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Imperial Crypt Vaults

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Imperial Crypt Vaults

The Imperial Crypt Vaults are the various chambers of the Imperial Crypt in Vienna, Austria, in which most members of the senior lines of the Habsburg dynasty, the hereditary Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, have been entombed, beginning in 1632.

The Imperial Crypt Vaults are an interconnected series of ten subterranean vaulted rooms, built at various times as more space was needed.

The visible 107 metal sarcophagi and 5 heart urns range in style from puritan plain to exuberant rococo. The Imperial Crypt is one of the top tourist attractions in Vienna.

The bodies of 145 nobles, plus urns containing the hearts or cremated remains of four others, are deposited here. There is only one space left. They include 12 Emperors and 18 Empresses. The most recent entombment150 was in 2011.

From other families there are 32 spouses, plus four others,15 41 47 117 who have found their resting place here. Everyone else in the Imperial Crypt was born with the Habsburgs-only title of Archduke or Archduchess.

In 1960, with the various vaults overcrowded, a major rearrangement project began which resulted in the construction of the Children's Columnbarium and the New Vault. At the same time many bodies were moved to those new areas, others were moved from the Tuscan Vault and Ferdinand’s Vault and walled up into the corner piers of Ferdinand's Vault.

Subscript numbers behind the names of most persons listed in this article are used to avoid confusion in cross-references due to the similarity or duplication of names over the many generations. A unique small index number appears with the name of every person buried in the Imperial Crypt. The number corresponds with that person's entry in the listing below of occupants of each Vault, to which it is hyperlinked. When necessary to establish continuity, a person buried elsewhere is assigned a number preceded by an x and then listed in the Selected Other Habsburgs section.

The Founders' Vault

The Gründergruft is the oldest part of the Kaisergruft, dating from the original construction of the church (completed in 1632), and lies under the Emperor Chapel at the left of the nave of the church above. The room is low, plain, and windowless, and visible through baroque gates from Leopold’s Vault. Here stand the two plain sarcophagi of the founding couple.

Looking through the gate, from left to right:

  • 1 Empress Anna of Tyrol (4 October 1585 – 15 December 1618) →Family Tree Daughter of Ferdinand II, Duke of Tyrol and wife of her cousin Emperor Matthias2 who was 28 years older than she was. She provided in her will of 1617 for the establishment of a crypt for her and her husband in a Capuchin's Church to be built in Vienna, and died only one year later, at age 33 after seven years of a childless marriage. Her heart is buried in urn 1 in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche. Her intestines are buried in urn 17 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.

Leopold's Vault

The Leopoldsgruft was built under the nave of the church above, beginning in 1657 by Emperor Leopold I,37 following the edict of his father Emperor Ferdinand III27 that the hereditary burial place of the imperial family would be in this church. Considering that Leopold contributed his three wives and 16 of his children—plus himself—to the population of the crypt, it was inevitable that other vaults would be needed soon.

Children's Columbarium

Turning to the left of the gates to the Founders’ Vault, in the thick east foundation wall of the church are twelve longitudinal recessed niches built in the 1960s containing sarcophagi of 12 children. The coffins had previously been in either the Founders’ Vault or the main hall of this vault, but were generally in poor condition and have now been placed into identical cases. No markings or documentation identifies which child lies in which coffin, but those buried in these niches are:

Four children of Emperor Ferdinand III27:

  • 3 Archduke Maximilian Thomas (1638–1639) →Family Tree Infant son of Emperor Ferdinand III27 and Empress Maria Anna.22
  • 4 Archduke Philipp August (1637–1639) →Family Tree Two-year old son of Emperor Ferdinand III27 and Empress Maria Anna.22
  • 5 Archduchess Theresia Maria (1652–1653) →Family Tree Infant daughter of Emperor Ferdinand III27 and Empress Eleonora.19

Seven children of Emperor Leopold I37:

  • 7 Archduke Ferdinand Wenzel (1667–1668) →Family Tree Infant son of Emperor Leopold I37 and Empress Margarita Teresa.20 His intestines are buried in urn 25 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • 11 Archduchess Anna Maria Sophia (1674) →Family Tree Infant daughter of Emperor Leopold I37 and Empress Claudia Felicitas.24 Her viscera are buried in urn 30 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • 12 Archduchess Maria Josepha (1675–1676) →Family Tree Infant daughter of Emperor Leopold I37 and Empress Claudia Felicitas.24 Her heart is in a gold and silver urn atop her mother's sarcophagus in the Dominican Church. Her viscera are buried in urn 32 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • 13 Archduchess Christina (1679) →Family Tree Infant daughter of Emperor Leopold I37 and Empress Eleonora Magdelena.32
  • 14 Archduchess Maria Margareta (1690–1691) →Family Tree Infant daughter of Emperor Leopold I37 and Empress Eleonora Magdelena.32 Her heart is buried in urn 34, and her viscera in urn 35, in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.

