World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Bishop of Verdun

 

Bishop of Verdun

Bishopric of Verdun
Fürstbistum Wirten (de)
Principauté de Verdun (fr)
State of the Holy Roman Empire

997–1552

Coat of arms

Toul in the upper half of this map, coloured green and outlined in pink.
Capital Verdun
Government Theocracy
Historical era Middle Ages
 -  County established 10th century
 -  County ceded
    to the bishopric
997
 -  Three Bishoprics
    annexed by France
1552
 -  Peace of Westphalia
    recognises annexation

1648

The Bishopric of Verdun was also a state of the Holy Roman Empire; it was located at the western edge of the Empire and was bordered by France, the Duchy of Luxembourg, and the Duchy of Bar.

According to legend, Peter (774-798), successor of Madalvaeus, was granted temporal lordship of the Diocese by Charlemagne, but this is no longer accepted.[1]

Because of the destruction of the archives in a fire Bishop Dadon (880-923) commissioned the Gesta episcoporum Virodunensium (Chronicle of the Bishops of Verdun) from Bertharius, a Benedictine monk. This was continued to 1250 by a second monk, Lawrence, and later by an anonymous writer.[1]

The Holy Roman Emperor Otto III bestowed the title Count on Bishop Haimon (990-1024) and his successors in 997. The bishops had the right to appoint a temporary "count for life" (comte viager), theoretically subject to the authority of the bishop. These counts were selected from the noble family of Ardennes. There was frequent conflict between the count and the bishop.[1]

The Bishopric was annexed to France in 1552; this was recognized by the Holy Roman Empire in the Peace of Westphalia of 1648. It then was a part of the province of the Three Bishoprics.

Bishops

Fourth century

  • ca.346 : Sanctinus
  • 356-383 : Maurus

Fifth century

  •  ???-420 : Salvinus
  • ca.440 : Arator
  • 454-470 : Polychronius[2]
  • 470-486 : Possessor
  • 486-502 : Freminus (Firminus)

Sixth century

  • 502-529 : Vitonus
  • 529-554 : Desideratus
  • 554-591 : Agericus
  • v.595 : Charimeres

Seventh century

  • v.614 : Harimeris
  •  ???-621 : Ermenfred
  • 623-626 : Godo
  • 641-648 : Paulus
  • 648-665 : Gisloald
  • 665-689 : Gerebert
  • 689-701 : Armonius

Eighth century

  • 701-710 : Agrebert
  • 711-715 : Bertalamius
  • 716 : Abbo
  • 716-722 : Pepo
  • 722-730 : Volchisus
  • 730-732 : Agronius
  • 753-774 : Madalveus
  • 774-798 : Pierre (Peter)
  • 798-802 : Austram

Ninth century

  • 802-824 : Heriland
  • 824-847 : Hilduin
  • 847-870 : Hatton
  • 870-879 : Bernard
  • 880-923 : Dadon, fille de Radald of Rotrude (sister of the preceding)

Tenth century

  • 923-925 : Hugues Ier
  • 925-939 : Bernoin, son of Matfried I, count of Metz and of Lantesinde (sister of Dadon)
  • 939-959 : Bérenger
  • 959-983 : Wigfrid
  • 983-984 : Hugues II
  • 984-984 : Adalbéron I de Verdun, later bishop of Metz
  • 985-990 : Adalbéron II[3]
  • 990-1024 : Heimon (Heymon)

Eleventh century

  • 1024-1039 : Reginbert
  • 1039-1046 : Richard Ier
  • 1047-1089 : Thierry
  • 1089-1107 : Richhar

Twelfth century

  • 1107-1114 : Richard II de Grandpré
  • 1114-1117 : Mazon, administrator
  • 1117-1129 : Henri Ier de Blois, deposed at the Council of Chalon (1129)
  • 1129-1131 : Ursion
  • 1131-1156 : Adalbéron III de Chiny
  • 1156-1162 : Albert Ier de Marcey
  • 1163-1171 : Richard III de Crisse
  • 1172-1181 : Arnoul de Chiny
  • 1181-1186 : Henri II de Castel
  • 1186-1208 : Albert II de Hierges

