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Nikāya

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Title: Nikāya  
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Subject: Pāli Canon, Theravada, Early Buddhism, Glossary of Buddhism, Āgama (Buddhism)
Collection: Buddhist Terminology, Pāli Canon, Theravada, Tripiṭaka
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Nikāya

Nikāya is a Pāḷi word meaning "volume." It is used like the Sanskrit word āgama "basket"[1] to mean "collection," "assemblage," "class" or "group" in both Pāḷi and Sanskrit.[2] It is most commonly used in reference to the Buddhist texts of the Sutta Piṭaka but can also refer to the monastic divisions of Theravāda Buddhism.

In addition, the term Nikāya is sometimes used in contemporary scholarship to refer to early Buddhist schools.

Contents

  • Text collections 1
  • Monastic divisions 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • Bibliography 5

Text collections

In the Pāli Canon, particularly, the "Discourse Basket" or Sutta Piṭaka, the meaning of nikāya is roughly equivalent to the English collection and is used to describe groupings of discourses according to theme, length, or other categories. For example, the Sutta Piṭaka is broken up into five nikāyas:

In the other early Buddhist schools the alternate term āgama was used instead of nikāya to describe their Sutra Piṭakas. Thus the non-Mahāyāna portion of the Sanskrit-language Sutra Piṭaka is referred to as "the Āgamas" by Mahāyāna Buddhists. The Āgamas survive for the most part only in Classical Tibetan and Chinese translation. They correspond closely with the Pāḷi nikāyas.

Monastic divisions

Among the Theravāda nations of Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka, nikāya is also used as the term for a monastic division or lineage; these groupings are also sometimes called "monastic fraternities" or "frateries". Nikāyas may emerge among monastic groupings as a result of royal or government patronage (such as the Dhammayuttika Nikāya of Thailand, due to the national origin of their ordination lineage (the Siam Nikāya of Sri Lanka), because of differences in the interpretation of the monastic code, or due to other factors (such as the Amarapura Nikāya in Sri Lanka, which emerged as a reaction to caste restrictions within the Siam Nikāya). These divisions do not rise to the level of forming separate sects within the Theravāda tradition, because they do not typically follow different doctrines or monastic codes, nor do these divisions extend to the laity.

In

  • Rhys Davids, T.W. & William Stede (eds.) (1921-5). The Pali Text Society’s Pali–English Dictionary. Chipstead: Pali Text Society. A general on-line search engine for the PED is available at http://dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries/pali/.

Bibliography

  1. ^ the http://departments.colgate.edu/greatreligions/pages/buddhanet/theravada/nipata.txt
  2. ^ Rhys Davids & Stede (1921-25), p. 352, entry for "Nikāya" at http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.2:1:6.pali (retrieved 2007-11-06).
  3. ^

Notes

See also

. Konbaung Dynasty, which was founded in the 1800s during the Thudhamma Nikaya The largest of these is the [3]

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