World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Next (bicycle company)

Article Id: WHEBN0029345399
Reproduction Date:

Title: Next (bicycle company)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Dynacraft BSC, Gormully & Jeffery, Giro (company), Ibis (bicycles), Pocket Bicycles
Collection: Cycle Manufacturers of the United States, Road Cycles
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Next (bicycle company)

Next Bicycles headbadge

Next is an American bicycle brand distributed by Dynacraft BSC, Kent International Inc and Bridgeway International bicycle companies. Next bikes are produced in China and are sold in the American retail stores Wal-Mart.

Contents

  • Models 1
  • Issues 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Models[1]

Next offers kids, BMX, and mountain bikes.

18"

  • Misty - girls 6–9 years old
  • Surge - for boys 6–9 years old

20"

Next Slumber Party girls bike
  • Slumber Party - girls 8 years old and up
  • Turbo - boys 8 years old and up
  • Pretty in Pink -girls 8 years old and up
  • Wipe Out - boys 8 years old and up

24"

  • Power Climber - full suspension MTB for young adults

26"

  • Amplifier - adult Comfort Bike
  • Avalon - adult Bike
  • La Jolla - Cruiser
  • Parowan - Mountain Bike
  • Power Climber - adult full suspension MTB
NEXT Power X MTB
  • Power X - full suspension MTB for adults

Issues

In 2002 132,000 Next Ultra Shock mountain bicycles with "Ballistic 105" front suspension forks were recalled in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). There were 20 reports of the suspension forks breaking on the Next Ultra Shock bicycles, resulting in 19 riders suffering injuries that include abrasions, concussions and chipped teeth. By Us International Co. Ltd. manufactured the forks on these bicycles. These forks can break apart, causing riders to lose control, fall and suffer serious injury. The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) which previously announced the recall of about 103,000 of these forks sold on bicycles manufactured by Brunswick Corp. There have been 20 reports of the suspension forks breaking on the Next Ultra Shock bicycles, resulting in 19 riders suffering injuries that include abrasions, concussions and chipped teeth. The recall includes only on blue Next Ultra Shock bicycles, with model numbers 8524-14 and 8526-20 manufactured between April 1999 and November 9, 1999. Wal-Mart stores nationwide sold these mountain bikes from May 1999 through December 2000.[2]

During 2003, Dynacraft voluntarily recalled about 52,900 BMX bicycles whose stems could loosen during use, causing riders to lose control and fall. Dynacraft received 35 reports of stems loosening on these bicycles, resulting in one report of an injury (a broken finger). The recall includes two models of 20-inch BMX bicycles. The Next Voltage-model bicycles are metallic green, have model number 8535-99 and were manufactured between March 2002 and June 2002. The Vertical Street Blade-model bicycles are dark blue and chrome colored, have model number 8527-99 and were manufactured between March 2002 and April 2002. Wal-Mart stores sold the Next Voltage-model bicycles nationwide, including Puerto Rico, from May 2002 through November 2002. Pamida stores sold the Vertical Street Blade-model bicycles nationwide from April 2002 through April 2003.

References

  1. ^ http://next-bike.com/models.php
  2. ^ http://www.consumeraffairs.com/recalls/next_ultra.html

http://www.kentbicycles.com/

External links

  • Official website
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.