World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Northern Spy

Article Id: WHEBN0004349999
Reproduction Date:

Title: Northern Spy  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: McIntosh (apple), Apple, Zs (band), Disease resistance in fruit and vegetables, Chelmsford Wonder
Collection: Apple Cultivars
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Northern Spy

Malus 'Northern Spy'
Freshly picked Northern Spy apples, Canada
Cultivar 'Northern Spy'
Origin Rochester, New York, 1840s[1]

The Northern Spy apple (Malus ‘Northern Spy’), sometimes known as "Northern Spie" or "Northern Pie Apple" is a variety of apple native to the Northern East Coast of the United States and parts of Michigan and Ontario. It is popular in upstate New York.

Skin color is a green ground, flushed with red stripes where not shaded, and it produces fairly late in the season (late October and beyond). The white flesh is juicy, crisp and mildly sweet with a rich, aromatic subacid flavor, noted for high vitamin C content. Its characteristic flavor is more tart than most popular varieties, and its flesh is harder/crunchier than most, with a thin skin.

It is commonly used for desserts and pies, but is also used for juices and cider. Further, the Northern Spy is also an excellent apple for storage, as it tends to last longer due to late maturation.

The Northern Spy apple tree is known for taking as much as a decade to bear fruit unless grafted to a non-standard rootstock, while the native Spy root makes an excellent stock for grafting other varieties to a standard size tree. It was discovered around 1800 in East Bloomfield, New York, south of Rochester, New York, as surviving sprouts of a seedling that had died and was cultivated with stock brought in from Connecticut. The Wagener apple is believed to be one of its forebears. It fell somewhat out of favor due to its dull coloration, irregular shape, tendency of the thin skin to allow bruising, and lack of disease resistance, specifically subject to bitter pit and blossom fireblight, but resistant to woolly aphid and somewhat to scab. It is not widely available at retail outside its growing regions but still serves as an important processing apple in those areas.

A Northern Spy apple tree figures in the poem "Conrad Siever" in Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon River Anthology, and in the poetry of Chase Twichell, whose first book "Northern Spy" was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press in 1981.

References

  1. ^ http://www.orangepippin.com/apples/northern-spy

External links

  • Apple Use
  • USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.