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Counts and dukes of Maine

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Title: Counts and dukes of Maine  
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Subject: Counts and dukes of Anjou, House of Plantagenet, Henry II of England, Pepin I of Aquitaine, Counts of Maine
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Counts and dukes of Maine

This is a list of counts and dukes of Maine, with their capital at Le Mans. In the thirteenth century it was annexed by France to the royal domain.

Dukes of Maine (duces Cenomannicus)

  • Charivius (fl. 723) – appears as dux in a document of 723. Controlled twelve counties and the Diocese of Le Mans
  • Grifo (748–749) – given the twelve counties of Maine by his brother, Pepin the Short, as appeasement, but rebelled the next year.
  • Charles the Younger (790–811) – given the ducatus Cenomannicus to govern by his father, Charlemagne.
  • Lothair I (817–831) – given the ducatus as part of a division of the realm by his father, Louis the Pious.
  • Pepin I (831–838) – given the ducatus as part of a re-division of the realm by his father, Louis the Pious.
  • Charles the Bald (838–851) – given the ducatus on the death of Pepin by their father, Louis the Pious.
  • Robert the Strong (851/3–856) – given Main, Anjou, and Touraine as dux and missus dominicus. Rebelled in 856.
  • Louis the Stammerer (856–858) – granted the twelve counties and a court at Le Mans by his father, Charles the Bald, until chased away by Breton rebels.

Counts of Maine

Dukes of Maine (ducs du Maine)

In 1673, the title began to be used again. It was revived by Louis XIV for his first illegitimate son by his infamous mistress, Françoise-Athénaïs, marquise de Montespan. He used it until his death and also founded the semi-royal house of Bourbon du Maine, named after his title.

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