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Silesian Stadium

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Silesian Stadium

Silesian Stadium
Stadion Śląski
Kocioł czarownic
Full name Silesian Stadium
Stadion Śląski
Location Chorzów, Silesia, Poland
Owner Silesian Voivodeship
Capacity 54,477[1]
(in the past 120,000)
Record attendance 130 000 (1973 Speedway World Championship, 2 September 1973)
Field size 105 x 68 m
Construction
Built 1951–1956
Opened 22 July 1956
Expanded 2009–2013
Construction cost no data
465 mln PLN (expansion only)
Tenants
Poland national team
(to 1993 as de facto, 1993-2012 as official)
Silesian national team¹
and:
Górnik Zabrze¹
GKS Katowice¹
Ruch Chorzów¹
Polonia Bytom¹
GKS Tychy¹
other club from Upper-Silesian Metropolis¹
¹ - only important matches

Silesian Stadium (Polish: Stadion Śląski) is a sport stadium located between Chorzów and Katowice, Silesia, Poland. It opened on 22 July 1956 and has since hosted crowds of over 120,000 for both football matches and motorcycle speedway world championships. It also hosts music festivals.

History

In 1949 the decision was made to build the Silesia Stadium in 1950 and Julian Brzuchowski was chosen as its designer. Silesia Stadium was completed in 1956, together with the 10th Anniversary Stadium (Polish: Stadion Dziesięciolecia) in Warsaw. On 22 July 1956, it hosted its first event - a friendly game with the East Germany national football team (2:0 for the Germans). Electric lighting was installed in 1959.

In 1993, the stadium was designated as the official home stadium of the Polish national football team. In the 1990s, the stadium was converted to an all-seater stadium, reducing the capacity to 47,246. Currently, there are plans to expand its capacity to 55,211 and to construct a roof over the stadium (claimed to become one of the largest in the world, 43,000 m2).[2]

Events

Football

Poland national football team

Poland vs Norway football match at Silesia Stadium in 2001
No. Date Match Result Turnout
1 22 July 1956 PolandGDR 0–2 90 000
2 20 October 1957 Poland – USSR 2–1 100 000
3 11 May 1958 Poland – Ireland 2–2 80 000
4 14 September 1958 Poland – Hungary 1–3 90 000
5 28 June 1959 Poland – Spain 2–4 100 000
6 8 November 1959 Poland – Finland 6–2 22 000
7 26 June 1960 Poland – Bulgaria 4–0 25 000
8 25 June 1961 Poland – Yugoslavia 1–1 100 000
9 5 November 1961 Poland – Denmark 5–0 10 000
10 10 October 1962 Poland – Northern Ireland 0–2 50 000
11 2 June 1963 Poland – Romania 1–1 40 000
12 23 May 1965 Poland – Scotland 1–1 80 000
13 3 May 1966 Poland – Hungary 1–1 95 000
14 5 July 1966 Poland – England 0–1 70 000
15 21 May 1967 Poland – Belgium 3–1 65 000
16 24 April 1968 Poland – Turkey 8–0 35 000
17 30 October 1968 Poland – Ireland 1–0 18 000
18 7 September 1969 Poland – Netherlands 2–1 85 000
19 14 October 1970 Poland – Albania 3–0 10 000
20 6 June 1973 Poland – England 2–0 90 000
21 26 September 1973 Poland – Wales 3–0 90 000
22 10 September 1975 Poland – Netherlands 4–1 85 000
23 24 March 1976 Poland – Argentina 1–2 60 000
24 21 September 1977 Poland – Denmark 4–1 80 000
25 29 September 1977 Poland – Portugal 1–1 80 000
26 4 April 1979 Poland – Hungary 1–1 60 000
27 2 May 1979 Poland – Netherlands 2–0 85 000
28 26 September 1979 Poland – GDR 1–1 70 000
29 6 June 1980 Poland – Czechoslovakia 1–1 45 000
30 2 May 1981 Poland – GDR 1–0 80 000
31 2 September 1981 Poland – Germany 0–2 70 000
32 22 May 1983 Poland – USSR 1–1 75 000
33 11 September 1985 Poland – Belgium 0–0 75 000
34 16 November 1985 Poland – Italy 1–0 20 000
35 19 October 1988 Poland – Albania 1–0 35 000
36 11 October 1989 Poland – England 0–0 35 000
37 25 October 1989 Poland – Sweden 0–2 15 000
38 29 May 1993 Poland – England 1–1 65 000
39 2 April 1997 Poland – Italy 0–0 32 000
40 31 May 1997 Poland – England 0–2 30 000
41 27 May 1998 Poland – Russia 3–1 8 000
42 31 March 1999 Poland – Sweden 0–1 28 000
43 1 September 2001 Poland – Norway 3–0 43 000
44 6 October 2001 Poland – Ukraine 1–1 25 000
45 29 March 2003 Poland – Hungary 0–0 47 000
46 10 September 2003 Poland – Sweden 0–2 20 000
47 8 September 2004 Poland – England 1–2 45 000
48 3 September 2005 Poland – Austria 3–2 45 000
49 31 May 2006 Poland – Colombia 1–2 40 000
50 11 October 2006 Poland – Portugal 2–1 45 000
51 17 November 2007 Poland – Belgium 2–0 47 000
52 1 June 2008 Poland – Denmark 1–1 35 000
53 11 October 2008 Poland – Czech Republic 2–1 47 000
54 5 September 2009 Poland – Northern Ireland 1–1 45 000
55 14 October 2009 Poland – Slovakia 0–1 4 000[3]

Speedway

The football pitch at the Silesia Stadium is surrounded by a 384 metres (420 yd) long Polish riders, though in truth Szczakiel was in such rare form on the day that he did not need help from the referee.

Ivan Mauger won the 1979 World Final at the stadium. This was his 6th and last individual title and his 15th World Championship in speedway win having also won two World Pairs crowns, four World Team Cup titles and three Long Track World Championships.

Speedway World Finals

Individual Speedway World Championship
Speedway World Pairs Championship
Speedway World Team Cup
Speedway Grand Prix

Other

In 2009, it was the venue of performances by Monster Jam.

References

  1. ^ "stadion". Oficjalna strona Stadionu Śląskiego. Retrieved 27 June 2013. 
  2. ^ "Nowy Stadion Śląski robi wrażenie (wideo)" (in Polski). Sport.pl. Retrieved 2013-10-10. 
  3. ^ Match boycotted by Polish fans because of dissatisfaction of bad actions in Polish Football Association.
  4. ^ 1973 Speedway World Championship Final - Szczakiel va Mauger
  • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" (Half a century of the Silesian Stadium)
  • Gazeta Wyborcza
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 1, 26 czerwca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 3, 10 lipca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 4, 17 lipca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4

External links

  • Official website (Polish)
  • Slaski Stadion photos at worldstadiums
  • Stadium history (Polish)

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