Eadhæd

Eadhæd
Bishop of Ripon
Church Catholic
See Diocese of Ripon
In office c679–?
Predecessor new foundation
Personal details
Previous post Bishop of Lindsey

Eadhæd (or Eadhedus or Eadheath or Eadhaed) was a medieval Bishop of Lindsey and Bishop of Ripon.

He was a companion of Chad of Mercia.[1] He was consecrated in 678. He was expelled from Lindsey and was made Bishop of Ripon around 679.[2] This was part of the process whereby Bishop Wilfrid of York's large diocese was broken into three parts, with new bishoprics established at York, Hexham and Ripon.[3] Along with Eadhæd, Bosa was appointed to York and Eata was appointed to Hexham.[4][5] The medieval chronicler Bede, in his work Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, barely mentions Eadhæd outside of the division of the diocese.[3] It appears that the see of Ripon was especially created to find a place for Eadhæd after his expulsion from Lindsey, for bishops were not usually appointed to that see.[6]

Notes

References

External links

  • Prosopography of Anglo Saxon England entry for Eadhæd
Catholic Church titles
New title
New foundation
Bishop of Lindsey
678–c679
Succeeded by
Æthelwine
New title
new foundation
Bishop of Ripon
679–?
merged


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