World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Sovietisation

Article Id: WHEBN0003938756
Reproduction Date:

Title: Sovietisation  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Latvia, Polish United Workers' Party, Flight and expulsion of Germans (1944–50)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Sovietisation

Sovietization is term that may be used with two distinct (but related) meanings:

  • the adoption of a political system based on the model of soviets (workers' councils).
  • the adoption of a way of life and mentality modelled after the Soviet Union.

A notable wave of Sovietization (in the second meaning) occurred during and after World War II in Eastern Europe. In a broad sense, this included (mostly involuntary) adoption of Soviet-like institutions, laws, customs, traditions and the Soviet way of life, both on a national level and in smaller communities. This was usually promoted and speeded up by propaganda aimed at creating a common way of life in all states within the Soviet sphere of influence. In many cases, Sovietization was also accompanied by forced resettlement of large categories of "class enemies" (kulaks, or osadniks, for instance) to the Gulag labor camps and exile settlements.[1]

In a narrow sense, the term Sovietization is often applied to mental and social changes within the population of the Soviet Union and its satellites[2] which led to creation of the new Soviet man (according to its supporters) or Homo Sovieticus (according to its critics).[3]

Most recently the term "Sovietization" is applied in a derogatory sense to processes in Russia under Vladimir Putin, with various authors putting various, often mutually contradictory, meanings in the word referring to various attributes of the former Soviet Union.

See also

References

Further reading

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.