirebon, Tegal, Pekalongan, Semarang Tawang, Lamongan, Bojonegoro, Cepu
47 Harina Suabaya Pasar Turi 14.00 Bandung 04.19 Cepu, Bojonegoro, Lamongan, Semarang Tawang, Pekalongan, Tegal, Cirebon, Cikampek, Purwakarta
19A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 05.30 Jakarta Gambir 08.43 Cimahi, Purwakarta, Jatinegara
20A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 05.45 Bandung 09.08 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
21A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 06.30 Jakarta Gambir 09.55 Cimahi, Padalarang, Purwakarta Bekasi, Jatinegara
22A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 09.15 Bandung 12.38 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cimahi
23A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 11.30 Jakarta Gambir 15.02 Cimahi, Padalarang, Purwakarta, Bekasi, Jatinegara
24A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 11.30 Bandung 14.58 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
25A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 15.00 Jakarta Gambir 18.10 Cimahi,Bekasi, Jatinegara
26A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 16.15 Bandung 19.27 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta, Cimahi
27A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 16.30 Jakarta Gambir 19.52 Cimahi, Purwakarta, Bekasi, Jatinegara
28A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 19.00 Bandung 22.26 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Cimahi
29A Argo Parahyangan Bandung 20.05 Jakarta Gambir 23.30 Bekasi, Jatinegara
30A Argo Parahyangan Jakarta Gambir 20.25 Bandung 23.46 Jatinegara, Bekasi, Purwakarta
7061 Malabar Ekspress Malang 15.30 Bandung 08.37 Blitar, Tulungagung, Kediri, Kertosono, Nganjuk, Madiun, Solo, Klaten, Yogya, Wates, Kebumen, Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Banjar, Tasik
7062 Malabar Ekspress Bandung 15.30 Malang 08.11 Blitar, Tulungagung, Kediri, Kertosono, Nganjuk, Madiun, Solo, Klaten, Yogya, Wates, Kebumen, Karanganyar, Sumpiuh, Kroya, Banjar, Tasik
7063 (senin s/d jumat) Argo Parahyangan Bandung 08.45 Jakarta Gambir 11.58 Cimahi, Bekasi, Jatinegara

Cargo

To anticipate steady number of passengers, PT KAI has boosted cargo deliveries. At May 3, 2011 PT KAI has tried the line from Cikarang Dry Port to Surabaya vice versa. PT Kereta Api and PT Danone Indonesia has made an agreement to carry Danone's water in 2013 to Jakarta. PT Kereta Api Indonesia will replace the track from R33 to R54 between Cicurug and Sukabumi with length 20 kilometers and spends Rp2 trillion ($222 million). One cargo train can replace 40 to 60 trucks.[12] In addition, PT Kereta Api Indonesia also serves trains of coal in South Sumatera.

Library wagon

To popularize more about the business, PT Kereta Api Indonesia will launch Library Wagon which will display documented company activities, small size assets and books. The library wagon will make exhibition for a week in one station and then move to other station.[13]

Joint operation

In December 2011, a memorandum of understanding has been signed between PT Kereta Api Indonesia and Bombardier Transportation AG related with final assembly of diesel-electric TRAXX Asia Locomotives in Surabaya, East Java begins in early 2012 for Southeast Asia market, including for PT Kereta Api itself.[14]

In early March 2012, both parties GE Transportation and PT Kereta Api Indonesia have announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding about services and cooperation. All services will be done in Indonesia by Indonesian workers and makes Traction Motor Remanufacturing Center to serve all ASEAN countries.[15]

Heritage sites

In 2012, PT KAI allocated Rp20 billion ($2.2 million) to restore and renovate 20 heritage sites from at least 260 (680 in the future) heritage sites and historical railways on the islands of Java and Sumatra. One of them is Lawang Sewu (1,000 doors) in Semarang which attracted many tourists which got Rp.1.5 billion ($0.17 million) from tickets revenue per year.[16]

See also

References

  • Note 1: http://www.pu.go.id/Humas/news2003/ppw110804w.htm
  • Note 2: http://www.pu.go.id/ditjen_ruang/Makalah/Paper-Sul-KA-150702.doc
  • de Bruin, Jan. Het Indische spoor in oorlogstijd: de spoor- en tramwegmaatschappijen in Nederlands-Indië in de vuurlinie, 1873-1949
  • Durrant, A.E. Lokomotip Uap
  • Durrant, A.E. PNKA Power Parade
  • de Jong, H. De Locomotieven van Werkspoor
  • de Jong, Michiel van Ballegoijen. Spoorwegstations op Java
  • Ir. Krijthe, De "Bergkoningin" en de spoorwegen in Nederlands-Indië 1862-1949
  • Oegema, J.J.G. De Stoomtractie op Java en Sumatra
  • Sejarah Perkeretaapian Indonesia, volumes 1 and 2
  • PT Kereta Api (Persero)

External links

  • (Indonesian) Official site
  • (Indonesian) Industri Kereta Api, Indonesian railway industry
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