Grandson of Emperor Ferdinand III27:

  • 15 Unnamed (1686) →Family Tree Son of Johann Wilhelm of Pfalz-Neuberg and Archduchess Maria Anna Josepha.17

Main Hall

In front of the Children's Columbarium:

Proceeding along the north wall, east-to-west:

  • 21 Empress Maria Leopoldina (6 April 1632 – 7 August 1649) →Family Tree Second wife of Emperor Ferdinand III.27 Married at age 16, died in childbirth of Archduke Karl Joseph116 the next year.
  • 22 Empress Maria Anna (18 August 1606 – 13 May 1646) →Family Tree Born Infanta of Spain, first wife of Emperor Ferdinand III.27
  • 23 Archduchess Maria Amalia (5 April 1724 – 19 April 1730) →Family Tree Six-year old youngest daughter of Emperor Karl VI.40 Her viscera are buried in urn 45 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.

Proceeding along the south wall, east-to-west:

  • 26 Archduke Leopold Joseph (1682–1684) →Family Tree Son of Emperor Leopold I.37 His sarcophagus is normal sized although he was only two years old when he died.

Karl's Vault

The first part of the Karlsgruft was built in 1710 by Emperor Joseph I.35 In 1720 it was extended by Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt on the orders of Emperor Karl VI40 and shelters 8 containers:

Proceeding along the south wall, from left to right:

  • 37 Emperor Leopold I (9 June 1640 – 5 May 1705) →Family Tree Second son of Emperor Ferdinand III27 and father of Emperors Joseph I35 and Karl VI.40 He repelled an effort by the Muslims to conquer Europe at the Second Siege of Vienna. He built the Leopold's Wing of the Hofburg, used today as the offices of the president of Austria. He can be seen sculpted, kneeling prayer for the end of the plague epidemic, on the plague column (Pestsäule) in Vienna. Died at age 65 after a reign of 48 years. His three wives and 16 of his children are buried here. His heart is buried in urn 11 the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche and his viscera are in urn 41 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • 38 Archduchess Maria Elisabeth (1680–1741) →Family Tree Daughter of Emperor Leopold I.37 Unmarried, she was appointed governor of the Austrian Netherlands in her own right and when she died at age 69, was originally buried in Brussels but was transferred here 8 years later. Her heart is buried in urn 14 in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche and her viscera are in urn 51 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.


  • 40 Emperor Karl VI (1 October 1685 – 20 October 1740) →Family Tree Younger son of Emperor Leopold I.37 Raised in Spain in preparation to inherit the Spanish throne upon the death of his childless cousin, the War of the Spanish Succession ended when Karl unexpectedly inherited the Empire upon his brother Joseph's35 early death and no one wanted to allow the dominance that would come from empowering Karl with both realms. Moving to Vienna, he brought the Spanish Riding School with him and built the magnificent hall it uses today. Because he had no surviving male heirs,30 he negotiated the Pragmatic Sanction to assure that his daughter Maria Theresia56 would succeed him, going so far as to pre-bribe the nine Electors but, of course, once he died they ignored their promises but kept the money, resulting in the War of the Austrian Succession. He died after a reign of 29 years, at age 55 after catching a cold while hunting. His heart is buried in urn 13 the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche and his viscera are in urn 48 in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.

His tomb is one of the most remarkable, with a death's head at each corner wearing one of the distinctive crowns of his major realms (the Empire, Bohemia, Hungary, and Austria).

The empty plaza at the west third of this vault was used as the area for reception ceremonies when new bodies were brought in after the funeral ceremonies upstairs.

Returning along the north wall, from left to right:

  • 34 (Urn containing the heart of ) Empress Wilhelmina Amalia of Brunswick (21 April 1673 – 10 April 1742) →Family Tree Wife (1699) of Emperor Joseph I.35 The wing of the Hofburg in which she had living space during her widowhood is named after her, but she founded the Salesian Cloister in Vienna 1712 to educate young women and spent much of her time there. She died of edema at age 69. Her body lies dressed in a nun's habit entombed in a simple stone sarcophagus below the high altar in the Salesian Cloister in Vienna.

