World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Osulf, Earl of Bamburgh

Article Id: WHEBN0023271589
Reproduction Date:

Title: Osulf, Earl of Bamburgh  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Harrying of the North, Earl of Northumbria, Copsi, Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Osulf, Earl of Bamburgh

Osulf or Oswulf (died 1067) was the son of Eadulf III, Earl of Bamburgh (killed 1041), and grandson of Uchtred the Bold, Earl of Northumbria (killed 1016). Osulf’s family ruled as "High-Reeves" or ealdormen of Bamburgh from 954 until 1041, when Siward the Stout killed Eadulf and reunited Northumbria under one ruler.

In 1065, Morcar succeeded Tostig as Earl of all Northumbria, and he appointed Osulf to rule the portion north of the River Tyne. However, because of Morcar’s resistance to the Norman invasion of England by William the Conqueror in 1066, he was deposed and imprisoned. William then appointed Copsi (sometimes Copsig), Tostig’s former deputy, as Morcar's replacement.

In February 1067, Copsi came north and forced Osulf to seek shelter in the hills. Osulf began to gather an army. Because Copsi was seen as an invader and a tax-gatherer for William, he was deeply unpopular amongst the Northumbrians north and south of the Tees, and Osulf had no trouble in gathering recruits. On March 12 he surprised Copsi and his men at a banquet at Newburn-upon-Tyne. Copsi fled to a nearby church, but this was set on fire, forcing Copsi out. Osulf then had Copsi's head cut off.

Osulf appears to have seized control of the earldom of Bamburgh, and was not threatened by any expeditions to remove him. However in the autumn of 1067, Osulf, who appears to have been carrying out his duties as earl, intercepted an outlaw and was run through by the man’s spear.

He was succeeded as earl by his cousin, Cospatric, who purchased the earldom from King William.

Sources

  • Aird, William M., "Osulf , earl of Bamburgh (d. 1067)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 30 Dec 2008
  • Kapelle, William E., The Norman Conquest of the North, University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
  • Stenton, Sir Frank M. Anglo-Saxon England Third Edition. Oxford University Press, 1971.
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Morcar
As Earl of Northumbria
Earl of Bamburgh
Opposed by:
Copsi

1065–1067
Succeeded by
Cospatric
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.