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Dragan Čović

 

Dragan Čović

Dragan Čović
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Assumed office
17 July 2015
Prime Minister Denis Zvizdić
Preceded by Mladen Ivanić
In office
27 June 2003 – 28 February 2004
Prime Minister Adnan Terzić
Preceded by Borislav Paravac
Succeeded by Sulejman Tihić
In office
2 April 2003 – 10 April 2003
Prime Minister Adnan Terzić
Preceded by Mirko Šarović
Succeeded by Borislav Paravac
Croat Member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Assumed office
17 November 2014
Preceded by Željko Komšić
In office
5 October 2002 – 9 May 2005
Preceded by Jozo Križanović
Succeeded by Ivo Miro Jović
Chairperson of the House of Peoples
In office
9 February 2012 – 17 November 2014
Deputy Ognjen Tadić
Preceded by Ognjen Tadić
Succeeded by Bariša Čolak
Minister of Finance of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
In office
12 December 1998 – 11 January 2001
Prime Minister Edhem Bičakčić
Preceded by Ognjen Tadić
Succeeded by Nikola Grabovac
President of the Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Assumed office
4 June 2005
Preceded by Bariša Čolak
Personal details
Born (1956-08-20) 20 August 1956
Mostar, Yugoslavia
(now Bosnia and Herzegovina)
Political party Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Spouse(s) Bernardica Čović
Children Sanja
Daniela
Alma mater University of Mostar
University of Sarajevo
Religion Roman Catholicism

Dragan Čović (pronounced ; born 20 August 1956) is a Bosnian Croat politician and leader of the Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina (HDZ BiH) party.

Biography

Dragan Čović was born in Mostar. He attended elementary school and technical high school of mechanical engineering in Mostar and graduated in 1975. After high school he entered the Faculty of Engineering at Džemal Bijedić University in Mostar and graduated in 1979 gaining a title of mechanical engineer. In 1980 he started working as an employee in SOKO company in Mostar, where he worked in technology and control sections. From 1986 to 1992 he did various managerial jobs, such as director of business unit, director of production and vice president for industrialization. Čović gained a master's degree in 1989 at the Faculty of Engineering in Mostar, and from 1989 to 1991 he attended studies of management at the Faculty of Economy at the University of Sarajevo. From 1992 to 1998 he was the general director of SOKO. He obtained a PhD from the University of Mostar in 1996.

From 1994 to 1996 he taught Economics and Organization of Production as a senior assistant at the Faculty of Engineering in Mostar, after which he was named assistant professor and taught Development of Production Systems. Four years later, he became an associate professor and in 2004 he was a full professor of the University of Mostar. He worked at the Faculty of Economy in Mostar and also in regular and postgraduate studies. In 2007, he also became a professor at the University of Philosophy in Mostar.

Political career

In 1994, Čović joined the Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina (HDZ). Two years later, he became a member of the cantonal committee of HDZ, and in 1997 he became the president of the city committee of HDZ in Mostar. A year later, he became vice president of HDZ and in 2005 he was elected President. From 1998–2001, Čović was Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance in the Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

At the general election in 2002 he was elected as member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina with 114,606 votes. He was a Presidency member until 29 March 2005, when he was removed from office by the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Paddy Ashdown, for abuse of power and position. In November 2006 Čović was sentenced to 5 years in prison for exempting the company Lijanović of paying taxes on import of meat. He appealed and the Council of Bosnia and Herzegovina rejected the sentence because of the incompetence of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2009, Čović was accused of spending public funds to buy private homes for certain people. In April 2010, he was acquitted. On 14 May 2010, a third indictment for Čović and six other persons was confirmed by the Court of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton (HNC), this time for abuse of power and position. He and other committee members of the Croatian Post and Telecom (HPT) were accused of transferring a debt of nearly 4,7 million Convertibile Marks from the non-existing Ministry of Defence of the Croatian Defence Council to three private companies.

By receiving the debt, those three companies became owners of shares in Eronet, the most profitable telecommunicational section of the HPT. At the time, Čović was Federal Minister of Finance and president of the Steering Committee of the HPT. The Court of the HNC asked that this case be brought in front of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, but the Supreme Court of the Federation decided that the case had to be solved in Mostar. In May 2012, Čović was acquitted.

In May 2011 he became a member of the House of Peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina and in February 2012 he was named Chairman of the House of Peoples.

External links and references

Political offices
Preceded by
Jozo Križanović
Croat Member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2002–2005
Succeeded by
Ivo Miro Jović
Preceded by
Mirko Šarović
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2003
Succeeded by
Borislav Paravac
Preceded by
Borislav Paravac
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2003–2004
Succeeded by
Sulejman Tihić
Preceded by
Ognjen Tadić
Chairperson of the House of Peoples
2012–2014
Succeeded by
Bariša Čolak
Preceded by
Željko Komšić
Croat Member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2014–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Mladen Ivanić
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2015–present
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