Maria Theresa's Vault

The three vaults of the Imperial Crypt held 44 bodies plus urns containing the hearts of two other persons when Empress Maria Theresa56 started construction of the Maria Theresien Gruft in 1754. It is behind the church above, with its dome rising into the monastery courtyard and contains the tombs of 16 persons:

In the entrance archway:

  • 42 Emperor Joseph II (Schönbrunn 13 March 1741 – Vienna 20 February 1790 →Family Tree Son of Empress Maria Theresa.56 A populist who became known as "the people's emperor," he initiated many reforms (including a prohibition on embalming and elaborate burials), many of which he repudiated in disillusionment shortly before his death. In keeping with his edict, his body is unembalmed and intact within a simple copper tomb. He died shortly before his 49th birthday after an official reign of 10 years. His equestrian statue in the Josefsplatz of the Hofburg palace is where Harry Lime's auto accident occurs in The Third Man. His two wives and two children are buried in this Vault.

In the small chamber immediately north of Emperor Joseph II42:

  • 41 Countess Karoline von Fuchs-Mollard (1 January 1681 – 27 April 1754) →Family Tree Long-time family retainer and governess to Empress Maria Theresia,56 her sisters23 39 and her children. The inscription of gratitude on the lid of her sarcopagus is signed by Empress Maria Theresa,56 who ordered her burial with the imperial family (although she had no direct blood or matrimonial connection to the Habsburgs) when she died at age 73.

In the center of the vault, from left to right:

  • 56 Empress Maria Theresa (13 May 1717 – 29 November 1780) →Family Tree Eldest surviving descendant of Emperor Karl VI,40→Family Tree her ascension was contested and officially the crown of the Empire went to her husband (1736) Emperor Franz I Stephen.55 Dying at age 63, her forty years' reign is thought of by the Austrians as the British think of Queen Victoria: the golden years of power, prestige and empire. A prominent statue of her enthroned and surrounded by her ministers is a landmark at the entrance to the Museumsplatz. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 55 Emperor Franz I Stephen (Lunéville 8 December 1708 – Innsbruck 18 August 1765) →Family Tree Duke of Lorraine and Grand Duke of Tuscany. Husband of Empress Maria Theresa,56 he died at age 56 after nominally being Emperor for 25 years. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.

This double tomb of Empress Maria Theresa and her husband, Francis I Stephen, sculpted by Balthasar Ferdinand Moll is of particular artistic merit and is probably the most glorious in terms of design.

In the small chamber immediately south of Emperor Joseph II42:

  • 43 Archduchess Maria Karolina (17 September 1748 – 17 September 1748) →Family Tree Still-born daughter of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa.

Along the south wall, young children of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa.56 that died from smallpox. From left to right:

  • 44 Archduke Karl Joseph Emanuel Johann Nepomuck Anton Prokop (1 February 1745 – 18 January 1761) →Family Tree Second son of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa. Died of small pox shortly before his 16th birthday. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 45 Archduchess Marie Johanna Gabriele Josephe Antonie (4 February 1750 – 23 December 1762 →Family Tree Eighth daughter of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa.56 Died of small pox at age 12. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 46 Archduchess Marie Josephe Gabriele Johanna Antonie Anna (19 March 1751 – 15 October 1767) →Family Tree Ninth daughter of Emperor Franz I55 and Empress Maria Theresa.56 Unhappy with the marriage arranged for her, she died of small pox the day before her wedding, at age 16.

At the southwest bend:

  • 47 Unnamed princess (1744) →Family Tree Daughter of Prince Charles of Lorraine and Archduchess Maria Anna39 (sister of Empress Maria Theresa56).

Along the west wall, mainly the family of Emperor Joseph II.42 From left to right:

  • 48 Archduchess Marie Elisabeth Amalie Antonie Josephe Gabriele Johanna Agathe (5 February 1737 – 7 June 1740) →Family Tree Three-years old, eldest daughter of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa.56 Her intestines are buried separately in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • 49 Empress Maria Josepha of Bavaria (30 March 1739 – 28 May 1767) →Family Tree Second wife (1765) of Emperor Joseph II.42 She was the daughter of the only non-Habsburg Emperor since 1438, Charles VII, Holy Roman Emperor and his wife, Empress Maria Amalia of Austria, a daughter of Emperor Joseph I.35 Especially because of the unusually potent form of small pox of which she died at age 28, her body was not embalmed but immediately placed intact into her coffin. Her husband of 2 years had not developed a regard for her, and did not attend her funeral.
  • 51 Archduchess Christina (22 November 1763 – 22 November 1763) →Family Tree Still-born second daughter of Emperor Joseph II42 and his first wife Archduchess Isabella.50 Her tomb rests beneath that of her mother.50
  • 52 Archduchess Maria Theresia (20 March 1762 – 23 January 1770) →Family Tree Eldest daughter of Emperor Joseph II42 and his first wife Archduchess Isabella.50 Died at almost 8 years of age.
  • 53 Archduchess Marie Caroline Ernestine Antonie Johanna Josephe (12 January 1740 – 25 January 1741) →Family Tree Third daughter of Emperor Franz I Stephen55 and Empress Maria Theresa.56 Died at age 1 year. Her intestines are buried separately in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.

