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Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church

 

Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church

The Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, styled "The Most Reverend the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church", is the presiding bishop of the Scottish Episcopal Church. The current primus is the Most Revd David Chillingworth who became primus on 13 June 2009. He was elected at a meeting of an episcopal synod which took place on the final day of the Scottish Episcopal Church General Synod.

Contents

  • Roles 1
  • History 2
  • Bishops elected as primus 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Bibliography 6

Roles

The Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church has the following tasks:

  • to preside at all provincial liturgical functions
  • to preside at all meetings of the General Synod of the Scottish Episcopal Church
  • to preside at all meetings of the Episcopal Synod
  • to declare and carry out the resolutions of the General Synod, the Episcopal Synod and the College of Bishops
  • to represent the Scottish Episcopal Church in its relation to all other churches of the Anglican Communion and other communions
  • to perform the functions and duties of primus as specified in the canons of the Scottish Episcopal Church
  • to correspond on behalf of the Scottish Episcopal Church with primates, metropolitans and the secretary general of the Anglican Consultative Council.

History

The primus does not have any metropolitan jurisdiction. Metropolitan responsibilities are held by the diocesan bishops. The last head of the Scottish Episcopal Church who was primate and metropolitan was Archbishop Arthur Rose of St Andrews up to his death in 1704.[1] And the last bishop to exercise metropolitan authority was Bishop Alexander Rose of Edinburgh up to his death in 1720.[2]

Bishops elected as primus

Holders of the role since the creation of the post in the early 18th century.[3]

Primi of Scotland
From Until Incumbent Notes
1720 1727 John Fullarton Bishop of Edinburgh, 1720–1727.
May 1727 Oct 1727 Arthur Millar Bishop of Edinburgh, May–Oct 1727.
1727 1731 Andrew Lumsden Bishop of Edinburgh, 1727–1733.
1731 1738 David Freebairn Bishop of Galloway, 1731–1733; Bishop of Edinburgh, 1733–1739.
1738 1743 Thomas Rattray Bishop of Dunkeld, 1727–1743.
1743 1757 Robert Keith Bishop of Caithness, Orkney and The Isles, 1731–1757.
1757 1761 Robert White Bishop of Fife, 1743–1761.
1762 1782 William Falconer Bishop of Moray, 1742–1778; Bishop of Edinburgh, 1776–1784.
1782 1788 Robert Kilgour Bishop of Aberdeen, 1768–1786.
1788 1816 John Skinner Bishop of Aberdeen, 1786–1816.
1816 1837 George Gleig Bishop of Brechin, 1810–1840.
1837 1841 James Walker Bishop of Edinburgh, 1830–1841.
1841 1857 William Skinner Bishop of Aberdeen, 1816–1857.
1857 1862 Charles Terrot Bishop of Edinburgh, 1841–1872.
1862 1886 Robert Eden Bishop of Moray, Ross & Caithness, 1851–1886.
1886 1901 Hugh Jermyn Bishop of Brechin, 1875–1903.
1901 1904 James Kelly Bishop of Moray, Ross & Caithness, 1886–1904.
1904 1907 George Wilkinson Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld & Dunblane, 1893–1907.
1908 1934 Walter Robberds Bishop of Brechin, 1904–1934.
1935 1943 Arthur Maclean Bishop of Moray, Ross & Caithness, 1904–1943.
1943 1946 Logie Danson Bishop of Edinburgh, 1939–1946.
1946 1952 John How Bishop of Glasgow & Galloway, 1938–1952.
1952 1962 Thomas Hannay Bishop of Argyll & The Isles, 1942–1962.
1962 1973 Francis Moncreiff Bishop of Glasgow & Galloway, 1952–1973.
1974 1977 Richard Wimbush Bishop of Argyll & The Isles, 1963–1977.
1977 1985 Alastair Haggart Bishop of Edinburgh, 1975–1985.
1985 1990 Lawrence Luscombe Bishop of Brechin, 1975–1990.
1990 1992 George Henderson Bishop of Argyll & The Isles, 1977–1992.
1992 2000 Richard Holloway Bishop of Edinburgh, 1986–2000.
2001 2006 Bruce Cameron Bishop of Aberdeen & Orkney, 1992–2006.
2006 2009 Idris Jones Bishop of Glasgow & Galloway, 1998–2009.
2009 present David Chillingworth Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld & Dunblane, 2005–present.

See also

References

  1. ^ A Short History of the Episcopal Church in Scotland by Frederick Goldie (revised edition — 1975) ISBN 0-7152-0315-0
  2. ^ Bertie 2000, Scottish Episcopal Clergy, pp.121–122.
  3. ^ Bertie 2000, Scottish Episcopal Clergy, p.513.

Bibliography

  • Bertie, David M. (2000). Scottish Episcopal Clergy, 1689-2000. Edinburgh: T & T Clark.  
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