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Anglican Diocese of Southwark

Diocese of Southwark
Location
Ecclesiastical province Canterbury
Archdeaconries Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham & Greenwich, Reigate, Southwark, Wandsworth
Statistics
Parishes 300
Churches 370
Information
Cathedral Southwark Cathedral
Current leadership
Bishop Christopher Chessun, Bishop of Southwark
Suffragans Richard Cheetham, area Bishop of Kingston
Jonathan Clark, area Bishop of Croydon
Michael Ipgrave, area Bishop of Woolwich
Archdeacons Danny Kajumba, Archdeacon of Reigate
Chris Skilton, Archdeacon of Croydon[1][2]
Alastair Cutting, Archdeacon of Lewisham & Greenwich[2]
Jane Steen, Archdeacon of Southwark[2]
Simon Gates, Archdeacon of Lambeth[3]
Tim Marwood, Acting Archdeacon of Wandsworth
Website
southwark.anglican.org
Southwark Cathedral

The Diocese of Southwark [4] is one of the 44 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905[5] from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.[6]

The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991,[7] the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries:[8]

In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

Contents

  • Bishops 1
  • References 2
  • See also 3
  • External links 4

Bishops

Alongside the diocesan Bishop of Southwark (Christopher Chessun), the Diocese has three area (suffragan) bishops: Richard Cheetham, area Bishop of Kingston; Jonathan Clark, area Bishop of Croydon; and Michael Ipgrave, area Bishop of Woolwich. Since 1994 the Bishop of Fulham (currently Jonathan Baker, since 2013) has provided 'alternative episcopal oversight' in the diocese (along with those of London and Rochester) to those parishes which reject the ministry of priests who are women. Baker is licensed as an honorary assistant bishop in Southwark diocese in order to facilitate his work there.

Several other men are licensed as honorary assistant bishops licensed in the diocese:

References

  1. ^ "Archdeacon of Croydon announced". 31 October 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "New Archdeacons for Southwark Diocese". 16 December 2013. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Diocese of Southwark – New Archdeacon of Lambeth
  4. ^ "Southwark", in The Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World (1952), New York: Columbia University Press.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 27777. p. 2169. 21 March 1905. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  6. ^ The London Gazette: no. 27777. p. 2169. 21 March 1905. Retrieved 4 August 2009.
  7. ^ "4: The Dioceses Commission, 1978–2002" (PDF). Church of England. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  8. ^ Diocese of Southwark: Bishops and Officers. Retrieved on 29 June 2012.
  9. ^ Wood, Rt Rev. (Stanley) Mark.  
  10. ^ Doe, Rt Rev. Michael David.  
  11. ^ Harries of Pentregarth, Baron, (Rt Rev. and Rt Hon. Richard Douglas Harries).  
  12. ^ Atksinson, Rt Rev. David John.  
  13. ^ "Chesters AD".   (subscription required)
  14. ^ Selby, Rt Rev. Peter Stephen Maurice.  
  15. ^ Stock, Rt Rev. (William) Nigel.  
  16. ^ "Appointments".  
  17. ^ Waller, Rt Rev. John Stevens.  

See also

External links

  • Diocesan website
  • Churches in the Diocese of Southwark ("A Church Near You" website)

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