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Child-on-child sexual abuse

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Title: Child-on-child sexual abuse  
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Child-on-child sexual abuse

Child-on-child sexual abuse is a form of [2] In many instances, the initiator exploits the other child's naïveté, and the victim is unaware of the nature of what is happening to them. When sexual abuse is perpetrated by one sibling upon another, it is known as "intersibling abuse".[3]

Etiology and causes

In the etiology of child-on-child sexual abuse, young children who have not matured sexually are incapable of knowing about specific sex acts without an external source.[4][5][6] Consequently, children who initiate or solicit overtly sexual acts with other children most often have been sexually victimized by an adult beforehand,[4][5][7] or by another child who was in turn abused by an adult.[8][9] More than half have been victimized by two or more perpetrators.[6] In some instances, the perpetrating child was exposed to pornography or repeatedly witnessed sexual activity of adults at a very young age, and this can also be considered a form of child sexual abuse.[7]

In other cases, a child or adolescent may have no intent to cause any harm to another child, and he or she acts merely on a passing impulse. However, this act may still result in harm to the another child and is a form of child-on-child sexual abuse. [10]

Prevalence

The incidence of child-on-child sexual abuse is not known with any certainty, similar to abuse by adults. It frequently goes unreported because it is not widely known of in the public,[2] and often occurs outside of adults' supervision. Even if known by adults, it is sometimes dismissed as harmless by those who do not understand the implications.[2] In particular, intersibling abuse is under-reported relative to the reporting rates for parent-child sexual abuse,[3] and disclosure of the incest by the victim during childhood is rare.[11]

Effects

Children who were sexually victimized by other minors, including inter-sibling abuse, show largely the same problems as children victimized by adults, including anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse, suicide, eating disorders, post traumatic stress disorder, sleep disorders and difficulty trusting peers in the context of relationships.[1][12] The victim often has distorted beliefs about what happened to them, sometimes even thinking they were the initiator or that they went through the act voluntarily.[11]

Major factors that affect the severity of symptoms include the use of force or coercion, the frequency of the abuse, and the invasiveness of the act.[13] An increased risk of victimization later in life has also been reported.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Shaw, J (2000). "Child on child sexual abuse: Psychological perspectives". Child Abuse & Neglect 24 (12): 1591–1600.  
  2. ^ a b c Loseke, Donileen R.; Gelles, Richard J. and Cavanaugh, Mary M. (2005). Current Controversies on Family Violence. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.  
  3. ^ a b John V. Caffaroa, Allison Conn-Caffaro (July–August 2005). "Treating sibling abuse families". Aggression and Violent Behavior (Elsevier) 10 (5): 604–623.  
  4. ^ a b Drew Pinsky, MD and Ted Stryker (November 5, 2007) "Loveline" (audio interview, 0:38:45-0:40:31). lovelineshow.com. Retrieved November 15, 2007.
  5. ^ a b Bromberg, Daniel S.; Johnson, Blair T. (2001). "Sexual interest in children, child sexual abuse, and psychological sequelae for children". Psychology in the Schools 38 (4): 343–355.  
  6. ^ a b Gray, A; Pithers, WD; Busconi, A; Houchens, P (1999). "Developmental and etiological characteristics of children with sexual behavior problems: Treatment implications". Child abuse & neglect 23 (6): 601–21.  
  7. ^ a b Gray, Alison; Busconi, Aida; Houchens, Paul; Pithers, William D. (1997). "Children with sexual behavior problems and their caregivers: Demographics, functioning, and clinical patterns". Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 9 (4): 267–290.  
  8. ^ Marshall,W.L. (1997). Pedophilia: Psychopathology and theory. In D. R. Laws &W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Theory, assessment, and treatment (pp. 152–174). New York: Guilford.
  9. ^ Wieckowski, Edward; Hartsoe, Peggy; Mayer, Arthur; Shortz, Joianne (1998). Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment 10 (4): 293–303.  
  10. ^ "Do Children Sexually Abuse Other Children? Preventing Sexual Abuse Among Children and Youth", "Stop It Now!", 2007
  11. ^ a b Carlson, Bonnie E.; MacIol, Katherine; Schneider, Joanne (2006). "Sibling Incest: Reports from Forty-One Survivors". Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 15 (4): 19–34.  
  12. ^ Jane M. Rudd, and Sharon D. Herzbergerb (September 1999). "Brother-sister incest—father-daughter incest: a comparison of characteristics and consequences". Child Abuse & Neglect 23 (9): 915–928.  
  13. ^ Brown, Janelle C., Ph.D. (September, 2004). "Child-on-child sexual abuse: An investigation of behavioral and emotional sequelae," University of Pennsylvania, p. 1539.
  14. ^ Arata, Catalina M. (2006). "Child Sexual Abuse and Sexual Re-victimization". Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice 9 (2): 135–164.  
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