World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Charles I of Württemberg

Charles I
King of Württemberg
Reign 25 June 1864 – 6 October 1891
Predecessor William I
Successor William II
Born (1823-03-06)6 March 1823
Stuttgart, Kingdom of Württemberg
Died 6 October 1891(1891-10-06) (aged 68)
Stuttgart, Kingdom of Württemberg
Spouse Olga Nikolaevna of Russia
Full name
Karl Friedrich Alexander
House House of Württemberg
Father William I of Württemberg
Mother Pauline Therese of Württemberg
Religion Lutheranism

Charles (German: Karl Friedrich Alexander, König von Württemberg; 6 March 1823 in Stuttgart – 6 October 1891 in Stuttgart) was King of Württemberg, from 25 June 1864 until his death in 1891.

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Marriage and King of Württemberg 2
  • Politics 3
  • Arms 4
  • Ancestry 5
  • Bibliography 6
  • Notes 7
  • External links 8

Early life

He was born 6 March 1823 in Stuttgart, as HRH Charles Frederick Alexander, Crown Prince of Württemberg the son of William I, King of Württemberg (1781–1864) and his third wife (and first cousin) Pauline Therese of Württemberg (1800–1873).

He studied in Berlin and Tübingen.

Marriage and King of Württemberg

On 13 July 1846 he married Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna of Russia, daughter of Tsar Nicholas I and Charlotte of Prussia. Charlotte was a daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. She took the name Alexandra upon her marriage. Karl acceded to the throne upon his father's death in 1864.

The couple had no children, perhaps because of Karl's

Charles I of Württemberg
Born: 6 March 1823 Died: 6 October 1891
Regnal titles
Preceded by
William I
King of Württemberg
1864 – 1891
Succeeded by
William II

External links


  1. ^ a b Sabine Thomsen. Die württembergischen Königinnen. Charlotte Mathilde, Katharina, Pauline, Olga, Charlotte – ihr Leben und Wirken [The Queens of Wuerttemberg: Charlotte Matilde, Katharina, Pauline, Olga, Charlotte – Their Lives and Legacies]. Silberburg-Verlag, 2006.
  2. ^ Jette Sachs-Colignon. Königin Olga von Württemberg, Stieglitz, 2002.
  3. ^ [Mann für Mann, Bernd-Ulrich Hergemöller, Pages 409, 410]
  4. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the  

Notes

  • Queen Olga of Württemberg. Traum der Jugend goldener Stern, Reutlingen, Günther Neske, 1955
  • Jette Sachs-Colignon. Königin Olga von Württemberg, Stieglitz, 2002
  • Paul Sauer. Regent mit mildem Zepter. König Karl von Württemberg, Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt Stuttgart, 1999

For Karl's homosexuality and other familiar issues:

Bibliography

Ancestry

Royal Monogram of King Charles I of Württemberg
Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg, 1817
Royal Monogram of King Charles I of Württemberg, Variant

Arms

He died, childless, in Stuttgart on 6 October 1891, and was succeeded as King of Württemberg by his sister's son, William II. He is buried, together with his wife, in the Old Castle in Stuttgart.

He sided with Austria in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, but after the battle of Sadowa concluded a secret military treaty with Prussia, and took part on her side in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-'71, joining the new German Empire at the close of 1870.[4]

Politics

In 1870, Olga and Karl adopted Olga's niece Vera Konstantinova, the daughter of her brother Grand Duke Konstantin.

[1]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.