Beside the entrance to Franz’s Vault on the north wall:

  • 54 Duchess Christina of Saxony-Teschen (16 May 1767 – 17 May 1767) →Family Tree Infant, only child of Duke Albert of Saxony-Teschen111 and Archduchess Maria Christina.112

Franz's Vault

In 1824 the four vaults of the Imperial Crypt held 78 bodies and urns containing the hearts of three other persons. In that year Emperor Franz II57 built the octagonal Franzensgruft, attaching it to the right wing of Maria Theresa’s Vault. It is in the Biedermeier style, as are the five tombs within it.

In the center:

In the corners, clockwise starting from the near left (south west) corner:

  • 61 Empress Caroline Augusta of Bavaria (Mannheim 8 February 1792 – Vienna 9 February 1873) →Family Tree Fourth wife (1816) of Emperor Franz II.57 Died the day after her 81st birthday, having survived her husband by 38 years and two reigns.

Until 1940, this vault also held the body of a grandson of Emperor Franz II,57 Franz Joseph Karl, Duke of Reichstadtx811 (1811–1832). →Family Tree Adolf Hitler ordered that the body be sent to France where it now rests in Les Invalides in Paris near the body of his father, Napoléon Bonaparte. His heart is still buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.

Through the doorway in the west wall to the left is the south part of the Tuscan Vault. In the east wall is the west entrance to the Crypt Chapel. The north wall opens into Ferdinand’s Vault.

Ferdinand's Vault

The Ferdinandsgruft was built in 1842, along with the Tuscan Vault, in conjunction with the reconstruction of the monastery above. Although the visitor sees an almost-empty room with only two sarcophagi, this vault actually contains one-fourth of the Imperial Crypt's entire population, walled-up into the corner piers.

Skip ahead to tombs: 64–72, 73–79, 80–87, 88–100

Main Hall

Within the southwest pier:

Nine tombs, mostly of youths:

  • 64 Archduke Alexander Leopold Johann Joseph, Palatine of Hungary (Poggio Imperiale 14 August 1772 – Laxenburg 12 July 1795) →Family Tree Fourth son of Emperor Leopold II113 and Empress Maria Ludovika.114 Died at 22. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 65 Archduchess Maria Amalia Josephe Johanna Katharina Theresia (Florence 15 October 1780 – Vienna 25 December 1798) →Family Tree Daughter of Emperor Leopold II113 and Empress Maria Ludovika.114 Died at 18. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 66 Archduchess Louise Elisabeth (Vienna 18 February 1790 – Vienna 24 June 1791) →Family Tree Infant first daughter of Emperor Franz II57 and Empress Maria Theresia.60 Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 67 Archduchess Maria Eleonore of Austria-Teschen (Groß-Seelowitz 19 November 1864 – Groß-Seelowitz 9 December 1864) →Family Tree Infant second daughter of Archduke Karl Ferdinand.121
  • 68 Archduke Franz Joseph of Austria-Teschen (Groß-Seelowitz 5 March 1855 – Groß-Seelowitz 13 March 1855) →Family Tree Infant first son of Archduke Karl Ferdinand.121 His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 69 Archduke Joseph Franz Leopold (Vienna 9 April 1799 – Laxenburg 30 June 1807) →Family Tree Second son of Emperor Franz II57 and Empress Maria Theresia.60 Died at 8. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 71 Archduke Johann Nepomuk Karl (Vienna 29 August 1805 – Vienna 19 February 1809) →Family Tree Fourth son of Emperor Franz II57 and Empress Maria Theresia.60 Died at 4. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 72 Archduke Robert Ferdinand Salvator (Salzburg 15 October 1885 – Salzburg 2 August 1895) →Family Tree Ten-years old, last of the 11 children of Grand Duke Ferdinand IV of Tuscany108 and Alicia Bourbon-Parma.

Within the southeast pier:

  • 73 Archduchess Maria Antonia (1858–1883) →Family Tree Daughter of Grand Duke Ferdinand IV of Tuscany.108 Died at 25.
  • 74 Archduchess Maria Anna (1835–1840) →Family Tree Daughter of Archduke Franz Karl135 and Sophie of Bavaria,137 sister of Emperor Franz Joseph142 Died at 5.
  • 75 Archduchess Maria Carolina (1821–1844) →Family Tree Daughter of Archduke Rainerx783 and Princess Elisabeth of Savoy. Died at 23.
  • 76 Archduke Ferdinand Salvator (1888–1891) →Family Tree Son of Archduke Karl Salvator90 and Maria Immakulata.89 Died at 3.
  • 77 Archduke Rainer Salvator (1880–1889) →Family Tree Son of Archduke Karl Salvator90 and Maria Immakulata.89 Died at 9.
  • 78 Archduchess Sophie Friederike (1855–1857) →Family Tree Daughter of Emperor Franz Joseph142 and Empress Elisabeth (Sisi)143 Died at 2.

