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Henri Queuille

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Title: Henri Queuille  
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Subject: René Pleven, Georges Bidault, Robert Schuman, Camille Chautemps, René Mayer
Collection: 1884 Births, 1970 Deaths, French Interior Ministers, French Military Personnel of World War I, French Ministers of Agriculture, French Ministers of Finance, French Ministers of Health, French Ministers of Posts, Telegraphs, and Telephones, French Senators of the Third Republic, Members of the Chamber of Deputies of the French Third Republic, Members of the National Assembly of the French Fourth Republic, People from Corrèze, Politicians from Limousin, Prime Ministers of France, Radical Party (France) Politicians, Transport Ministers of France
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Henri Queuille

Henri Queuille
Prime Minister of France
In office
10 March 1951 – 11 August 1951
Preceded by René Pleven
Succeeded by René Pleven
In office
2 July 1950 – 12 July 1950
Preceded by Georges Bidault
Succeeded by René Pleven
In office
11 September 1948 – 28 October 1949
Preceded by Robert Schuman
Succeeded by Georges Bidault
Personal details
Born 31 March 1884
Neuvic, Corrèze
Died 15 June 1970(1970-06-15) (aged 86)
Paris
Political party Radical

Henri Queuille (French: ; 31 March 1884 – 15 June 1970) was a French Radical politician prominent in the Third and Fourth Republics. After World War II, he served three times as Prime Minister.

He was the son of a noblewoman.

Contents

  • Governments 1
    • First ministry (11 September 1948 – 28 October 1949) 1.1
    • Second ministry (2 – 12 July 1950) 1.2
    • Third ministry (10 March – 11 August 1951) 1.3
  • References 2

Governments

First ministry (11 September 1948 – 28 October 1949)

Changes:

  • 12 January 1949 – Maurice Petsche succeeds Queuille as Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs.
  • 13 February 1949 – Robert Lecourt succeeds Marie as Vice President of the Council and Minister of Justice.

Second ministry (2 – 12 July 1950)

Third ministry (10 March – 11 August 1951)

Political offices
Preceded by
Joseph Capus
Minister of Agriculture
1924–1925
Succeeded by
Jean Durand
Preceded by
François Binet
Minister of Agriculture
1926–1928
Succeeded by
Jean Hennessy
Preceded by
Jean Hennessy
Minister of Agriculture
1930
Succeeded by
Fernand David
Preceded by
Désiré Ferry
Minister of Public Health
1930–1931
Succeeded by
Camille Blaisot
Preceded by
Louis Rollin
Minister of Posts, Telegraphs and Telephones
1932
Succeeded by
Laurent Eynac
Preceded by
Abel Gardey
Minister of Agriculture
1932–1934
Succeeded by
Émile Casset
Preceded by
Louis Marin
Minister of Public Health and Physical Education
1934–1935
Succeeded by
Louis Lafont
Preceded by
Albert Bedouce
Minister of Public Works
1937–1938
Succeeded by
Jules Moch
Preceded by
Georges Monnet
Minister of Agriculture
1938–1940
Succeeded by
Paul Thellier
Preceded by
(none)
Minister of Supply
1940
Succeeded by
Albert Chichery
Preceded by
(none)
Minister of State
1948
Succeeded by
(none)
Preceded by
Christian Pineau
Minister of Public Works, Transport and Tourism
1948
Succeeded by
Christian Pineau
Preceded by
Robert Schuman
Prime Minister of France
1948–1949
Succeeded by
Georges Bidault
Preceded by
Christian Pineau
Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs
1948–1949
Succeeded by
Maurice Petsche
Preceded by
Robert Lecourt
Deputy Prime Minister of France
1949–1950
Succeeded by
Georges Bidault
Preceded by
Georges Bidault
Prime Minister of France
1950
Succeeded by
René Pleven
Preceded by
Jules Moch
Minister of the Interior
1950–1951
Succeeded by
Charles Brune
Preceded by
René Pleven
Prime Minister of France
1951
Succeeded by
René Pleven
Preceded by
(none)
Minister of State
1951–1952
Succeeded by
François Mitterrand
Preceded by
René Mayer
Deputy Prime Minister of France
1952–1954
Succeeded by
(none)

References

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