World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Democratic Rally

Democratic Rally
Leader Averof Neofytou
Founder Glafkos Klerides
Founded July 4, 1976 (1976-07-04)
Preceded by United Party[1]
Headquarters Nicosia, Cyprus
Ideology Conservatism[2]
Christian democracy[2]
Pro-Europeanism
Political position Centre-right[3][4]
International affiliation Centrist Democrat International,
International Democrat Union
European affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament group European People's Party
Colours Blue
House of Representatives
20 / 56
European Parliament
2 / 6
Website
.cy.org.disywww
Politics of Cyprus
Political parties
Elections

The Democratic Rally (Greek: Δημοκρατικός Συναγερμός, Dimokratikós Sinagermós, DISY), is a conservative[5] and Christian-democratic[5][6] political party in Cyprus, led by Nicos Anastasiades, the president of the Republic of Cyprus.[7] The party was founded on 4 July 1976 by veteran politician Glafkos Klerides. Klerides served as the president of Cyprus from 1993 until 2003.

DISY serves a diverse spectrum of voters, ranging from hardline nationalists and anti-communists to modern liberals with post-materialist and post-modern values who advocate human rights.[8] DISY's platform focuses on free enterprise economic policies and a practical solution to the inter-communal problem. It is the most explicitly pro-Western and pro-NATO of Cyprus's parties, and draws its support from middle-class professionals, businessmen, and white-collar employees.[9]

DISY is a member of the European People's Party (EPP). In the 2004 European Parliamentary Election it gained 28.2% of the vote, and elected 2 MEPs, Ioannis Casoulides and Panayiotis Demetriou, who joined the EPP-ED Group along with former DISY president Yannakis Matsis.

The leaders of the Democratic Rally support practical solutions to solving the Cyprus problem and supported the Annan Plan for the re-unification of Cyprus in 2004, believing that further adjustments could be made afterwards. Following the rejection by the Greek Cypriot Community, four MPs (Sillouris, Prodromou, Erotokritou, Taramoundas) who had opposed the party line were expelled and a number of members willingly resigned. The expelled MPs formed a party called European Democracy. In 2005 European Democracy merged with New Horizons and created European Party. Former party president Yiannakis Matsis headed a splinter coalition called For Europe in the European Parliamentary Election. Matsis gained a seat in the European parliament, also joining the EPP group (while still remaining a member of DISY).

In the legislative elections of 21 May 2006, the party won 30.52% of the popular vote and 18 out of 56 available seats, and in the legislative elections of 22 May 2011, the party won 34.27% of the popular vote and 20 out of 56 available seats. The party's candidate, Nicos Anastasiades, won the 2013 presidential elections, ended the five years rule of the Progressive Party of Working People (AKEL).

Contents

  • See also 1
  • Further reading 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

See also

Further reading

  • Neofytos Loizides (2012). Transformations of the Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot Right: Right-wing Peace-makers?. Beyond a Divided Cyprus: A State and Society in Transformation (Palgrave Macmillan). pp. 185–201.  

References

  1. ^ Neofytos Loizides (2012). Transformations of the Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot Right: Right-wing Peace-makers?. Beyond a Divided Cyprus: A State and Society in Transformation (Palgrave Macmillan). p. 186.  
  2. ^ a b Parties and Elections in Europe: The database about parliamentary elections and political parties in Europe, by Wolfram Nordsieck
  3. ^ Neophytos Loizides (2015). Challenging Partition in Five Success Stories. Resolving Cyprus: New Approaches to Conflict Resolution (I.B. Tauris). p. 181. 
  4. ^ Nathalie Tocci (2007). Greece, Turkey and Cyprus. European Politics (Oxford University Press). p. 125. 
  5. ^ a b Hans Slomp (30 September 2011). Europe, A Political Profile: An American Companion to European Politics: An American Companion to European Politics. ABC-CLIO. p. 690.  
  6. ^ Jeff Haynes; Anja Hennig (3 July 2013). Religious Actors in the Public Sphere: Means, Objectives, and Effects. Routledge. p. 17.  
  7. ^ http://www.elections.gov.cy/English/Islandwide
  8. ^ Giorgos Charalambous (2015). The Party Politics of the Problem. Resolving Cyprus. p. 50. 
  9. ^ [2]

External links

  • Official website
  • Nedisy.org, Youth branch
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.