Within the northwest pier:

Eight tombs, containing 9 bodies:

  • 81 Archduchess Stephanie Maria Isabelle (Preßburg 1 May 1886 – Ostend 29 August 1890) →Family Tree Fifth daughter of Archduke Friedrich of Teschen (second son of Archduke Karl Ferdinand121) and Princess Isabella von Croy-Dülmen. Died at 4.
  • 83 Archduchess Maria Caroline Luise Christine (10 September 1825 – 17 July 1915) →Family Tree Daughter of Archduke Karl.122 Wife (21 February 1852) of Archduke Ranier.110 Died at age 89.
  • 84b Unnamed (1802) →Family Tree Infant son of Maria Luisa.84a Both died during his birth and are buried in the same coffin.
  • 87 Archduchess Caroline Ludovika Leopoldine (Vienna 9 December 1795 – Schloß Hetzendorf 30 June 1799) →Family Tree Fourth daughter of Emperor Franz II57 and Maria Theresia.60 Died at 3. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.

Within the northeast pier:

Thirteen tombs, principally members of the Tuscan line:

  • 88 Archduke Albrecht Salvator Marie Joseph Ferdinand Karl Anton Johannes Xaver Aloys Rainer Klemens Roman (Alt-Bunzlau 22 November 1871 – Bolzano 27 February 1896) →Family Tree Son of Archduke Karl Salvator90 and Maria Immakulata.89 Died at 24.
  • 89 Archduchess Maria Immakulata of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (Naples 14 April 1844 – Vienna 18 February 1899) →Family Tree Wife of Archduke Karl Salvator.90 Died at age 54.
  • 90 Archduke Karl Salvator Giuseppe Giovanni Battista Filippo Jacopo Gennaro Lodovico Gonzaga Raniero (Florence 30 April 1839 – Vienna 18 January 1892) →Family Tree Son of Grand Duke Leopold II of Tuscany.109 Among his sons was Franz Salvator, who married Marie Valerie, a daughter of Emperor Franz Joseph.142 Died at 52.
  • 91 (Urn containing the cremated remains of) Archduke Leopold Maria Alphons Blanka Karl Anton Beatrix Michael Joseph Peter Ignatz (Agram 30 January 1897 – Mansfield, Connecticut 14 March 1958) →Family Tree Second son of Archduke Leopold Salvator.132 Naturalized in the USA as Leopold Lorraine in 1953. Died at 61. Married morganatically.
  • 92 Archduchess Maria Antonia Immakulata Josepha Ferdinanda Theresia Leopoldine Franziska Karoline Isabella Januaria Luise Christine Appolonie (Vienna 18 April 1874 – Arco 14 January 1891) →Family Tree Daughter of Archduke Karl Salvator90 and Maria Immakulata.89
  • 93 Archduke Ernst Karl Felix Maria Rainer Gottfried Cyriak (Milan 8 August 1824 – Arco 4 April 1899) →Family Tree Son of Archduke Rainerx783 and Princess Elisabeth of Savoy. Married morganatically and his children bore the surname von Wallburg.
  • 94 Archduchess Adelgunde of Bavaria (1823–1914) →Family Tree Wife of Archduke Franz V of Austria-Este, Duke of Modena.101 Daughter of Ludwig I of Bavaria and sister of Hildegard of Bavaria.129
  • 95 Archduchess Maria Karoline Leopoldine Franziska Theresia Josepha Medarde (Vienna 8 June 1794 – Vienna 16 March 1795) →Family Tree Daughter of Emperor Franz II57 and Maria Theresia.60 Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 96 Archduchess Amalia Therese (Vienna 6 April 1807 – 7 April 1807) →Family Tree One-day old daughter of Emperor Franz II57 and Maria Theresia.60
  • 97 Archduchess Henriette Maria Immakulata Adelgunde Josepha Ferdinande Theresia Leopoldine Franziska Karoline Isabella Januaria Luise Christine Eleonore (Vienna 20 February 1884 – Traunkirchen 13 August 1886) →Family Tree Daughter of Archduke Karl Salvator90 and Maria Immakulata.89
  • 98 Archduke Ludwig Salvator Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Battista Dominicus Raineri Ferdinando Carl Zenobius Antonin (Florence 4 August 1847 – Schloß Brandeis 12 October 1915) Memorial website (in German).
  • 99 Infanta Maria Theresia of Portugal (Kleinheubach 24 August 1855 – Vienna 12 February 1944) →Family Tree At age 18 she became the third wife (1873) of the twice-widowed Archduke Karl Ludwig138 who was 22 years older, and she survived him by 48 years. For the seven years after the death of Crown Prince Rudolf144 her husband was the heir-apparent and she undertook many of the representional duties neglected by the ever-travelling Empress Elisabeth ("Sissi")143 until her married stepson Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Estex863 became the heir-apparent. During World War I she worked as a nurse, and accompanied the last emperor, Karl Ix887 into exile on Madeira but returned to spend her old age in Vienna.
  • 100 Archduke Joseph Ferdinand Salvator Maria Franz Leopold Anton Albert Johann Baptist Karl Ludwig Rupert Maria Auxilatrix (Salzburg 24 May 1872 – Vienna 25 August 1942) →Family Tree Second son of Archduke Ferdinand IV of Tuscany.108 Like his cousin Archduke Leopold Salvator132 he had an interest in ballooning, and once flew his balloon from Linz to Dieppe in only 16 hours. His interest in things aeronautical had brought him into contact with the future head of the German air force, Hermann Göring, who later used his influence to free the Archduke from the German concentration camp at Dachau in 1938 after only 80 days there. Had issue from two morganatic marriages.