Thirteenth century

  • 1208-1216 : Robert I de Grandpré
  • 1217-1224 : Jean Ier d'Apremont
  • 1224-1245 : Raoul de Torote
  • 1245-1245 : Guy Ier de Traignel
  • 1245-1247 : Guy II de Mellote
  • 1247-1252 : Jean II de Aix
  • 1252-1255 : Jacques Pantaléon de Court-Palais
  • 1255-1271 : Robert II de Médidan
  • 1271-1273 : Ulrich de Sarvay
  • 1275-1278 : Gerard de Grandson
  • 1278-1286 : Henry III de Grandson
  • 1289-1296 : Jacques II de Ruvigny
  • 1297-1302 : Jean III de Richericourt

Fourteenth century

  • 1303-1305 : Thomas de Blankenberg
  • 1305-1312 : Nicolas Ier de Neuville
  • 1312-1349 : Henri IV de Aspremont
  • 1349-1351 : Otton de Poitiers
  • 1352-1361 : Hugues III de Bar
  • 1362-1371 : Jean IV de Bourbon-Montperoux
  • 1371-1375 : Jean V de Dampierre-St Dizier
  • 1375-1379 : Guy III de Roye
  • 1380-1404 : Leobald de Cousance

Fifteenth century

  • 1404-1419 : Jean VI de Saarbruck
  • 1419-1423 : Louis I of Bar († 1430), administrator
  • 1423-1423 : Raymond
  • 1423-1424 : Guillaume de Montjoie
  • 1424-1430 : Louis I of Bar († 1430), administrator
  • 1430-1437 : Louis de Haraucourt
  • 1437-1449 : Guillaume Fillatre
  • 1449-1456 : Louis de Haraucourt
  • 1457-1500 : Guillaume de Haraucourt

Sixteenth century

  • 1500-1508 : Warry de Dommartin
  • 1508-1522 : Louis de Lorraine[4]
  • 1523-1544 : Jean de Lorraine (1498-1550), brother of predecessor
  • 1544-1547 : Nicolas de Mercœur (1524–1577), nephew of predecessor
  • 1548-1575 : Nicolas Psaume
  • 1576-1584 : Nicolas Bousmard
  • 1585-1587 : Charles de Lorraine[5]
  • 1588-1593 : Nicolas Boucher
  • 1593-1610 : Éric de Lorraine[6]
    • 1593-1601 : Christophe de la Vallée, administrator

Seventeenth century

  • 1610-1622 : Charles de Lorraine (1592 † 1631), nephew of predecessor
  • 1623-1661 : François de Lorraine (1599 † 1672), brother of predecessor
  • 1667-1679 : Armand de Monchy d'Hocquincourt
  • 1681-1720 : Hippolyte de Béthune

Eighteenth century

  • 1721-1754 : Charles-François D'Hallencourt
  • 1754-1769 : Aymar-Fr.-Chrétien-Mi. de Nicolai
  • 1770-1793 : Henri-Louis Rene Desnos

After the Concordat

  • 1823-1830 : Etienne-Bruno-Marie d'Arbou
  • 1826-1831 : François-Joseph de Villeneuve-Esclapon
  • 1832-1836 : Placide-Bruno Valayer
  • 1836-1844 : Augustin-Jean Le Tourneur
  • 1844-1866 : Louis Rossat
  • 1867-1884 : Augustin Hacquard
  • 1884-1887 : Jean-Natalis-François Gonindard
  • 1887-1901 : Jean-Pierre Pagis
  • 1901-1909 : Louis-Ernest Dubois

20th century

  • 1910-1913 : Jean Arturo Chollet
  • 1914-1946 : Charles-Marie-André Ginisty
  • 1946-1963 : Marie-Paul-Georges Petit
  • 1963-1986 : Pierre Francis Lucien Anatole Boillon
  • 1987-1999 : Marcel Paul Herriot

21st century

  • From 2000 : François Paul Marie Maupu

See also

External links

  • Website of the diocese
  • Historia brevis episcoporum Virdunensium

Notes

de:Bistum Verdun fr:Diocèse de Verdun it:Diocesi di Verdun

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.