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Demetrius III Eucaerus

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Title: Demetrius III Eucaerus  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Seleucid Empire, Antiochus VIII Grypus, Demetrius III, 88 BC, Diogenes of Judea
Collection: 1St-Century Bc Asian Rulers, 80S Bc Deaths, 88 Bc, 88 Bc Deaths, Seleucid Rulers, Year of Birth Unknown
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Demetrius III Eucaerus

Coin of Demetrius III.
Obv: Diademed head of Demetrius III.
Rev: Figure of Atargatis, veiled, holding flower, barley stalks at each shoulder. Greek legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ "King Demetrius, God, Father-loving and Saviour".

Demetrius III (died 88 BC), called Eucaerus ("well-timed" possibly a misunderstanding of the derogative name Akairos, "the untimely one"), Philopator and Soter, was a ruler of the Seleucid kingdom, the son of Antiochus VIII Grypus and his wife Tryphaena.

By the assistance of Ptolemy IX Lathyros, king of Egypt, he recovered part of his father's Syrian dominions ca. 95 BC, and held his court at Damascus,[1] from where he tried to enlarge his dominions. To the south he defeated the Maccabean king Alexander Jannaeus in battle, following an assistance request of Jewish rebels, but the hostility of the local Jewish population forced him to withdraw. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and the Parthian Empire, and taken prisoner. He was kept in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b  

External links

  • Demetrius III Eucaerus at Livius: Articles on Ancient History
  • Demetrius III Eucaerus at the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
Demetrius III Eucaerus
Born: Unknown Died: 88 BC
Preceded by
Seleucus VI Epiphanes
Seleucid King
95 BC
with Antiochus X Eusebes
Antiochus XI Epiphanes
Philip I Philadelphus
Succeeded by
Philip I Philadelphus or Antiochus XII Dionysus


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