The Tuscan Vault

The Toscanagruft was built in 1842, along with Ferdinand’s Vault. At that time there were 85 bodies plus the heart urns of three other persons in the five vaults of the crypt.

The Tuscan Vault once held many more than the present 14 tombs, but most were moved to the New Vault or enclosed within the piers of Ferdinand’s Vault during the major rearrangement of 1960. The 5-meter wide vault is very large, being 21 meters long, and extends along the entire western lengths of both Ferdinand's Vault and Franz’s Vault, ending only when it meets the outside wall of the west transept of Maria Theresia's Vault.

This vault takes its name from the many descendants of the younger sons of Emperor Leopold II,113 as Grand Duke of Tuscany, who are entombed here.

Note: the arrangement of tombs listed below was accurate before the 2003 renovation, but they have been rearranged since then.

In the archway from Ferdinand’s Vault, from left to right:

  • 111 Duke Albert of Saxony-Teschen (11 July 1738 – 10 February 1822) →Family Tree Husband of Archduchess Maria Christina.112 The Albertina museum, in his former palace, is named for him because his collection of paintings formed the nucleus of the museum. After the early death of their only child,54 the couple became the adoptive parents of Archduke Karl,122 the victor of Aspern. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 112 Archduchess Maria Christina Johanna Josephe Antonie ("Mimi") (3 May 1742 – 24 June 1798) →Family Tree Favorite daughter of Empress Maria Theresia.56 Her mother stalled arranged marriages until after the death of her father, Emperor Franz I Stephen,55 so that Maria Christina could marry for love instead of reasons of state—the only child allowed to do so. She chose Duke Albert of Teschen.111 The famous and moving monument he erected to her memory is in the Augustinerkirche. She died of Typhus at age 56. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 114 Empress Maria Ludovika (24 November 1745 – 15 May 1792) →Family Tree Originally contracted to marry Empress Maria Theresia's56 second son, Archduke Karl Joseph,44 his early death diverted her instead to the third son, who later became Emperor Leopold II.113 In the course of 21 years, she bore her not-always-faithful husband 16 children, among them Emperor Franz II,57 and Archduke Karl122 the victor of Aspern. Grieving for her husband, she outlived him by only two months leaving many small children. Her heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.

Behind them, from left to right:

To the right of the archway, along the north wall, from left to right:

  • 108 Archduke Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany Salvatore Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Battista Francesco Lodovico Gonzaga Raffaele Ranerio Gennaro (1835–1908) →Family Tree Son of Archduke Leopold II,109 Grand Duke of Tuscany. Married (1856) Anne of Saxony (Dresden 4 January 1836 – Naples 10 February 1859), then (1868) Alicia of Bourbon-Parma (Parma 27 December 1849 – Schwertberg 16 January 1935). Lost his throne, 9 months after his father109 had abdicated it to him, when Tuscany was annexed to Italy in 1860.
  • 110 Archduke Papyrus Museum of the Austrian National Library.

To the left of the archway, along the west wall, from left to right:

  • 104 Archduke Ludwig Joseph (13 December 1784 – 21 December 1864) →Family Tree Eleventh son of Emperor Leopold II.113 Promoter of industrialization in Austria after studying its success in England. Member of the Council of State that exercised power during the reign of the feeble-minded Emperor Ferdinand62 of Austria. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.

