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Second Treaty of Brömsebro (1645)

 

Second Treaty of Brömsebro (1645)

The Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645. Brown: Denmark-Norway; Green: Sweden; Yellow: the provinces of Jämtland, Härjedalen, Idre & Särna and the Baltic Sea islands of Gotland and Ösel, which were ceded to Sweden; Red: the province of Halland, ceded for 30 years

The Second Treaty of Brömsebro (or the Peace of Brömsebro) was signed on 13 August 1645, and ended the Torstenson War, a local conflict that began in 1643 (and was part of the larger Thirty Years' War) between Sweden and Denmark-Norway. Negotiations for the treaty began in February the same year.

Contents

  • Location 1
  • Delegations 2
  • Results 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

Location

The eastern border between the then Danish province of Blekinge and the Swedish province of Småland was formed by the creek Brömsebäck. In this creek lies an islet that was connected to the Danish and Swedish riversides by bridges. On the islet was a stone that was supposed to mark the exact border between the two countries. By this stone, the delegates met to exchange greetings and, at the end of the negotiations, the signed documents.[1] The Danish delegation stayed in Kristianopel while the Swedish side had their accommodation in Söderåkra.[2]

Delegations

Sweden's highest ranking representative was Lord High Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna. He was accompanied by, among others, Johan Skytte, who died during the negotiations and was replaced by Ture Sparre.[2]

Corfitz Ulfeldt and Chancellor Christen Thomesen Sehested were the chief negotiators of the Danish delegation.[2]

The French diplomat Gaspard Coignet de la Thuillerie was head mediator and observers from the Hanseatic League, Portugal, Stralsund and Mecklenburg followed the negotiations.[2]

Results

The military strength of Sweden ultimately forced Denmark-Norway to give in to Swedish demands.

The treaty was to be followed by the Treaty of Roskilde of 1658, which forced Denmark-Norway to further concessions.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Englund, Peter (2003). Ofredsår (in Swedish). Stockholm: Atlantis. pp. 368 and 394.  
  2. ^ a b c d Eriksson, Bo (2007). Lützen 1632 (in Swedish). Stockholm: Norstedts Pocket. pp. 32–33.  

References

  • History of the Norwegian People by Knut Gjerset, The MacMillan Company, 1915, Volume I.
  • Nordens Historie, ved Hiels Bache, Forslagsbureauet i Kjøbenhavn, 1884.
  • The Struggle for Supremacy in the Baltic: 1600-1725 by Jill Lisk; Funk & Wagnalls, New York, 1967.
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