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Kraft Television Theatre

Kraft Television Theatre
Ed Begley, Everett Sloane and Richard Kiley in Rod Serling's Patterns on Kraft Television Theatre (1955)
Also known as Kraft Mystery Theatre
Genre Anthology
Narrated by Ed Herlihy (1947-55)
Charles Stark (1955)
Theme music composer Norman Cloutier
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 11
No. of episodes 525
Production
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 48–52 minutes
Production company(s) J. Walter Thompson Agency
Talent Associates
Release
Original channel NBC
Picture format Black-and-white
Audio format Monaural
Original release May 7, 1947 (1947-05-07) – October 1, 1958 (1958-10-01)

Kraft Television Theatre is an American drama/anthology television series that began May 7, 1947 on NBC, airing at 7:30pm on Wednesday evenings until December of that year. In January 1948, it moved to 9pm on Wednesdays, continuing in that timeslot until 1958. Initially produced by the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency, the live hour-long series offered television plays with new stories and new characters each week,[1] in addition to adaptations of such classics as A Christmas Carol and Alice in Wonderland.

Beginning October 1953, ABC added a separate series (also titled Kraft Television Theatre), created to promote Kraft's new Cheez Whiz product. This series ran for sixteen months, telecast on Thursday evenings at 9:30pm, until January 1955.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Episode status 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Background

A prestige show for NBC, it launched the careers of more than a few actors, directors and playwrights, including future Emmy-winning and Academy Award-nominated actress Hope Lange.[2]

Actors on the series included Rod Steiger, Joan Tompkins (her first television role), and Joanne Woodward. Announcers for the show were Ed Herlihy (1947–1955) and Charles Stark (1955).[3] In 1958, young performers Martin Huston and Zina Bethune appeared in "This Property Is Condemned", based on a Tennessee Williams play, the last show of Kraft Television Theatre.

Directors for the series included Fielder Cook, and John Boulting, and the many contributing writers included Rod Serling and JP Miller. Serling won an Emmy for scripting Patterns (January 12, 1955), the best remembered episode of the series. The drama had such an impact that it made television history by staging a second live encore performance three weeks later and was developed as a feature film, also titled Patterns.

In April 1958, Kraft sold the rights to David Susskind's Talent Associates, which revamped the series as Kraft Mystery Theatre. Under that title, it continued until September 1958. However, this eventually evolved into the 1963 filmed series Kraft Suspense Theatre, which concentrated exclusively on original dramas written for television, not on adaptations.

Between 1947 and 1958, the Kraft Television Theatre presented more than 650 comedies and dramas.[1] The series finished #14 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1950-1951 season, #23 for 1951-1952 and #21 for 1953-1954.[4]

Episode status

Excerpts from several 1947 episodes are part of a reel of 1947 television clips held by the Library of Congress.[5] In addition, the Library of Congress holds a large number of complete episodes, including five from 1948.[6] The American Heritage Center has a number of scripts from various episodes for the years 1947, 1948, and 1949 in the Edmund C. Rice papers. These scripts, though authored by various people, were edited by Rice.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b Griffith, Benjamin (2002). "Kraft Television Theatre". St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture (Thomas Gale). Retrieved 2008-07-19. 
  2. ^ Tom Vallance (2003-12-23). "Hope Lange". The Independent. Retrieved 2008-10-30. 
  3. ^ "Kraft Television Theatre". TV.com. 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-22. 
  4. ^ http://www.classictvhits.com/tvratings/index.htm
  5. ^ "Early television excerpts and clips". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ Sources:
    • "Kraft television theatre: The royal family". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
    • "Kraft television theatre: Captain Applejack". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
    • "Kraft television theatre: No way out". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
    • "Kraft television theatre: The silver cord". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
    • "Kraft television theatre: She stoops to conquer". The Library of Congress Online Catalog. The Library of Congress. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  7. ^ Rice, Edmund C. "Edmund C. Rice 'Kraft Television Theatre' scripts, 1947-1954". University of Wyoming. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 

External links

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