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Retailers' cooperative

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Title: Retailers' cooperative  
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Subject: Ace Hardware, Affiliated Foods Midwest, United Hardware Distributing Company, Carpet One, True Value
Collection: Cooperatives, Retailers' Cooperatives, Retailing
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Retailers' cooperative

Marketing cooperative links here; see also Agricultural marketing cooperative

A retailers' cooperative is a type of


See also

  1. ^ Baron, Marie-Laure (September 2007). "Defining the Frontiers of the Firm through Property Rights Allocation: The Case of the French Retailer Cooperative Leclerc". Review of Social Economy. Volume 65 (No. 3): 293-317. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Hibbard, Jonathan D. "Merchandising Conglomerates". Encyclopedia Britannica. 
  3. ^ Baron, Marie-Laure (September 2007). . "Defining the Frontiers of the Firm through Property Rights Allocation: The Case of the French Retailer Cooperative Leclerc" . Review of Social Economy 35 (No. 3). 
  4. ^ Bogardus, Emory (1964). Principles of Cooperation. Chicago, IL: The Cooperative League of the U.S.A. p. 20-24. 
  5. ^ Bogardus, Emory (1964). Principles of Cooperation. Chicago, IL: The Cooperative League of the U.S.A. p. 20-24. 
  6. ^ Hibbard, Jonathan. "Merchandising Conglomerates". Encyclopedia Britannica. 
  7. ^ Baron, Marie-Laure (September 2007). "Defining the Frontiers of the Firm through Property Rights Allocation: The Case of the French Retailer Cooperative Leclerc". Review of Social Economy (35). 
  8. ^ http://www.frontlinestores.com.au

References

Some examples of retailer's cooperatives include

Examples

The aim of the cooperative is to improve buying conditions for its members, which are retail businesses in this case. The incentive to remain in the cooperative is largely due to the profits that members gain. Generally, any surpluses are shared by the members in accordance with their original input.[7]

In order to lower costs, retailers' cooperatives establish central buying locations, providing them with the opportunity to purchase in bulk. Retailers' cooperatives also engage in group advertising and promotion, uniform stock merchandising, and private branding. [6] This leads to consumer recognition of brands such as ACE Hardware, giving the stores the benefits of being a franchise, with the autonomy and freedom of an independent store.

Financing/Economic Goals

Retailers' cooperatives are governed by democratic member control, which generally means one vote per member. Some firms, such as E. Leclerc, are able to make decisions in this fashion, with each member business only receiving one vote.[3] For many retailer co-ops, however, it is difficult to achieve a democratic standard.[4] Since the members are businesses rather than individuals, offering one vote per member will leave the larger member businesses underrepresented. If the amount of votes is based on the size of the business, there is a risk of all smaller businesses within the cooperative being outvoted by a larger business. A democratic solution that many retailers' cooperatives employ is an increase in votes based on business size, up to a certain point, say 5 or 10 votes. This way, there is a varying degree of representation for member businesses, but no one member can gain too much control.[5]

Governance and operation

Contents

  • Governance and operation 1
  • Financing/Economic Goals 2
  • Examples 3
  • References 4
  • See also 5

Consumers' cooperatives, sometimes referred to as retail cooperatives, should be distinguished from retailers' cooperatives.

to participate in retailers' cooperatives. pharmacies and hardware stores, grocery stores It is common for locally owned [2]

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