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New universities

The term new universities has been used informally to refer to several different waves of new universities created or renamed as such in the United Kingdom.[1] Currently, the term is synonymous with post-1992 universities and sometimes modern universities, referring to any of the former polytechnics, central institutions or colleges of higher education that were given university status by John Major's government in 1992 (through the Further and Higher Education Act 1992) – as well as colleges that have been granted university status since then. Though referred to as new or modern, some were founded without university status as Polytechnics in the early to mid 19th century, an example of which is Royal London Polytechnic Institution which was established in 1838.

In the past the term was used to describe the then-new civic universities as early as 1928, such as Bristol University and the other red brick universities.[2] It later came to be used to refer to any of the universities founded in the 1960s after the Robbins Report on higher education. These institutions are now known as plate glass universities.

Contents

  • Post-1992 universities that trace their roots to former polytechnics 1
  • Post-1992 universities that are not former polytechnics 2
  • Post-1992 universities that trace their roots to former Central Institutions 3
  • References 4
  • See also 5

Post-1992 universities that trace their roots to former polytechnics

In addition, the New University of Ulster absorbed Ulster Polytechnic (in Jordanstown) in 1984, the university re-branded twice and is a plate glass university called Ulster University.

Post-1992 universities that are not former polytechnics

Post-1992 universities that trace their roots to former Central Institutions

All the categories of university award academic degrees, having received university status when the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 came into effect or in the years thereafter, although some of the newest universities may not have the power to award research degrees – the UK Government having separated research degrees from university title criteria.

References

  1. ^ What is a University in the UK
  2. ^ Herklots, H, 1928, The New Universities – an external examination, Ernest Benn, London
  3. ^ a b "History of the University of South Wales – University of South Wales". southwales.ac.uk. 
  4. ^ "History – University of West London". uwl.ac.uk. 
  5. ^ http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/alumni/Pages/Our-History.aspx

See also

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