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Sectarian democracy

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Title: Sectarian democracy  
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Sectarian democracy

Sectarian democracies are multiethnic/multifactional countries where the ethnic group with the greatest power has a democratic government that does not allow minorities to participate in the democratic process of that nation.There are several countries that highlight this sort of government.The opposite of sectarian democracy is consociationalistic democracy.

Contents

  • Present-day Iraq 1
  • Apartheid South Africa 2
  • Turkey 3
  • Former Northern Ireland 4

Present-day Iraq

Present day Iraq is a sectarian democracy where the Shiite controls the majority of the government. This is partly because Shiites in Iraq are the dominant religious group and partly because many Sunnis boycotted the elections. Despite the sectionality of the government it must be remembered that there are elected Sunnis and Kurds in power.

Apartheid South Africa

Under apartheid, South Africa was a sectarian democracy which some called a "white only democracy". White South Africans enjoyed the right to vote and to participate in the political process whereas the Black South Africans were oppressed.The end of apartheid brought about consociationalist-like government allowing for powersharing between Black and White South Africans.

Turkey

Present day Turkey is another example of a sectarian democracy where Turkish Muslims have the true right to participate in the political process.

Former Northern Ireland

The political power was concentrated in the hands of the Protestant Unionists and this led to sectarian violence until the establishment of a consociationalist-like government which allowed powersharing between the Protestant Unionists and the Catholic Nationalists.

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