In front of them, along the east wall:

The New Vault

The Neue Gruft was built between 1960 and 1962 under the monastery grounds as a 280 square meter enlargement to eliminate the overcrowded jumble of 140 bodies (plus cremation and heart urns of four other persons) in the other nine vaults, and to provide a climate-controlled environment to protect the metal sarcophagi from further deterioration. Its stark concrete walls evoke the solemnity of death. The New Vault is entered from Ferdinand’s Vault, and exits into the back of Franz Joseph’s Vault. It contains 26 sarcophagi:

Skip ahead to tombs: 115–119, 120–126, 127, 128–134, 135–141

West Wall

To the left of the entrance, proceeding along the west wall from south to north, the "Bishops Row":

  • 116 Archduke Karl Joseph (7 August 1649 – 27 January 1664) →Family Tree Son of Emperor Ferdinand III27 and Empress Maria Leopoldina,21 who died during his birth. Bishop of Olomouc and Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights at age 13 as heir to his uncle, Archduke Leopold Wilhelm.115 The art collection he inherited from Archduke Leopold Wilhelm115 became the foundation of the Kunsthistorisches Museum. Died at age 15. His intestines are buried separately in the Ducal Crypt of the Stephansdom.
  • Urn containing heart of Archbishop Karl Joseph of Lorraine,117 placed atop his sarcophagus.
  • 119 Archduke Rudolph (8 January 1788 – 24 July 1831) →Family Tree Youngest son of Emperor Leopold II.113 Cardinal and Archbishop of Olomouc. A piano pupil of Ludwig van Beethoven, Beethoven dedicated 14 compositions to him, including the Archduke Trio and his great Missa Solemnis. He, in turn, dedicated one of his own compositions to Beethoven.

South Wall

Along the south wall:

North Wall

Proceeding along the north wall, from west to east, the first ledge contains the immediate family of Archduke Karl122 the victor of Aspern:


  • 122 Archduke Karl "the victor of Aspern" (1771–1847) →Family Tree Duke of Teschen, third son of Emperor Leopold II.113 He was adopted by the childless Albert of Saxony-Teschen111 and Archduchess Maria Christina.112 A statue of him on horseback, holding the regimental colors aloft to rally his troops against Napoleon, stands in the Heldenplatz in Vienna. His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • Urn with heart and entrails of Henriette of Nassau-Weilburg.123

On its own pedestal, directly across from the tomb of Empress Maria Louise127:

  • 126 Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico (1832–1867) →Family Tree Second son of Archduke Franz Karl135 and brother of Emperor Franz Joseph.142 Created Emperor of Mexico by France and the Mexican Conservative rival Government, he was overthrown and executed by forces of the warring Mexican Liberals, who would go on to found the Republic.

The next ledge along the north wall, from left to right, mostly contains the family of Archduke Albrecht128 a great military commander of the following generation:

  • 128 Archduke Albrecht (1817–1895) →Family Tree Eldest son of Archduke Karl.122 Because of a distinguished military career, an equestrian statue of him was erected on the ramp outside of his former home, the Albertina in Vienna.
  • 131 Archduke Karl Albert of Austria-Teschen (1847–1848) →Family Tree Infant son of Archduke Albrecht.128
  • 132 Archduke Leopold Salvator Maria Joseph Ferdinand Franz von Assisi Karl Anton von Padua Johann Baptist Januarius Aloys Gonzaga Ranier Wenzel Gallus (Alt-Bunzlau, Bohemia 15 October 1863 – Vienna 4 September 1931) →Family Tree Eldest son of Archduke Karl Salvator.90 During a brilliant military career, he reorganized and modernized the Austrian artillery, becoming Inspector General in 1908. He flew hot air balloons and work on the development of airships. He grew rich from his inventions such as all-wheel drive and half-track trucks for the army. Married (1889) Blanca Infanta of Spain (Graz 7 Sep 1868-Viareggio 25 Oct 1949).
  • 133 Archduke Rainer Karl Leopold Blanka Anton Margarita Beatrix Maria Peter Joseph Raphael Michael Ignatius Stephan (Zagreb 21 November 1895 – Vienna 25 May 1930) →Family Tree First son of Archduke Leopold Salvator.132 Unmarried.
  • 134 Archduchess Margarete Karoline of Saxony (24 May 1840 – 15 September 1858) →Family Tree First wife (1856) of her mother's nephew, Archduke Karl Ludwig.138 The marriage had not yet produced any children when she fell ill of typhus while on holiday in Monza and died at age 18. Her heart is buried in the Hofkapelle in Innsbruck.

