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Richard Hurd (bishop)

Richard Hurd
Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry and Worcester
Bishop Hurd, as painted by Thomas Gainsborough.
Personal details
Born 1720
Congreve, Penkridge, Staffordshire
Died 28 May 1808(1808-05-28) (aged 88)
Hartlebury Castle, Worcestershire
Buried Hartlebury churchyard
Denomination Church of England
Parents John Hurd (1685–1755) and Hannah Hurd (c. 1685–1773).
Alma mater Emmanuel

Richard Hurd (13 January 1720 – 28 May 1808) was an English divine and writer, and bishop of Worcester.[1]

Contents

  • Life 1
  • Works 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Life

He was born at Congreve, in the parish of Penkridge, Staffordshire, where his father was a farmer. He was educated at Brewood Grammar School and at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He took his B.A. degree in 1739, and in 1742 he proceeded M.A. and became a fellow of his college.[2] In the same year he was ordained deacon, and given charge of the parish of Reymerston, Norfolk, but he returned to Cambridge early in 1743. He was ordained priest in 1744. In 1748 he published some Remarks on an Enquiry into the Rejection of Christian Miracles by the Heathens (1746), by William Weston, a fellow of St John's College, Cambridge.[1]

He prepared editions, which won the praise of Edward Gibbon, of the Ars poetica and Epistola ad Pisones (1749), and the Epistola ad Augustum (1751) of Horace. A compliment in the preface to the edition of 1749 was the starting-point of a lasting friendship with William Warburton, through whose influence he was appointed one of the preachers at Whitehall in 1750. In 1765 he was appointed preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and in 1767 he became archdeacon of Gloucester.

In 1768, he proceeded D.D. at Cambridge, and delivered at Lincoln's Inn the first the prince of Wales and the duke of York. In 1781 he was translated to the see of Worcester. He lived chiefly at Hartlebury Castle, where he built a fine library, to which he transferred Alexander Pope's and Warburton's books, purchased on the latter's death.

He was extremely popular at court, and in 1783, on the death of Archbishop Cornwallis, the king pressed him to accept the primacy, but Hurd, who was known, says Madame d'Arblay, as "The Beauty of Holiness,” declined it as a charge not suited to his temper and talents, and much too heavy for him to sustain. He died, unmarried, on 28 May 1808.

He bequeathed his library to his successors as bishop, and it remains at Hartlebury Castle, but its fate remains uncertain, now that the castle has ceased to be used as the bishop's residence.[3]

Works

Hurd's Letters on Chivalry and Romance (1762) retain a certain interest for their importance in the history of the romantic movement, which they did something to stimulate. They were written in continuation of a dialogue on the age of Queen Elizabeth included in his Moral and Political Dialogues (1759) Two later dialogues On the Uses of Foreign Travel were printed in 1763. Hurd wrote two acrimonious defences of Warburton On the Delicacy of Friendship (1755), in answer to John Jortin and a Letter (1764) to Dr Thomas Leland, who had criticized Warburton's Doctrine of Grace. He edited the Works of William Warburton, the Select Works (1772) of Abraham Cowley, and left materials for an edition (6 vols., 1811) of Addison. His own works appeared in a collected edition in 8 vols. 1811.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain
  2. ^
  3. ^ The Hartlebury Castle Preservation Trust

External links

  • Vol. IThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. IIThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. IIIThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. IVThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. VThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. VIThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. VIIThe works of Richard Hurd
  • Vol. VIIIThe works of Richard Hurd
  • 'Dialogues of the Uses of Foreign Travel', (1764)
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Brownlow North
Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry
1775–1781
Succeeded by
Hon. James Cornwallis
Preceded by
Brownlow North
Bishop of Worcester
1781–1808
Succeeded by
Folliott Herbert Walker Cornewall
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