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Quindecimviri sacris faciundis

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Title: Quindecimviri sacris faciundis  
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Subject: Cybele, College of Pontiffs, Epulones, Lectisternium, Secular Games
Collection: Ancient Roman Religious Titles, Pagan Religious Organizations
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Quindecimviri sacris faciundis

In ancient Rome, the quindecimviri sacris faciundis were the fifteen (quindecim) members of a college (collegium) with priestly duties. Most notably they guarded the Sibylline Books, scriptures which they consulted and interpreted at the request of the Senate. This collegium also oversaw the worship of any foreign gods which were introduced to Rome.

Originally these duties had been performed by duumviri (or duoviri), two men of patrician status. Their number was increased to ten by a Licinio-Sextian law in 367 BCE, which also stipulated that half of these priests were to be plebeian. During the Middle Republic, members of the college were admitted through cooption. At some point in the third century BCE, several priesthoods, probably including the quindecimviri, began to be elected through the voting tribes.[1]

References

  1. ^ Andrew Lintott, The Constitution of the Roman Republic (Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 183–184 online.

External links

  • Decemviri Sacris Faciundis in Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities at LacusCurtius
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