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Homily

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Title: Homily  
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Subject: Mass (liturgy), Gospel (liturgy), Words of Institution, Homiletics, Credo
Collection: Christian Genres, Christian Sermons, Christian Terminology, Homiletics
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Homily

A homily is a commentary that follows a reading of scripture.[1] In Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and Eastern Orthodox Churches, a homily is usually given during Mass (Divine Liturgy for Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches, and Divine Service for the Lutheran Church) at the end of the Liturgy of the Word. Many people consider it synonymous with a sermon.[1]

Contents

  • Etymology 1
  • Roman Catholic Mass homily 2
  • Other senses 3
  • See also 4
  • Footnotes 5
  • External links 6

Etymology

According to The Catholic Encyclopedia:[2]

The word homily is derived from the Greek word ὁμιλία homilia (from ὁμιλεῖν homilein), which means to have communion or hold verbal intercourse with a person. In this sense homilia is used in 1 Corinthians 15:33. In Luke 24:14, we find the word homiloun, and in Acts 24:26, homilei, both used in the sense of "speaking with". Origen was the first to distinguish between logos (sermo) and homilia (tractatus). Since Origen's time homily has meant, and still means, a commentary, without formal introduction, division, or conclusion, on some part of Sacred Scripture, the aim being to explain the literal, and evolve the spiritual, meaning of the Sacred Text. The latter, as a rule, is the more important; but if, as in the case of Origen, more attention be paid to the former, the homily will be called expository rather than moral or hortatory. It is the oldest form of Christian preaching.

Roman Catholic Mass homily

The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM)

Other senses

Contemporary Protestant clergy often use the term 'homily' to describe a short sermon, such as one created for a wedding or funeral.[1]

In colloquial usage, homily often means a sermon concerning a practical matter, a moralizing lecture or admonition, or an inspirational saying or platitude.[1]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d Homilies for Sundays and Holidays
  2. ^

External links

  • Daily Homilies Website
  • Read Malayalam and English Homilies, Reflections and Talks By Archbishop Soosa Pakiam, Metropolitan Archdiocese of Trivandrum
  • 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal – England and Wales edition (pdf)
  • Homily Points
  • The Homilies of Father Robert S. Smith – Smith's Homilies
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