How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics

How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics
Author Calvert Watkins
Language English
Subject Comparative Indo-European poetics
Genre Non-fiction
Published 1995, Oxford University Press
Media type Print
Pages 640 pages
ISBN

How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics is a 1995 book about comparative Indo-European poetics by the linguist and classicist Calvert Watkins. It was first published on November 16, 1995 through Oxford University Press and is both an introduction to comparative poetics and an investigation of the myths about dragon-slayers found in different times and in different Indo-European languages.[1] Watkins received a 1998 Goodwin Award of Merit from the American Philological Association for his work on the book.[2]

Synopsis

The book consists of seven parts and 59 chapters and in the book Watkins uses a methodology of a combination of extremely close reading of text passages in the original with the comparative method. He claims that it is not possible to understand fully the traditional elements in an early Indo-European poetic text without the background of what he calls a "genetic intertextuality" of particular formulas and themes in all languages of the family.

Reception

Critical reception for the text since its release has been positive.[3][4][5]The Classical Journal and The Journal of American Folklore both gave How to Kill a Dragon positive reviews,[6] and The Journal of American Folklore remarked that it was a "landmark book".[7] The Journal of the American Oriental Society also praised the book, which they viewed as a "new puthmen, a fundamentum which must henceforth serve as the starting point and inspiration for a discipline whose future is now secure."[8]

References

  1. ^ Floyd, Edwin D. "The Persistence of "Man-Slaying" as an Indo-European formula in Gregory of Nazianzus". University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Goodwin Award of Merit - Previous Winners". APA. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  3. ^ Kelly, David H (1998). "How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics (review)". The Classical World 1992 (2): 175–176. doi:10.2307/4352252. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  4. ^ Allen, N.J. (2000). "`How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics,' by Calvert Watkins.(review)". The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 6 (1): 159–160. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Justus, Carol F (Sep 1997). "How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics by Calvert Watkins (review)". Language 73 (3): 637–641. doi:10.2307/415905. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  6. ^ Dunkel, G. E. (Apr–May 1997). "How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics by Calvert Watkins (review)". The Classical Journal 92 (4): 417–422. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  7. ^ McCarthy, William Bernard (Spring 1999). "How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics by Calvert Watkins (review)". The Journal of American Folklore 112 (444): 220–222. doi:10.2307/541955. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  8. ^ Klein, Jared S (April–June 1997). "How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics (review)". The Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (2): 397–398. doi:10.2307/605527. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
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