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Raw material

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Raw material

Anthracite coal stockpile at the shipping area of a mid-slope coal processing plant. The road leading up beyond the stockpile leads down from a Mountain top strip mine which sources the materials.
Latex being collected from a tapped rubber tree

A raw material, also known as a feedstock or most correctly unprocessed material, is a basic material that is used to produce goods, finished products, energy, or intermediate materials which are feedstock for future finished products. As feedstock, the term connotes these materials are bottleneck assets and are highly important with regards to producing other products. An example of this is crude oil, which is a raw material and a feedstock used in the production of industrial chemicals, fuels, plastics, and pharmaceutical goods; lumber is a raw material used to produce a variety of products including furniture.[1]

The term "raw material" denotes materials in minimally processed or unprocessed states; e.g., raw [2]

Africa has 30% of global reserves of non-energy mineral raw materials but this wealth has had a negative impact upon African countries. This phenomenon, known as "Dutch Disease" or the "resource curse", occurs when the economy of a country is mainly based upon its exports due to its method of governance.[3] An example of this is the "geological scandal" of the Democratic Republic of Congo as it is rich in raw materials; the Second Congo War focused on controlling these raw materials.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Wolf, Jakob (15 January 2010). Schnellkurs HGB-Jahresabschluss: Das neue Bilanzrecht: Richtig vorgehen — erfolgreich umstellen. Walhalla Fachverlag. p. 90.  
  2. ^ Christophe Degryse, L'économie en 100 et quelques mots d'actualité, De Boeck, 2005, p. 140.
  3. ^ Bernard Tchibambelela, Le commerce mondial de la faim: stratégie de rupture positive au Congo-Brazzaville, Éditions L'Harmattan, 2009, p. 183.
  4. ^ Pascal Boniface, La géopolitique: Les relations internationales, Éditions Eyrolles et tout le monde s'en fou, 2011.

Further reading

  • Karl Marx, , Vol. 1, Part III, Chap. 7Capital.
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