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Energy in Europe

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Energy in Europe

Energy in Europe describes energy and electricity production, consumption and import in Europe. Energy policy of Europe will describe more in detail the politics of Europe related to energy. Electricity sector in Europe is the main article of electricity in Europe.

Primary energy use and countries

Energy use per capita

The European primary energy use per capita (TWh/per million) was highest in 2008 in: 1) Iceland 191, 2) Luxembourg 98 and 3) Finland 77.[1]

Primary energy per million people TWh (2008):1) Iceland 191, 2) Luxembourg 98, 3) Finland 77, 4) Norway 72, 5) Belgium 64, 6) Sweden 62, 7) Netherlands 56.4, 8) Russia 56.3, 9) Kazakhstan 53, 10) Czech Republic 11) 50, France 48, 12) Germany 47, 13) Estonia 47 and 14) Austria 46. Energy use per capita was the lowest in Moldova 10, Armenia 11 and Turkey 16.

Primary energy in Europe[1]
# TWh capita TWh/million
1 Russia 7,987 141.79 56
2 Germany 3,899 82.12 47
3 France 3,099 64.12 48
4 United Kingdom 2,424 61.35 40
5 Italy 2,047 59.89 34
6 Spain 1,614 45.59 35
7 Ukraine 1,583 46.26 34
8 Turkey 1,146 71.08 16
9 Poland 1,138 38.12 30
10 Netherlands 927 16.44 56
11 Kazakhstan 825 15.68 53
12 Belgium 681 10.71 64
13 Sweden 577 9.26 62
14 Czech Republic 519 10.43 50
15 Romania 458 21.51 21
16 Finland 410 5.31 77
17 Austria 387 8.34 46
18 Greece 354 11.24 31
19 Norway 345 4.77 72
20 Belarus 327 9.68 34
21 Switzerland 311 7.71 40
22 Portugal 281 10.62 26
23 Bulgaria 230 7.62 30
24 Denmark 221 5.49 40
25 Ireland 174 4.44 39
26 Azerbaijan 155 8.68 18
27 Croatia 106 4.43 24
28 Estonia 63 1.34 47
29 Iceland 61 0.32 191
30 Luxembourg 48 0.49 98
31 Moldova 37 3.63 10
32 Armenia 35 3.08 11
33 Cyprus 30 0.80 38
34 Malta 10 0.41 23
Mtoe = 11.63 TWh. Prim. energy includes energy losses

Electricity in Europe

Twelve newer EU Member States in Central and Eastern Europe plan to increase wind power capacity from the 6.4 gigawatts installed at end of 2012 to 16 gigawatts by 2020.[2][3]

If renewable electricity production in the EU continued to grow at the same rate as it did from 2005 to 2010 it would account for 36.4% of electricity in 2020 and 51.6% in 2030 following:[4]

RE of total electricity (%)
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2020 2030
13.6 14.2 15.1 16.4 18.2 21.2 36.4 51.6

See also

References

  1. ^ a b IEA Key energy statistics 2010 Page: Country specific indicator numbers from page 48
  2. ^ Wind power for 9 million households in Eastern Europe by 2020 05 Feb 2013
  3. ^ Eastern winds, Emerging European wind power markets February 2013
  4. ^ EU met its 2010 Renewable electricity target - ambitious 2030 target needed EWEA 12 January 2012
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