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Paiwan people

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Title: Paiwan people  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Taiwanese aborigines, Japanese invasion of Taiwan (1874), History of Taiwan, Paiwan language, Mudan Incident (1871)
Collection: Ethnic Groups in Taiwan, Headhunting, Taiwanese Aborigines
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Paiwan people

Paiwan
Total population
96,334 (2014)
Regions with significant populations
Taiwan
Languages
Mandarin, Paiwan
Religion
Animism, Christianity
Related ethnic groups
Malayo-Polynesians, Taiwanese Aborigines

The Paiwan (Chinese: 排灣; pinyin: Páiwān) are an aboriginal tribe of Taiwan. They speak the Paiwan language. In 2014, the Paiwan numbered 96,334. This was approximately 17.8% of Taiwan's total indigenous population, making them the second-largest tribal group.[1][2]

The unique ceremonies in Paiwan are Masaru and Maleveq. The Masaru is a ceremony that celebrates the harvest of rice, whereas the Maleveq commemorates their ancestors or gods.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Customs 2
  • Religion 3
  • Shamanism 4
  • Christianity 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7

History

A Paiwan family house in Formosan Aboriginal Culture Village.

One of the most important figures in Paiwan history was supreme chief Toketok (also Tauketok; 卓其督/卓杞篤; ca. 1817 - 1874), who united 18 tribes of Paiwan under his rule, and in 1867 concluded a formal agreement with Chinese and Western leaders to ensure the safety of foreign ships landing on their coastal territories in return for amnesty for Paiwan tribesmen who had killed the crew of the barque Rover in March 1867 (see Rover incident).[3]

In the past the Paiwan had a fearsome reputation as head-hunters. When Paiwan warriors returned home from a headhunting foray, "the women would gather together in front of the courtyard to welcome their heroes and would sing songs of triumph. The heads of their enemies were then hung on stone pillars in front of which were displayed wine and offerings. The sacrificial rite started, and the soul of the dead was duly consoled by the sorcerer. A tuft of hair was removed from the skull and solemnly put in a basket which was used for divination."

In 1871, a Ryūkyūan vessel shipwrecked on the southern tip of Taiwan, and the crew of 54 were beheaded by the Paiwan aborigines (Mudan Incident). When Japan sought compensation from Qing China, the court rejected the demand on the grounds that the "wild"/"unsubjugated" aboriginals (Chinese: 台灣生番; pinyin: Táiwān shēngfān) were outside its jurisdiction. This perceived renunciation of sovereignty led to the Japanese invasion of Taiwan in 1874 in which chief Tauketok was killed in action.

During the Chinese Civil War, between 1946 and 1949, many Paiwan men were forcibly enlisted in the Kuomintang forces. When the war ended, some of the Paiwan remained behind in China and formed their own communities.

Customs

Unlike other tribes in Taiwan, Paiwan society is divided into classes with a hereditary aristocracy. The Paiwan are not allowed to marry outside their tribe. On the day of their "five-yearly rite," "all marriage-seeking Paiwan men try to cut down as many trees as possible and offer the firewood thus procured to the family of the girl they want to woo.

Religion

A representation of a Paiwan ceremonial rack of skulls in Formosan Aboriginal Culture Village.

Traditionally the Paiwan have been polytheists. Their wooden carvings included images of human heads, snakes, deer, and geometric designs. In Taiwan, the Bataul branch of the Paiwan tribe holds a major sacrifice - called maleveq - every five years to invite the spirits of their ancestors to come and bless them. Djemuljat is an activity in the Maleveq in which the participants thrust bamboo poles into cane balls symbolizing human heads.[4]

Shamanism

Shamanism has been described as an important part of Paiwan culture. Paiwan shamanism is traditionally seen as being inherited by blood-line. However, a decline in the number of Paiwan shamans has raised concerns that traditional rituals might be lost; and has led to the founding of a shamanism school to pass on the rituals to a new generation.[5]

Christianity

Christianity first came to the Paiwan people in the seventeenth century, when Taiwan was occupied by the Dutch. More than 5,000 tribesmen became Christians after only ten years, but all of them were massacred in 1661 when Koxinga occupied Taiwan. The missionaries were either killed or driven away, and the churches were destroyed.

Thousands of Paiwan people in Taiwan came to Christianity in the late 1940s and 1950s, sometimes whole villages. Today the Presbyterian church in Taiwan claims 14,900 Paiwan members, meeting in 96 congregations. The New Testament has been translated into Paiwan.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201502150011.aspx
  2. ^ Directorate General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics, Executive Yuan, R.O.C. (DGBAS). National Statistics, Republic of China (Taiwan). Preliminary statistical analysis report of 2000 Population and Housing Census. Excerpted from Table 28:Indigenous population distribution in Taiwan-Fukien Area. Accessed PM 8/30/06
  3. ^  
  4. ^ "排灣族五年祭的宗教意涵與身體活動", by 謝志鴻.p. 67.
  5. ^ Collins, Nick (21 Sep 2009). "School of witchcraft opens in Taiwan". Telegraph.co.uk. 
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