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Mineral spring

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Title: Mineral spring  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Vučkovec, Mineral water, Destination spa, Thermopylae, Bottled water
Collection: Bathing, Drinking Water, Geomorphology, Mineral Water, Natural Environment Based Therapies, Spa Waters, Springs (Hydrology), Water Chemistry
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Mineral spring

The Mineral Spring, etching by Wenceslas Hollar (1607-1677). The unidentified central European spring features a sunken stone basin and ornamental retaining wall.
A chalybeate (iron-laden) mineral spring at Breznik, Bulgaria.
Tap tapan spring in Azarshahr, Iran

Mineral springs are naturally occurring springs that produce water containing minerals, or other dissolved substances, that alter its taste or give it a purported therapeutic value. Salts, sulfur compounds, and gases are among the substances that can be dissolved in the spring water during its passage underground.

Mineral water obtained from mineral springs has long been an important commercial proposition.

Mineral spas are resorts that have developed around mineral springs, where (often wealthy) patrons would repair to “take the waters” — meaning that they would drink (see hydrotherapy and water cure) or bathe in (see balneotherapy) the mineral water.

Historical mineral springs were often outfitted with elaborate stone-works — including artificial pools, retaining walls, colonnades and roofs — sometimes in the form of fanciful "Greek temples", gazebos or pagodas. Others were entirely enclosed within spring houses.

Types

For many centuries, in Europe, North America and elsewhere, commercial proponents of mineral springs classified them according to the chemical composition of the water produced and according to the medicinal benefits supposedly accruing from each:

Deposits

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