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Snout

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Title: Snout  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Dog anatomy, Crocodile, Swine vesicular disease, Pope Sergius IV, Romer's tree frog
Collection: Animal Anatomy, Dog Anatomy
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Snout

Tapir (Tapirus terrestris) snout showing flehmen
Snout of a male elephant seal

A snout is the protruding portion of an animal's face, consisting of its nose, mouth, and jaw. In many animals the equivalent structure is called a muzzle, rostrum or proboscis. The wet, naked surface around the nostrils of the nose is known as the rhinarium (colloquially this is the "cold wet nose" of some animals). The rhinarium is often associated with a stronger sense of olfaction. The snout is considered a weak point on most animals: because of its structure, an animal can be easily stunned, snapped or even knocked out by applying sufficient force.

Variation

Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus indicus). The extended proboscis is called the "trunk" and is used for a wide range of purposes, including feeding, drinking, exploration, and social grooming.

Snouts are found on many other mammals in a variety of shapes. Some animals, including ursines and great cats, have box-like snouts, while others, like shrews, have pointed snouts. Pig snouts are flat and cylindrical.

Dogs

The muzzle begins at the scents. The loose flaps of skin on the sides of the upper muzzle that hang to different lengths over the mouth are called flews.

It is innervated by one of the twelve pairs of cranial nerves. These nerves start in the brain and emerge through the skull to their target organs. Other destinations of these nerves are eyeballs, teeth and tongue.

The muzzle shape of a domestic dog

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