East Wall

Proceeding along the east wall, from north to south, the direct ancestors of the last emperors:

  • 135 Archduke Franz Karl (1802–1878) →Family Tree Third son of Emperor Franz II.57 When his elder brother Emperor Ferdinand62 abdicated in 1848, he stood aside so that his son, Emperor Franz Joseph,142 could succeed to the throne instead. Great grandfather of the last reigning emperor, Emperor Karl I.x887 His heart is buried in the Herzgruft in the Augustinerkirche.
  • 137 Archduchess Sophie (1805–1872) →Family Tree Wife (1824) of Archduke Franz Karl.135 Friendly with Napoleon's sonx811 in her youth. She tried to arrange a marriage between her son Emperor Franz Joseph142 and the eldest daughter of her sister, but he chose the youngest daughter "Sissi"143 instead.
  • 138 Archduke Karl Ludwig (1833–1896) →Family Tree Third son of Archduke Franz Karl.135 Brother of Emperor Franz Joseph,142 father of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Estex863 and Otto140 and grandfather of Emperor Karl I.x887 After the death of Crown Prince Rudolf144 he was the heir-apparent.
  • 140 Archduke Otto "der Schöne" (the gorgeous) (1865–1906) →Family Tree Second son of Archduke Karl Ludwig.138 Father of Emperor Karl I.x887 Usually remembered for the widely-circulated story that he had been spotted in a hallway at the Hotel Sacher about to enter a lady's room, wearing only a sword.
  • 141 Archduchess Maria Josepha of Saxony (31 May 1867 – 28 May 1944) →Family Tree Wife (1886) of Archduke Otto.140 She strove to keep her children away from the influence of her notorious husband, and her ability to avoid excessive displays of grief when he died was much noted. She would probably wish her tomb was not exactly where it now is. She accompanied the last reigning emperor, Karl Ix887 into exile, and spent the remainder of her life with his family after his death.

Franz Joseph's Vault

By 1908 the seven vaults of the crypt already held 129 bodies, plus the heart urns of another 3 persons. In that year the Franz Josephs Gruft was built, along with the adjacent Chapel, as part of the celebrations of Emperor Franz Josef's142 60 years on the throne. The vault is usually entered from the north wall in the rear, through the southeast door of the New Vault.

From the foot of the tombs, left to right:


  • 143 Empress Elisabeth of Bavaria ("Sisi") (1837–1898) →Family Tree Wife of Emperor Franz Joseph.142

Turning around from the foot of the tombs, the doorway on the south wall of this vault leads into the Crypt Chapel.

The Crypt Chapel

The Gruftkapelle was built, along with Franz Joseph’s Vault, in 1908. It is usually entered from the south doorway of Franz Joseph's Vault.

As one enters, to the right extending from the west wall:

  • 149 Archduchess Yolande (1923 – ), wife (1950) of Archduke Carl Ludwig148, will occupy this space after she dies.
  • 148 Archduke Carl Ludwig (10 March 1918 – 11 December 2007, son of Emperor Karl Ix887 of Austria.
  • 147 Empress Switzerland.

Ahead, to the right of the altar along the south wall:

  • 150 Archduke Otto (1912–2011)) →Family Tree, eldest son of Emperor Karl I of Austriax887 and claimant to the thrones (renounced in 1961) and later (1979) elected by German voters to a seat in the European Parliament, where after many reelections he served longer than any other member.

to the left of the altar,

  • 151 Archduchess Regina (1925–2010), wife of Archduke Otto150.

To the left, in front of the east wall:

  • A statue of the Madonna, presented by Hungarian ladies in 1899 as a memorial to Empress Elisabeth of Bavaria.143

In the far-right (southeast) corner:

The doorway to the right enters the east side of Franz’s Vault; the west doorway, to the left, is an exit stairway.

Selected Other Habsburgs

Not all of the significant Habsburgs are entombed here. Those referred to in this article but resting elsewhere are:

  • his descendant successors as Kings of Spain, in the crypt of El Escorial, near Madrid.
  • x540 Archduke Seckau.
  • his descendants, the Inner Austria line, in the Stiftsbasilika in Seckau.

After the Imperial Crypt opened in 1632:

  • x578 Emperor Graz.
  • his descendants, the Austrian Line, are the major group entombed in this Imperial Crypt.
  • x779 Archduke Modena.
  • x783 Archduke Rainer (30 September 1783 – 16 January 1853) →Family Tree Son of Emperor Leopold II.113 Buried in the Maria Himmelfahrtskirche in Bolzano (Italy).
  • x863 Archduke Artstetten.
  • x868 Duchess Artstetten.

See also

References

  • Official Website (in German)
  • Capuchin Monastery in Vienna (in German)

Coordinates: 48°12′20″N 16°22′11″E / 48.20556°N 16.36972°E / 48.20556; 16.36972de:Kapuzinergruft nl:Kapuzinergruft

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