World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Crops

Article Id: WHEBN0000291135
Reproduction Date:

Title: Crops  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Aeolian processes
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Crops

For other uses, see Crop (disambiguation).



A crop is a volunteered or cultivated plant (any plant) whose product is harvested by a human at some point of its growth stage. Plants which have not been cultivated but whose product are harvested, are not really classified as crops. The same goes for plants which have been planted, but are never harvested. Flowers are classified as crops because when it has been cultivated, its harvesting also include the aesthetic purpose it serves. Crops refer to plants of same kind that are grown on a large scale for food, clothing, and other human uses. They are non-animal species or varieties grown to be harvested as food, livestock fodder, fuel or for any other economic purpose (for example, for use as dyes, medicinal, and cosmetic use).

Major crops include sugarcane, pumpkin, maize (corn), wheat, rice, cassava, soybeans, hay, potatoes and cotton.[1] While the term "crop" most commonly refers to plants, it can also include species from other biological kingdoms. For example, mushrooms like shiitake, which are in the fungi kingdom, can be referred to as "crops". In addition, certain species of algae are also cultivated, although it is also harvested from the wild. In contrast, animal species that are raised by humans are called livestock, except those that are kept as pets. Microbial species, such as bacteria or viruses, are referred to as cultures. Microbes are not typically grown for food, but are rather used to alter food. For example, bacteria are used to ferment milk to produce yogurt.

Based on the growing season, the crops grown in India can be classified as kharif crop and rabi crops.

See also

Plants portal
Biology portal
Agriculture portal
Gardening portal
Food portal

References

Further reading

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.